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Home » School News » WHAT’S THE DRILL?

WHAT’S THE DRILL?


What started as a small trial for a handful of MLC School girls, quickly took on much greater proportions when more than 80 Year 9, Year 10 and Year 11 girls signed up to join with Newington College in an inaugural combined Cadets program. This is the first time in MLC School history that Cadets has been available to girls from Year 9 onwards.

Head of Senior School, Mr Neil Scotney, says, ‘As a school, MLC School has a strong history in empowering young women and being one of the first schools in Australia to offer girls the same level of education as boys, it was a natural progression that we allow girls the opportunity to take part in the Schools Cadets Program. We are always proud of the way an MLC School girl embraces new challenges and Cadets provides the perfect platform for them to push the limits and further unpack our school values of courage, compassion, respect and growth.’

The program provides girls with exciting and challenging opportunities to move
outside of their comfort zone, work effectively in teams and develop individual character and leadership skills.

Army-2

The cadet training program works within the structures and values of the Australian Defence Force. It is exciting and varied, and encompasses a range of activities such as scuba diving, rock climbing, abseiling, archery, bush navigation and camp craft. There are also leadership courses offered which are progressive in nature and teach the girls valuable life skills. The successful completion of these courses results in promotion to a higher rank. There is also an annual camp and a promotions camp.

Esther Maling, an MLC School Old Girl and the MLC School Senior Sports Coordinator, is the Cadets Coordinator. Esther says, “It is an amazing opportunity and demonstrates that MLC School provides every chance for our girls to challenge and grow within any area of interest.

“I believe it is important that a female leads the unit as a role model and familiar face, as there will be times that the girls are really challenged as females in a male-dominated field.

“I finished school in 2010 and would definitely have been a cadet if it had been available. My sister, who finished in 2012, is now a Logistics Officer in the Royal Australian
Air Force, and she would have jumped at the chance to have an insight into cadet life
during high school.”

Friday 14 February 2020 was the first official MLC School Cadet Unit training at Newington College. The girls met their Sergeants and Cadet Under Officers (CUOs) and the rest of the cadets in platoons for the first time. They spent time doing drill, learnt basic marching, and lined up for uniform checks. Cadet drills continued under flexible learning as much as possible during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Religion Uniting Church
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 1250 students
Fees: Over 16k
Approx. $18,052 (Kindergarten) to $31,584 (Year 12)
Phone
9747 12******* 9747 1266
Address Rowley Street, Burwood NSW 2134
Email
enrol@m*******
enrol@mlcsyd.nsw.edu.au
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Home » » Internship Programme at Ruyton Girls’ School

Internship Programme at Ruyton Girls’ School


As actress Helen Hayes said, ‘The expert in anything was once a beginner.’ I wholeheartedly agree and therefore am perplexed by the increasing number of job postings advertising ‘entry-level’ roles yet requiring ‘three plus years of experience in a similar role.’ It is rapidly becoming a remarkable feat to secure suitable employment after graduation; in fact, the Foundation for Young Australians has reported that 30 percent of graduates are currently unemployed, or underemployed. To make matters worse, employers are reporting mismatches in the skills young people are learning at university and those that industries require.

In our globally-connected, technologically enhanced world where the most prevalent jobs being advertised did not exist five years ago it begs the question: how are we preparing our young people to be successful in their adult life?

To continue supporting our girls to become leaders within our global community, the Internship Programme was introduced this year – an authentic, project-based Year 9/10 elective offering that connects our student interns with industry professionals and organisations beyond the four walls of the classroom. Unlike our work experience programme, the Internship Programme is completed onsite over an extended period and is centred around a major work project that the mentor is currently working on and is willing to share with a student intern.

After nine weeks of professional learning, which included creating resumes, cover letters, digital portfolios, user manuals and vision boards, our students interviewed with leaders of industry to secure a six-week internship across a range of fields. Our girls secured internships as Data Scientists and Research Assistants alongside Post-Doctorate research fellows and as Graphic Designers and Quality Assurance Testers for creative studios, to name a few. Throughout the internship, our girls worked alongside industry professionals to not only complete a project but to also refine their future work skills, such as working with colleagues in a professional manner, dealing with deadlines, and how to manage workflow.

‘I was able to complete tasks that adults with university qualifications are doing. I completed a thematic analysis, a generalised linear model and presented the information to my mentor to be used in a published report …’ Zoe B, Year 9 (interned as a Data Scientist with Dr Amanda Krause supporting her work at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music and the ARC Centre for the History of Emotions.)

‘I have started to think differently because I have realised that I won’t always have a teacher to help and answer my questions and that in the real world you often have to figure things out yourself …’ Asha J, Year 9 (interned with Mr Terry Burdak supporting Beta Testing at Paperhouse Games.)

‘Internship was something I always looked forward to and will miss it as this elective has helped me discover things I didn’t know about myself. It has helped me be more open-minded and has made me really think about my future …’ Kelly N, Year 9 (interned as a Development Co-ordinator with Mrs Jenni Musgrove supporting Spirit Week at Ruyton Girls’ School.)

Our Internship Programme aims to provide exposure and experience to help our girls make increasingly considered choices about their future academic and professional journeys. As Steve Jobs once said, ‘Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it.’

Mr Jake Plaskett, Director of Learning Innovation

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees: 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » Education Advice » Having Fun is Child’s Play

Having Fun is Child’s Play


Create the ultimate playground for your restless kids this school holidays

For most parents the school holidays are a stressful time of the year. It’s all fun and games while the kids are at school, but once school is out, parents have to find ways to keep their energetic kids occupied without breaking the bank. Nothing screams louder than a hungry five-year-old as you visit Sydney Olympic Park for that memory-making archery contest. Years from now, your kids will be laughing as they describe their own version of the Hunger Games with mum and dad as reluctant volunteers. Better to keep them safe and tucked away in the house where they can’t do your psyche, or your body, any harm.

So how do you keep them occupied over the holidays? You could always do it yourself with the new range of DIY playset products from Sandleford, a leading Australian hardware supplier. There’s nothing like letting your rough-and-tumble kid entertain themselves with the Swing Slide Climb Cabana Cubby House. With springy Pour-in-Place rubber surfacing to protect your child’s knees and soft Rainbow sand for that ultimate fairy castle, your child can be entertained for hours while you remain safe and stress-free.

Jay Flavel, business manager of Sandleford, says Sandleford products are all available exclusively at Bunnings and are good safe fun for accident-prone youngsters. “Kids can now enjoy the outdoors all while feeling safe on non-slip, permeable Pour-in-Place rubber surfacing – and best of all, it’s all DIY,” says Jay.

The Swing Slide Climb Cabana Cubby House is made from real timber and features a spacious verandah with ladder access, fully functioning windows and a 1.2 metre slide which can lead right down into the Rainbow Sand pit.

Available in a variety of colours, Rainbow sand is exceedingly safe: fun, non-toxic and non-staining, a big help to your ever-growing summer washing basket. Suitable for ages 3 and up, if you play it right, you’ll never have to see your kids again: they will be too mesmerised by sunshine and sparkly colours.

Finally, Pour-in-Place Rubber Surfacing is suitable for pathways, playgrounds, pool surrounds, stairs and more, meaning not only can you keep your kids safely out of your hair, but you can start on that long-overdue backyard renovation while you’re at it. It’s impact-absorbing, non-slip and can be laid on any surface. Have your proverbial cake and eat too with seamless rubber surfacing in less than 50 minutes.

These easy DIY solutions will make your backyard the destination of choice for your kids.

To purchase or find out more, please visit www.pourinplace.com.au, /www.swingslideclimb.com.au or head into your nearest Bunnings Warehouse.

Words: Alana Lopez

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Home » School News » How teaching is changing

How teaching is changing


By Jake Plaskett, Director of Learning Innovation, Ruyton Girls’ School

Change is constant and innovation is optional. The world of teaching has changed, as have the ways in which we engage with the global community.

Indulge me as I share some history about how schooling, as we know it, came to be. In 1892, a working group of respected educators known as The Committee of Ten recommended a standardised curriculum that would be delivered over a 12-year period and include instruction in the following areas: foreign language, mathematics, the sciences, and English – this structure sounds strikingly familiar. Fast forward to 1916, famous educational psychologist, philosopher, and reformist Professor John Dewey recognised a need to transition beyond an industrial model of education and said “If we teach today’s students as we taught yesterday’s, we rob them of tomorrow”.

This proclamation was made more than 100 years ago, but education has yet to experience a significant re-imagination, which highlights the inevitability that change is constant and innovation is optional.

“As an independent, forward-thinking girls’ school we are committed to preparing girls to be lifelong learners and global citizens in an ever-changing world. We will build on our strong academic reputation through the development of signature learning programs that ignite intellectual passion and curiosity, challenging and empowering our girls as engaged citizens.” [An excerpt from The Ruyton Strategic Plan 2017-2020.]

Recently, our Year 8 girls embarked on the first iteration of Urban Escape, a one-week signature experience that challenged girls to build original escape rooms. Escape Rooms are a room, or series of rooms, that require players to solve multiple puzzles and riddles as they race against the clock. Our girls fearlessly conquered 15 different escape rooms across five separate venues in the Melbourne CBD. With advice from expert game makers and local escape room owners, our girls designed and constructed escape rooms for the school community to experience first-hand.

Through this process they were required to understand cryptography (the art of writing and deciphering codes), work within set parameters and physical spaces, monitor progress and create daily action plans, share resources and ideas within a group, and continue to develop as dynamic, agile, and flexible learners in an unfamiliar setting. The task was concrete but our girls were up for the challenge.

We invited the Ruyton community to join us for an interactive, public exhibition of our girls’ creations. More than 250 brave souls worked together in small teams to overcome the mental challenges and, in some rooms, terrifying surprises that awaited. The event was full of energy and our girls were so proud of their work; fellow students, teaching staff, and parents shared how impressed they were by the student’s ability to work collaboratively, resolve conflict, and creatively solve problems in such a short amount of time.

The Urban Escape Experience highlights the true capacity of our girls and illuminates the importance and necessity of striving to be more than an academic mark in standardised subject areas. It reminds us to celebrate both success and failure as a necessary and welcome part of a lifelong learning experience. As we move forward we shall continue to reimagine and redefine what successful and future thinking, teaching and learning looks like.

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Home » Education Advice » Citizens of the world

Citizens of the world


The concept of being a ‘citizen of the world’ dates back to Socrates, but never has it been more relevant. We are all citizens of an emerging global community connected through technology and humanity. It is important to be aware of the wider world, understand how it works and have a sense of our role in solutions for global issues such as extreme poverty, inequality, the need for peace and environmental sustainability.

Universities have traditionally been the setting where young people first engage with the idea of global citizenship, predominantly focusing on commerce and career opportunities. The time has come to broaden our outlook beyond jobs and engage students earlier so that they can influence the direction of the world they live in.

Ivanhoe Grammar’s new Global Leadership Centre will do this and more.  Officially launched on 29 May 2017, the Australian-first centre is run in partnership with the JUMP! Foundation, a not-for-profit social enterprise that specialises in youth empowerment, leadership and global citizenship education.

Citizens of the world

The centre is designed to build staff and student competency and facilitate experience and professional development for other schools, teachers and students. It will help educators Australia-wide to embrace global citizenship in their programs and see students run TEDx-style youth events and partner with local service groups.

Locals will be welcome at school events designed to foster a sense of community beyond the school gate, both locally and internationally. Students will develop social entrepreneurship and a global outlook from pre-school.

Starting with simple awareness activities, it is envisaged that students will run community events, organise public talks, attend service retreats and train in global leadership. They can earn unique certificates in global leadership, while teachers will be offered professional development in related areas.

Run by the JUMP! Foundation, the centre will nurture curriculum innovation, cultivate global education links online and in person, organise community events and host international student conferences.

The centre provides access to global education experts, the latest research, tools and transformative learning experiences to foster:

  • an understanding of global issues and their impact locally, nationally and overseas
  • global citizenship skills and attributes – particularly leadership, intercultural understanding and service learning
  • global citizen curriculum innovation to enhance student development and inspire educators
  • a commitment to engage with global issues and make change
  • local and international community partnerships

Being a ‘good citizen’ has been a focus at Ivanhoe Grammar School since its inception 102 years ago. Founding principal, The Reverend Sydney Buckley, described the role of education in developing people of character and developed a model of learning through service and leadership. It continues to define Ivanhoe Grammar School’s ethos.

Over the past 20 years, service and leadership activities at Ivanhoe Grammar School have evolved beyond the local community to international opportunities that encourage students to be good global citizens. Supporting them to develop a global outlook has seen initiatives including:

  • studying a language from ELC until at least the end of Year 9
  • all students studying VCE Global Politics as part of Year 10 Humanities, enabling them to understand Australia in a global context and engage in contemporary global issues
  • offering internationally recognised VCE alternative, the International Baccalaureate (IB), as a member of IB World Schools
  • joining the Round Square International Network to share experiences with like-minded schools globally through international conferences, cultural tours and collaborative learning with sister schools in this network.

Continual improvement is a key focus of Round Square schools which is why Ivanhoe Grammar School partnered with JUMP! Foundation to further develop global citizenship competencies throughout the school community. Working closely with JUMP!, its aim is to develop a best practice global citizenship education model for Australian schools.

Key activities that students have been involved in include:

      • establishing a cross-campus and year level student Global Ambassadors group to advocate global citizenship
      • an annual week-long global citizenship festival incorporating global education into the curriculum across all campuses and year levels
      • student community building initiatives, creating connections across campuses and year levels
      • working with Amnesty International to test its Human Rights Friendly Schools Program
      • attending the Asia Education Foundation Global Goals Youth Forum to discuss global goals for sustainable development and innovative solutions to achieve positive change
      • activities supporting UNICEF’s 17 global goals to end extreme poverty, fight inequality and injustice and address climate change by 2030

Ivanhoe Grammar School recognises that global citizenship is more than language skills and an understanding of politics and issues. It is about advocating for change, being involved in service activities benefiting local, national and international communities, and developing key characteristics of an Ivanhoe Learner: innovation, courage, compassion, balance, collaboration, reflection and ethics – all essential in becoming the best global citizens we can be.

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Religion Anglican
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 1550 (Ivanhoe), 486 (Plenty)
Fees: 4k - 8k 8k - 12k 12k - 16k Over 16k
Range per annum from $6,120pa (ELC) to $24,150pa (Year 12)
Phone
03 9490******* 03 9490 3426
Fax
03 9497******* 03 9497 4060
Address PO Box 91, Ivanhoe 3079
Email
enrol@i*******
enrol@ivanhoe.com.au
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Home » Education Advice » From a student perspective – UN Youth Delegation

From a student perspective – UN Youth Delegation


By Navya Kataria, Year 11

Talking to Syrian refugees who’ve just escaped certain death … playing a soccer game with primary school children in Jerusalem … attending one-on-one consultations with the Red Cross and UNICEF in Jordan and Israel … and riding camels in Wadi Rum. If anyone had told me I would do all of this in January, I wouldn’t have believed them. Yet, I was fortunate enough to earn the opportunity to travel to Israel and Jordan as one of 16 students selected across Australia to be part of the UN Youth Delegation.

So what fuelled my desire for participating in this program? Although the Middle East is a melting pot of various cultures, currently there are a plethora of issues that plague the region. The long drawn-out civil wars in the Middle Eastern countries, such as Syria and Iraq, have the most detrimental effects on the lives of people, both locally and globally. Its roots lie in religious fanaticism, intolerance, lack of education and poor awareness of human rights. This program offered me the chance to know and understand the various reasons for such unrest at a grass-root level, aiding me to broaden and challenge my own perspectives.

So, with this in mind, I embarked on a fascinating journey. From day one we delved deep into understanding the ongoing land dispute over Jerusalem, located in the West Bank, touching on issues such as the anti-semitism stemming from World War II, the illegal occupation of territory in the West Bank, and the horrific police brutality faced by many Palestinians in Jerusalem. No topic was left unscathed. I really knew I was on the other side of the world. I can never forget the Australian ambassador in Tel Aviv, Israel, telling us that from his window you can see missiles sent from HAMAS, a terrorist organisation in the GAZA strip, being launched over Tel Aviv and then being intercepted as if it was totally normal. And, for him, it was.

I was constantly challenging my own opinions regarding what was normal. We talked to the Red Cross, an impartial and neutral organisation, who visit detainees from both sides of the conflict in an attempt to hinder any humanitarian injustice. We also visited Australian embassies and organisations preventing violent extremism.

On a much lighter note, we immersed ourselves in middle eastern culture, climbing mountains in Petra, taking a dip in the Dead Sea, having late night conversations on geo-political issues on a rooftop of a convent in Nazareth and tasting the best hummus ever.

My favourite part of the trip was visiting the Max Rayne Hand in Hand School in Jerusalem. Founded in 1998, this school was one of the first integrated schools for Arab and Jewish students in the West Bank, aiming to cohesively bring together people, regardless of their upbringing. The school started with only 20 students and now has 696. I had the privilege of talking to students in Grade 6 and learning about their lives. During their lunch break they challenged us to play a soccer game. What really impressed me was that these children can still find joy, even when they are faced with constant turbulence and adversities.

Another highlight was attending a session with the Collateral Repair Project, a non-profit, non-government organisation founded in 2006. This group caters to the needs of Syrians, Iraqis, Jordanians and other nationals from war-torn countries. We met a Syrian refugee, a lawyer, who carried his grievously injured daughter Maria across the Syrian border to be treated after his house was bombed and reduced to rubble. His crime was representing children affected by war.

Visiting countries where there is so much unrest really sheds light on how lucky we are here in Australia. Today, unlike the Australian ambassador in Israel, the view from my bedroom window was of happy Melbournians enjoying an early morning hot air balloon ride. I’m never taking this sight for granted again.

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees: 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » School News » Ruyton Girls’ School: We believe in girls

Ruyton Girls’ School: We believe in girls


 

By Ms Linda Douglas, Principal

Each year, Ruyton recognises International Women’s Day, a day to celebrate the achievements and contributions women have made and continue to make economically, socially, culturally and politically. Last year TED talks released Teach Girls Bravery, Not Perfection. It is a talk with a strong message for us all, a reminder to cultivate a culture of excellence, of personal best, not a search for perfection for the women of tomorrow.

At the inaugural Global Forum for Girls’ Education, Dr Tara Christie Kinsey, principal at The Hewitt School, and Rachel Simmons, author, educator and co-founder of the Girls’ Leadership Institute presented a session on The Myth of Effortless Perfection. First coined in Duke University’s landmark study by the Women’s Initiative in 2003, the concept of ‘effortless perfection’ has given a name to the constant pressure felt by young women to be ‘smart, accomplished, fit, beautiful and popular,’ all without ‘visible effort.’ The price of such a lofty goal can have far-reaching consequences. The truth is that effortless perfection just isn’t real.

There are a number of issues that create the core of girl struggles today. The complicated nature of self-esteem, along with internalising behaviours, can lead to stress, depression and anxiety. We understand the need for girls to experience failure but we fail to recognise at times that girls, particularly high-achieving girls, are debilitated by failure and therefore are less likely to take risks. We need to actively teach girls the benefits of failure and clearly articulate the nature of feedback, while being sensitive to their possible interpretation.

Maniacal over-preparation, otherwise referred to as performing with a capital P, is not uncommon in high-achieving girls. Young women never talk about what they want to do, but rather the things they have to do. With this in mind it is imperative that we focus on restoring their agency to say no and give them time and permission to contemplate what matters and why.

As parents, leaders and educators we have a responsibility to support our girls to feel worthy, so that they have the courage to feel imperfect. They need to see us sweat, see us fail, and see us recover: see us fall down seven times and get up eight. We need to be real for them so they can truly be themselves.

At Ruyton our focus on continually reviewing our wellbeing programs, increasing our opportunities for mindfulness, and providing opportunities for mentoring and coaching, are all important as we grow our girls. We need to champion them, introduce them to opportunities, and lift them up to help them to achieve what’s really possible for them. We also need to support them to learn from times of failure and lack of self-belief. We all need to focus on supporting our girls to be brave and true to themselves.

‘Understanding the difference between healthy striving and perfectionism is critical to laying down the shield and picking up your life. Research shows that perfectionism hampers success. In fact, it’s often the path to depression, anxiety, addiction, and life paralysis.’ Dr Brené Brown, The Gifts of Imperfection: Let Go of Who You Think You’re Supposed to Be and Embrace Who You Are.

To learn more about Ruyton, click here to see their School Choice profile: Ruyton Girls’ School

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees: 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » School News » Ruyton believes in girls

Ruyton believes in girls


 

Excitement over the Olympics was at fever pitch at Ruyton. In addition to the Junior School girls participating in their own Mini Olympics, they also had a particular interest in an Olympian who was representing Australia.

The school is very proud of the efforts of Kim Brennan (Crow ’03) who won a gold medal in the Women’s Single Sculls at the 2016 Olympics in Rio, where she led all the way in the final race. Kim was also chosen to be the flag bearer at the closing ceremony. She competed at the 2012 London Olympics (winning a silver and bronze medal) and the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Throughout her Olympic campaign Kim has always displayed integrity. Her remarks post-race about giving back should serve as a mantra to every Olympic athlete, as well as to every Ruyton girl.

Kim’s Olympic performance reduced many, including Kim herself, to tears. Australia as a nation has excelled at placing enormous pressure on the shoulders of high achievers. For so many in the Ruyton community who had the privilege of knowing Kim during her youth, it was the journey of everything Ruyton girls represent: the well-rounded individual, grit and determination, a struggle to overcome setbacks, strong values of integrity, compassion, fairness and courage. Kim won the hearts of many through her victory, but it was her strong stance on the value of team and nation in uniting people to see hope; highlighting the possibility of ascending from an intolerable social divide; displaying courage beyond words, demonstrating the importance of patience, integrity and humility and making a difference in the lives of others, that struck a chord with so many. The girls were excited and honoured to welcome Kim in a surprise visit to the school at the end of Term 3.

In a country where the tall poppy syndrome is both endemic and defeating, it is a problem we need to face. Ruyton girls will always know they have a community that is on their side; that supports them with a wholehearted sense of pride to be the best versions of themselves; a community that invests strongly in their future and believes in their ability to make ripples or life-changing waves; a community that acknowledges sincere effort and endeavour. The sense of pride in all of the girls is as strong as the school’s belief in their ability to dig deep, do their best and make a real difference.

Publish By
Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees: 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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History of The Kilmore International School


Extra Curricular Sports at Wahroonga Adventist School


Roseville College Leads the State in Food Technology


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Senior Contemporary Dance Program


Three nebulae, as seen from ELTHAM College’s Observatory


Embracing life in the ‘100-acre classroom’


John Monash Science School Regional Science Exchange


Recognising our High Achievers


Home » School News » Crossing New Horizons

Crossing New Horizons


 

The New Horizons program at Ruyton Girls’ School focuses on a progression of experiences outside the classroom, which encourages personal growth to help embrace the challenges of our dynamic modern society. Adventure and challenge allow the individual to develop a greater understanding of their strength and character: the importance of being a positive, active member of a community with a practical understanding of the natural world.

The Junior School camps give the girls the opportunity to develop a sense of belonging and there is a focus on connecting with the natural world. Year 3 girls catch Puffing Billy to Wombat Corner in Emerald – a fantastic way to start a camp. Year 4 girls travel to a camp at Anglesea, where there is emphasis on team building and developing confidence. At Sovereign Hill Year 5 girls explore the natural world through hands on activities and study the history of the Australian gold rush, while wearing period dress. Year 6 girls tour Canberra, consolidating knowledge acquired in the classroom and helping it to come alive. In Senior School, from Year 7 camp through to the opportunity to display leadership in Year 11 and Year 12, each experience is designed to allow the girls to consolidate their skills and knowledge.

In Year 8 there are two expeditions, one in Term 1 to build on the Year 7 camp experience and one in Term 4, to develop specific outdoors skills in preparation for the Year 9 camp. Entitled the Summit Program, this is an important personal development initiative, culminating in a major expedition at the end of Year 9 for all girls.

By Year 10 the girls are able to select from a range of experiences, specifically an expedition to Central Australia, a rafting trip and an exchange to a school overseas (locations now include schools in the UK, France, Canada, the USA, New Zealand and China).

By Year 11 and 12 the girls work together to create positive, inclusive communities and foster leadership.

The Snowy River rafting trip – a true adventure

A group of Year 10 girls, a bunch of river guides, Mr S and Ms G shared an adventure on the Snowy River late last year. The trip started in New South Wales and finished in East Gippsland. A total distance of 123km of the river was rafted, a little over 100 major rapids negotiated (in fine rafting style) all taking a total of 10 days.

The rapids provided the high-end adventure of the trip. Many of the bigger ones had names, such as George’s Mistake and the Washing Machine! Over the first few days on the river we all learnt how the water moves as it is forced down between the rocks and drops. We also learnt what to do with our paddles and raft to avoid swims and flips. Most of this came down to teamwork: picking the right ‘line’ down is a skill, and one that was developed by all.

The trip also offered other opportunities. The section of river rafted is remote, with little access. It is wilderness. There was no phone coverage, no Wi-Fi, no regular plumbing, no electricity. In many ways life on the river was a lot simpler: it was good to disconnect from the modern digital world for a while and enjoy the ‘here and now’ of the trip.

Everything for 22 people to live and travel on the river needed to be organised and carried on the rafts. Food, tents, tarps, cooking gear, personal gear, repair kits, dry bags, wetsuits, Personal Flotation Devices, helmets … there was no room for excess luggage! This is a unique way to live and offers many challenges. It only works when everyone pitches in.

The highlight of this trip for me was the way in which the girls embraced all the challenges and were able to enjoy and appreciate the experience. For 10 days we saw no other people. We were independent and able to rely on each other. It was a real and memorable adventure.

Mr Darren Saunder, director of Outdoor Education

Publish By
Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees: 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
School Search


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History of The Kilmore International School


Extra Curricular Sports at Wahroonga Adventist School


Roseville College Leads the State in Food Technology


Lessons Learnt from Remote Teaching and Learning


Senior Contemporary Dance Program


Three nebulae, as seen from ELTHAM College’s Observatory


Embracing life in the ‘100-acre classroom’


John Monash Science School Regional Science Exchange


Recognising our High Achievers


Home » » Storypark

Storypark


 

Storypark is an online community portal for updating parents on student learning. Creating partnerships with families in order to communicate their children’s learning is an important aspect within our centre.

Teachers in our Early Learning, together with the Digital Learning Mentor of Early Learning and the Junior School, undertook research to engage more effectively with families and to collaborate with them about their children’s learning. The online portal, Storypark, was chosen to be trialled.

We have been pleased with how our community has engaged with this initiative and parents are also sharing, through comments and photos, the learning the children achieve outside of Ruyton’s Early Learning. As the trial has progressed parents have increasingly commented on their child’s activities, both within and outside the Early Learning environment. There is still the opportunity to document and highlight the essence of the program in traditional ways, but Storypark offers an instant link to parents and grandparents alike, which they can access. This is another example of digital devices and technology being integrated seamlessly into our programs to enhance a student’s learning experience and parents’ insights into this. Storypark has been so successful as a tool for collaboration and communication, we are exploring ways in which it can be extended to the other Early Learning groups at Ruyton.

Here is an example of how Storypark works:

The Henny Penny Hatching Program has arrived

At lunchtime today the girls were very excited to see the chickens and eggs arrive. “Oh they are soo cute,” said Alexandra. The three chicks were placed in the brooding box in the curious garden with some food, water and a light for heat. The 12 eggs were placed in an incubator and we now watch and wait to see them hatch over the coming days.

Comments:

Steven (parent)

‘Welcome to the world, little chicks! They are so cute!

Are they keeping warm?

What are they eating?’

Mrs W (Girls’ Pre Prep teacher)

“Thanks for these great questions, Steven. I asked the girls for their answers.”

They are in a hot cage,” said Chloe F.

They are eating seeds,” said Natalie.

They are in an incubator,” said Georgia.

“Just like they were under their mummy hen’s bottom,” said Eloise.

“They are very cute now, though they were wet when they came out,” said Emerson.

Ms Teresa Wojcik, acting director of Early Learning

Publish By
Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees: 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
School Search


News & Advice
Leaders in Learning Excellence


History of The Kilmore International School


Extra Curricular Sports at Wahroonga Adventist School


Roseville College Leads the State in Food Technology


Lessons Learnt from Remote Teaching and Learning


Senior Contemporary Dance Program


Three nebulae, as seen from ELTHAM College’s Observatory


Embracing life in the ‘100-acre classroom’


John Monash Science School Regional Science Exchange


Recognising our High Achievers