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Home » Education Advice » A parent’s guide to starting Primary School in Australia

A parent’s guide to starting Primary School in Australia


Starting primary school in Australia is a big milestone for children and families. It can be an exciting or a challenging time.

When does Primary School start in Australia?

Primary school is usually from Kindergarten (or ‘Kindy’) till year 6.

Whilst the correct age to start primary school varies by state, children usually begin at the age of 5 or 6.

To attend primary school, the child needs to be 5 years old before the cut-off to attend school.

Current cut-off dates in Australia

New South Wales (NSW) – 31 July

Victoria (VIC) and Australian Capital Territory (ACT) – 30 April

Queensland (QLD), Western Australia (WA) and Northern Territory (NT) – 30 June

South Australia (SA) – 1 May

Tasmania (TAS) – 1 January

When should I send my child to Primary School?

If your child is born before the cut-off date of a state, they have the option to be one of the older kids in the grade or one of the younger ones.

For example, if Jayden is born on the 24th of April, he can start school in NSW at the age of 4 years and 9 months. Jayden may also attend school the following year at the age of 5 years and 9 months where he will be one of the older students.

So which one is a better fit?

Selecting the right year of entry into primary school is a difficult decision for parents. There is no correct answer.

You may wish to consider the following when deciding whether your child is ready for big school:

1. Notice your child’s development

Most of the decision should depend on your child and how they are going.

Knowledge and cognitive ability

Think about your child’s cognitive skills.

When starting primary school in Australia your child should have a basic understanding of numbers and counting.

Have a conversation with your child and gauge whether they can understand stories and demonstrate thinking and reasoning skills. You may consider their ability to complete puzzles, sort and match objects or identify colours and shapes.

starting primary school in australia. puzzle pieces.

Another recommendation to look at is their ability to wait their turn and share toys and equipment.

Maturity level

Your child should be at the level to manage their emotions at school. This includes focusing on tasks, following instructions and being in the new primary school environment.

Your child should be able to understand the rules and interact with teachers correctly.

Language

It is important your child is able to talk and listen to adults and other children when beginning school.

Make sure they are able to speak clearly to communicate their needs.

A good rule of thumb is to review whether your child can understand and retell simple stories.

Independence

Your child is going to be away from you for new and long periods of time.

If they are looking to start school, they should be able to manage their belongings, eat and drink and go to the bathroom without your supervision.

2. Speak to your child’s preschool teachers

Your child’s preschool or early learning centre teachers will have an understanding on where your child sits for the above skills.

Speak with them about your child’s development and whether they may benefit from waiting another year.

Checklist for starting Primary School in Australia

First day of Primary School bag essentials

  • Packed recess and lunch that is easy to eat and open

  • Pack water bottle

  • Stationery (ask the school to provide a list of required equipment)

  • Spare underwear, socks and clothing

Tip: Give your child a tour of their bag and explain where everything is. Otherwise, try and get them to help pack their school bag.

Attending the first day of Primary School

  • Give your child confidence and allow them to dress themselves if they can

  • Tie your child’s hair out of their face securely

  • Apply sunscreen

  • Make sure you have an area to park/wait so you are not late to pick them up

  • Let your child and their teacher know who will be picking them up

After their day in Primary School

  • Communicate with care and kindness

  • Ask them how their day was

  • Ask them to recall school events throughout the day

  • Validate their feelings and experiences

  • Ask them about any friends they made

  • Ask their teacher about their behaviour and development

How can I ensure a smooth transition for starting Primary School in Australia?

‘Preschool’ is a great way to prepare your child for ‘big school’.

A great way to ensure a smooth and easy transition into primary school is to send your child to early learning at their ‘big school’.

Alphington Grammar School, Victoria, has an Early Learning Centre (‘ELC’), for children aged 3-5 to develop and grow.

At Alphington Grammar School, our youngest students develop the building blocks of learning in our dedicated ELC. Inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach, our ELC teachers use spontaneous learning experiences and intentional teaching to scaffold and extend learning.

Throughout the week the children participate in school events and specialist programs including physical education, music, dance, library, Greek language immersive learning and bush adventuring. Active participation built on children’s curiosities ensures a solid foundation for a lifelong love of learning and a smooth transition into their Primary schooling journey.

Ms Danielle Munro, Early Learning Centre Leader

Preparing for Primary School at home

There are lots of activities for parents to try out with their child before starting primary school in Australia.

The NSW Government’s E-book recommends practicing the following 3 skills:

1. Speaking and listening

This is important so your child can socialise, make friends and participate at school.

  • Have conversations with them

  • Ask your child to recall events that happen throughout the day

2. Reading

Children mostly learn to read at school. However it is good for parents to show their child how books work:

  • Read to your child

  • Choose books they will find fun with ‘silly’ or rhyming sentences

  • Ask them to engage with the book (For example, “The cat is hiding behind the chair”. You may like to ask your child, “where is the cat hiding?”). This will help engage their comprehension skills.

3. Drawing and writing

  • Ask your child to draw or write about things they like

  • Help them draw or write something for a friend or family member

starting primary school in australia. fathers day card.

Remember to take care of your own wellbeing!

Being a parent is hard work. Remember to take time to practice self-care during this transition period for the family.

Need help finding or enrolling in a school?

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » School News » Schools in NSW trialling extended hours

Schools in NSW trialling extended hours


The New South Wales government is trialling extended school hours. Eight schools are participating in the trial aimed to suit the needs of parents and students.

The extended school hours aim to offer greater support to working parents managing their commitments.

“The reality is that the traditional school day, like the 9 to 5 workday, is a 20th century concept which may not be the best model for 21st century families, schools and the community”, said Ms Mitchell, Minister for Education and Early Learning.

Are NSW school hours extending?

The schools in NSW trialling extended school hours will not impact class time for students.

“What we are doing is finding ways to better support students and make it easier for working parents to manage their commitments.”

Premier Dominic Perrottet announced the schools will partner with community organisations, local businesses and sporting clubs.

school sporting  club

Photo by Adrià Crehuet Cano on Unsplash

Kids will have access to ‘a range of high quality activities’ outside the standard 9:00 am to 3:00 pm school day.

Why are schools in NSW trialling extended hours?

Mr Perrottet aims to provide options outside of standard school hours for working parents balancing family life.

“We want to offer greater support and comfort to parents, knowing that their kids are safe and happy taking part in a homework club in the school library, a dance class in the school hall or soccer practice on the school oval.”

Current extended hours in schools

Many schools currently offer extra curricular activities to meet parent needs.

Schools are reinventing the traditional school day through breakfast clubs, homework and study facilities, or sport and arts programs existing outside of school hours.

“This research pilot will give us a better understanding of what schools are already doing, and how we can expand on or implement effective practices at similar schools.”

Ms Mitchell, Minister for Education and Early Learning

The trial is particularly aimed at school sites that are under utilised.

When does the trial extending school hours in NSW start?

The trial will run in Terms 3 and 4 for 20 weeks.

The 8 schools in NSW trialling extended hours are:

  • Cawdor Public School

  • Hanwood Public School

  • Hastings Secondary College

  • Kentlyn Public School

  • Matraville Soldier’s Settlement Public School

  • Orange High School

  • Spring Hill Public School

  • Tacking Point Public School

Summary of schools in NSW trialling extended hours:

  • 8 schools in NSW are trialling extended hours.
  • The extended hours do not change classroom hours. They aim to provide parents with help outside of the 9:00 am to 3:00 pm school day.
  • The trial will take place with the help of community organisations, local business and sporting clubs.
  • The trial will run in Terms 3 and 4 for 20 weeks.
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Home » Education Advice » The importance of sports in education

The importance of sports in education


Many parents and children overlook school sports from a certain age. However, physical activity and sports is a fundamental element of education.

Your child’s sports participation in school can provide many benefits outside of physical health.

At Barker, we are committed to providing appropriate, diverse and challenging sporting programs to all students at the School. The reason for this is simple. Involvement in sport not only assists students physically and mentally; it creates opportunities for students to develop character, values and lifelong skills such as time management, teamwork and communication.

Mr Cam Anderson, Head of Sport at Barker College

Why do we need sports in education?

Sports in education can effectively contribute to your child’s weekly physical activity. Participating in sports at school has many other associated benefits.

Wellbeing

Participating in physical activity is central to your child’s emotional and mental wellbeing.

Playing sports between 1 and 3 times a week is reported to reduce psychological distress by 34%, whilst participating in sports 4 or more times a week reduces psychological distress by 47%.

Physical activity increases self-esteem and reduces stress and anxiety.

Sports in education will also help your child:

  • Sleep better

  • Improve their concentration at school and throughout the day

  • Boost their energy levels

Australia’s physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines provide physical activity recommendations for different age groups.

Children and young people are recommended to participate in at least 1 hour of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day. At least 3 days a week, children and young -people are encouraged to participate in muscle-strengthening activities.

Many are offered in sports at school including football, basketball, swimming, netball or running.

Providing balance at school

Students at school have different interests and strengths.

Sports in education may benefit children who do better in sports than the classroom.

“We believe by providing an extensive sports program we are actively promoting a healthy lifestyle and a nice balance between schoolwork and physical activity. This is imperative for the wellbeing of some of our students who thrive on the sports field a little more than they do in the classroom.”

Aaron Ayre, Director of Sports at Caroline Chisholm Catholic College

Sports in education provides your child with skills to become more well rounded.

“Overall, we believe that the opportunities we provide in our sports program aid students in becoming well rounded people who are able to juggle school commitments as well as sports passions.”

Children can develop and grow without sitting in a classroom all day. Research shows that schools which offer more sports have higher test scores and graduation rates amongst students.

Team Building and unity

Teamwork amongst children allows them to strengthen their cooperation and social skills.

For these students looking to socialise outside the classroom, team sports provides a network.

Teamwork is a very important life skill for children to carry outside of the sports field. A 2009 study revealed 57% of business leaders attributed their career success to participation in youth sports.

Similarly, sports in education allow for unity amongst students. Students from different backgrounds and social groups have the opportunity to work towards a common goal.

“We aim to provide a way for every student in the school to participate in sport across the year to not only promote a healthy lifestyle but also help build our school spirit.”

Aaron Ayre, Director of Sports at Caroline Chisholm Catholic College

Cognitive Development

Childhood and youth is an important and sensitive period for cognitive development.

Research demonstrates a correlation between sports participation and cognitive function in children.

sports in education. sports field. fencing at barker college.

According to Brain Boost from the Government of Western Australia, different studies show:

  • On average, academic achievement of children with extra physical education is higher

  • Participation in sports resulted in improved reading comprehension

  • Physical activity led to improved children’s maths scores

  • The cognitive benefits of physical activity were maintained over time.

In fact, children ‘can spend less time on academic learning, and more time being physically active during the school day without affecting their academic success or progress.’

Discipline

Sports in education also help enforce discipline amongst children by:

  • Providing a physical outlet

  • Self-discipline to achieve goals and physical challenges

  • Requiring a dedicated time to train and play

Research reveals children who played structured sports were better at ‘following instructions’ and ‘remaining focused in the classroom.’

Sports in the curriculum

Mandatory sports in education are incorporated in the NSW and VIC teaching and learning curriculums.

Many schools offer an option of competitive/representative school sports and sports at school.

“We compete in the SACCSS sports competition against other Catholic Colleges in the area which forms our school representative teams. While these teams are based on a selection process, we also provide House sport opportunities for all students to further facilitate increasing participation.

Volleyball, Soccer and Basketball are the most popular sports however there is also a growing appetite for Badminton, AFL and Table Tennis.”

Aaron Ayre, Director of Sports at Caroline Chisholm Catholic College

Does my child need to play sports outside of school?

In Victoria, only 6 out of 10 children between 5-14 participated in sport outside of school.

Sports in education is a great way to achieve physical activity, however there is no harm in carving out time for extra activity during the week.

Whilst some sports schools provide specialised training, many private schools encourage independent sporting as well.

“Our training sessions and games are played within school hours or shortly after school, enabling students to travel to other sporting clubs for training. This allows for students to actively pursue their own individual sporting goals and opportunities outside of their College life.”

Aaron Ayre, Director of Sports at Caroline Chisholm Catholic College

Many schools also run or host sport workshops in the school holidays.

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » Education Advice » 6 Practical Tips for Moving Schools

6 Practical Tips for Moving Schools


Whilst moving schools is quite common, it can be a big change for families. Parents, children and families all need to settle in when it comes to moving schools.

6 Practical tips for moving schools

1. Put together a collection of your child’s relevant documents

The NSW Department of Education suggests putting together a ‘student portfolio’ for teachers at the new school.

This may include recent reports, recent transcripts (such as the most recent NAPLAN data), samples of their work and other relevant information and other relevant information.

Having this all put together allows the new teacher(s) to gauge your child’s abilities and understand the work they have been doing to ensure a smooth transition.

2. Take a tour of the school

A great way to understand the culture at your child’s new school is to take a tour or have a trial day before your child officially begins.

Visiting the school beforehand allows families to get a feel for the students, teachers and campus.

Your child will also have the opportunity to familiarise themselves with the new campus.

Things you may ask the school during a school visit:

  • If you are unable to take a tour of the school beforehand, ask the school for a map.

  • Depending on your child, you may ask if there is any way for your child to meet some classmates before the school. Alternatively, you may ask to arrange a ‘buddy’ on the first day of school.

  • Ask if there are any online parent platforms or in-person groups you can join.

  • Ask if the school offers any extracurricular activities for before and after school.

  • Ask for a school calendar with a list of the events.

  • Ask the school if your child will be receiving their timetable before or on their first day.

  • Ask about homework expectations and homework clubs or study sessions the school provides if your child needs help.

3. Arrange your child’s before and after school routine

Discover school facilities or programs available

If you are working during the weekday, do some research about after school facilities near the school or after-school programs or extracurriculars the school may offer.

Speak to your child about whether any of these interests them and what the new routine might look like.

Organise transport arrangements

Alternatively, you may seek transport arrangements for your child.

Build a new routine together by looking at buses, trains, potential drop-off points or the school’s private transport service.

Tip: Ask the school if they have their own pick-up and drop-off points for parents.

4. Make sure your child has the support they need

Make sure you ask the school about any specific support your child requires so they can make appropriate arrangements.

It is a good idea to let the school know if your child:

  •  Has learning disabilities, physical disabilities, mental health issues or is an ESL student.
  • Has had past difficulties settling in and making friends.
  • Any dietary requirements or allergies if you have not been given the opportunity to disclose this.

5. Make sure you have purchased all the new school supplies

Ask the new school about textbooks or workbooks your child may need for class(es) and make sure you have them ready by the first day.

school supplies. 6 practical tips for moving schools.

Remember to order the new school uniform in advance.

Tip: It may be helpful to ask the school for a list of supplies your child will need to have for their first day.

6. Helping your child cope with moving schools

Prepare them before moving schools

  • Discuss the move as early as possible

It is important to begin discussing moving schools as soon as you can. This allows your child to have more opportunity to process the event.

This is particularly important as many children are reluctant to change.

  • Understand their concerns

Since children spend the majority of their week at school, moving schools can change their whole life.

It is normal for your child to have concerns. They may be worried about making new friends, leaving teachers they like, or navigating the campus.

Take some time to hear and acknowledge their worries and concerns.

  • Get the family excited about moving schools 

Get excited and enthusiastic for moving schools and try to avoid dwelling on your concerns.

Discuss with your child what they can look forward to at their new school.

Ask them to consider what they are excited about. They may be excited about having a fresh start, having a different school uniform or new extracurricular opportunities.

  • Get them involved 

If you are still in the process of choosing a school, let them join in!

You may wish to compare different schools and see which one best suits your child and the family.

Private schools offer many niche electives, programs and facilities in NSW and Victoria.

  • Don’t isolate them with the community they’ve created 

Make a list of your child’s school friends and their contact details. Try to make an effort to arrange visits with their old friends after they move schools.

Ensuring they will have the opportunity to see or contact their friends will make it easier to move schools.

Check to see if they are settling in after moving schools

  • Get in touch with the school 

Contact your child’s teacher or year coordinator a few weeks after to see how they are fitting in.

If they are not adjusting to the change as expected, ask the school to provide tips to help.

  • Have another discussion with your child

Have another discussion with your child and see how they are going after the move.

Take time to acknowledge worries and concerns they may still have.

How much say does my child have in moving schools?

Parents may be concerned if their child may be severely upset about moving schools.

“I certainly think it’s important to get their input, not necessarily have the burden of the decision put on them.”

Dr Andrew Greenfield, Child and Educational Psychologist, believes some younger children may not be able to come up with any real advantage to moving schools.

“From year 3 onward I think it’s important to have their input because they’re the ones who have to live in that environment. The problem is they don’t know what it really is gonna be like a lot of the time in a new school and environment.”

When is the best time to move schools?

Families often have a major need or good reasons for moving schools. However, if you do have the luxury of deciding when your child should move schools, Dr Greenfield suggests the middle years when other kids are moving schools.

“More often than not it’s done in year 5 or year 7 because there are kids moving schools around that time. Obviously year 7 because lots of kids change schools then anyway, so it’s a new experience.”

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » School News » Roseville College’s Learning Festival 2022

Roseville College’s Learning Festival 2022


Roseville College’s annual ‘Learning Festival’ will be returning in 2022. Roseville College’s Learning Festival provides parents and families with the wonderful opportunity to visit Roseville College and see learning in action and experience the warmth of their community.

What is the Learning Festival?

The Learning Festival is an open day where prospective families have the opportunities to visit the Roseville College campus and meet the students and staff.

Parents can learn more about Roseville College’s approach to K-12 learning with an interactive and festive day on campus.

From music to drama, science to art, sport to history, food and coffee stalls, and a petting zoo there will be lots to see and do.

Things to do at Roseville College’s Learning Festival

Join a student-led tour

At Roseville College’s Learning Festival you will have an opportunity to meet their Registrar and join a student-led tour of our campus!

Their Registrar will be available on the day to answer any enrolment enquiries you may have.

Where to go: Visit the Registrar’s tent for more information.

Meet the staff

Roseville College wants to help families discover more about the College and the breadth of opportunities it has to offer.

The team welcomes the opportunity to speak with you and answer any questions you might have.

So where’s our invite?

Roseville College invites you to visit them for the Learning Festival on Saturday 21 May from 12pm – 4pm at 27 Bancroft Avenue, Roseville 2069.

roseville college's learning festival. invitation to open day.

To learn more about what to expect, visit Roseville College’s website.

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Home » Education Advice » What are Independent Schools in Australia?

What are Independent Schools in Australia?


Independent schools are non-profit institutions that cater to a variety of communities and students with unique values. Independent schools are a great option for parent’s looking to personalise their child’s education to values at home.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, enrolments to Independent schools increased by 3.6% in 2021.

Independent schools make up approximately 1,187 of the 9,679 schools in Australia.

Independent Schools Australia’s School Choice research report in 2021 revealed that many parents are seeking education further to academic results.

“They are looking for schools to play a part in their child’s personal development, prepare them for employment and provide skills that will be used throughout life.”

Independent Schools Australia School Choice: A Research Report 2021

What is the difference between private schools and independent schools in Australia?

A private school in Australia is a non-government school. Independent schools are diverse non-government schools for a variety of communities.

There is some overlap between private and independent schools. In Australia, independent schools make up a percentage of private schools.

Around 17% of students attend independent schools in Australia.

Different Types of Independent Schools in Australia

Denominational Christian Schools

Many independent schools offer a religious education.

Independent schools affiliating with Christian denominations include:

Seventh-Day Adventist

Seventh-Day Adventist schools are often owned and operated by the Seventh-Day Adventist Church.

Adventist Education is the largest protestant schooling system in the world.

Adventist Education is offered at a range of different schools throughout Australia.

Catholic

In NSW, one in five students have a Catholic education.

The official role of Catholic Schools NSW, is to ‘support the Bishops of NSW in bringing to life the Church’s evangelising mission through Catholic Schools.’

Visit here, to find a school in New South Wales.

The Catholic Education Commission of Victoria educates approximately 207,000 students within Victoria.

Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of Melbourne offer the best education possible, equipping our young people with the knowledge, skills and hope to flourish and enrich the world.

Our holistic approach to education enriches the intellectual, physical, spiritual, and emotional lives of students, which research has shown adds an average of six points to tertiary admission ranks and leads to higher average household income.

Melbourne Archdiocese Catholic Schools

Visit here, to find a school in Victoria.

Anglican

Anglican education refers to education services provided by the Anglican Church of Australia.

The main difference between Anglican and Catholic schools is that Anglican schools are established by the Church of England.

There are approximately 155 Anglican schools in Australia, educating around 155,000 students.

Uniting Church

The Uniting Church in Australia synod’s oversee schools committed to ‘upholding and articulating the ethos of the United Church’.

MLC School’s culture and expectations have long been informed by Christian spirituality and values fostered through its Methodist roots, now strongly reflected in its close alignment with the Uniting Church in Australia.

The School prides itself in its multicultural, multilingual as well as multi-faith environment.

MLC School, New South Wales

In the Synod of Victoria and Tasmania, there are 12 schools.

  • Schools within the Uniting Church in Australia, Synod of Victoria and Tasmania

In NSW and ACT, there are 9 uniting Church schools providing education to approximately 10,000 students.

  • Schools within the Uniting Church in Australia, Synod of NSW and ACT

Greek Orthodox

Most Greek Orthodox educational institutions operate under the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese emphasising their Orthodox Christian religion and values.

Orthodox education aims to guide students into the mystery of Jesus Christ, through teaching the whole person; mind, body and soul. Through learning, one naturally draws nearer to Jesus Christ, the source of wisdom. Loving God results in loving and serving one’s fellow person and respecting God’s creation. Serving our fellow human person is an expression of the love of the Holy Trinity.

Fr Peter Mavrommatis, Principal, St Euphemia College

Visit here, for New South Wales schools.

Visit here, for Victoria schools.

Presbyterian

There are a few schools of the Presbyterian Church of Australia which encourage students to develop a Christian worldview.

The Presbyterian Church in NSW operates two schools in Sydney and five schools in regional centres, each with its own unique style and designed to serve the needs of their communities. Our schools are committed to distinctively Christian beliefs, values and educational practices in a way that educates the whole child and prepares them for a successful future. This Christian foundation is our motivation to integrate faith, learning, work and service to honour God with excellence in all that we do.”

Presbyterian Church of Australia in the state of New South Wales

Non-denominational Christian Schools

Christian Schools were established by Protestant Churches and parents to provide students with education delivered from a Christian worldview.

“Our schools were established by parents to ensure their children would receive a quality education in a nurturing Christian environment. Our schools model beliefs and values that are consistent with the Christian faith, whilst adhering to the national curriculum. Our schools are low fee, independent and are accountable to their parent and school communities. Our families are from a wide range of backgrounds but recognise the great benefits of Christian education.”

Australian Association of Christian Schools

Islamic schools

Islamic schools commit to the education of Muslim children whilst fulfilling their spiritual and educational needs.

Islamic schools in Victoria:

  • Australian International Academy King Khaled Primary Campus (AIAKKPC)

  • Australian International Academy Melbourne Secondary Campus

  • East Preston Islamic College

  • Ilim College of Australia

  • Minaret College

  • Mt Hira School

  • Islamic College of Melbourne

  • Darul Ulum College of Victoria

  • Al-Taqwa College

Islamic schools in NSW:

  •  Arkana College

  • Australian International Academy (AIA)  Sydney Campus

  • Australian Islamic College of Sydney

  • Al-Amanah College

  • Al Hikma College

  • Al-Noori Muslim School

  • Al-Sadiq College

  • Al-Sadiq College

  • Al-Zahra College

  • Al Faisal College

  • Bellfield College

  • Green Valley Islamic College

  • Iqra Grammar College

  • Malek Fahd Islamic School

  • Qibla College

  • Rissalah College

  • Unity Grammar College

  • Western Grammar School

  • Salamah College

  • Sule College

Jewish schools

Jewish schools in Australia seek to uphold Jewish values alongside education.

To find a Jewish school in Australia, click here.

Grammar schools

In Australia, many grammar schools are independent. Grammar schools typically select students based on academic merit or interview.

“At International Grammar School (IGS), students are taught in many languages from the age of 3. IGS celebrates the values of diversity, vibrancy, authenticity, connectedness and personal achievement.”

International Grammar School

International Grammar School. school kids learning languages. independent schools in Australia.

Credit: International Grammar School

How are independent schools in Australia funded?

All schools in Australia, including independent schools, receive government funding.

According to the Australian Government Department of Education, Skills and Employment, sources of funding in the Independent sector are:

  • Australian government funding 39%;

  • State government funding 11%; and

  • School fees from parents and contributions from the community funding 50%.

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

 

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Home » Education Advice » What to do after your child receives disappointing exam results

What to do after your child receives disappointing exam results


 

Receiving lower than expected exam results can feel shocking or devastating for your child. It is important for parents to approach disappointing exam results positively to help their child improve.

Why did my child receive disappointing exam results?

Kids can fail exams for a variety of reasons.

Common reasons may include:

  • Lack of interest in the material

  • Distraction when studying

  • ‘Text Anxiety’

  • Poor time management and procrastination

  • Lack of confidence or overconfidence

There could also be underlying reasons a student is not motivated at school over a prolonged period. This may include underlying learning disabilities such as autism or dyslexia or mental health conditions including ADHD, anxiety, depression or OCD.

What to do after your child receives disappointing exam results

Eden Foster, College Psychologist at St Aloysius College, Victoria discusses the best approach is to ‘develop a growth mindset’.

A child who has a fixed mindset will have the belief that a poor grade on an exam or assessment suggests that they cannot do well in the respective subject and is more likely to give up and see failure as something irreversible and inevitable for them.

Parents can take the following steps to boost confidence and approach disappointing exam results positively:

1. Praise your child for their efforts

Stanford Psychologist, Carol Dweck’s research demonstrated praising ‘process not outcome’ is a key to developing a growth mindset.

Praising your child for their academic efforts is just as important as praising them for their results.Recognising your child’s effort will motivate and encourage them for future exams, assessments or homework.

Your child will learn the connection between the amount of effort they put in and the results they achieve.

Praising your child’s effort can look like praising their concentration, self-correction or study techniques.

Eden believes focusing on your child’s results may lead to a fear of failure and task avoidance.

2. Creating the best study conditions at home

Creating good study conditions at home may help your child with distractions and battling exam stress.

Create a dedicated study space that is quiet, organised and away from distractions.

You may wish to set boundaries with your child about the use of technology or phones in their study space.

3. Seeking help from teachers and wellbeing staff

Encourage your child to seek help from teachers or wellbeing staff following their exam results.

Praising your child for seeking feedback from staff will help them improve their grades.

It also helps your child build a good relationship with their teacher and feel more comfortable to ask for help before the next assessment.

4. Help with organisation

If your child is struggling with their organisation you may wish to set up a calendar or study plan.

  • Make sure to write in assessment or homework due-dates

  • Encourage them to make a to-do list where they can mark off each task

  • Help them create a study timetable which also schedules in wellbeing activities

5. Encourage them to use their feedback to improve

A popular study technique is to note the mistakes from the last exam and re-do those questions everyday until they are completely mastered.

For example, if your child gets a complex maths question wrong, have them write down the question in a separate note book and re-attempt it until they have learnt the correct working out.

Make sure your child asks teachers for further feedback until the next assessment so they are prepared. ’

What not to do after your child receives disappointing exam results

Don’t blow things out of proportion

It’s not the end of the world if your child has one disappointing result.

It’s important to help your child (and yourself) put these results into perspective. Does this one exam result mean my child will not succeed in life? Of course not, in fact failure is more likely to help your child succeed so long as they focus on what they have learnt in the process- what they did well and what they can improve on.

Eden Foster, College Psychologist, St Aloysius College, Melbourne

Help build their self-esteem and reward them for any efforts leading up to the next exam.

Don’t get angry or show disappointment

Your child is likely already disappointed in themselves. Try to show support and encourage a growth mindset.

child receives disappointing exam results. boy on computer.

Remind your child although they can’t change what happened, they can work towards learning from their mistakes.

Do not compare them or their marks to others

Child Psychologist from Sydney Child Psychology Services, Nidhi Dev advises that comparison puts excess pressure on kids.

Your child’s learning is unique and should be approached as such.

Comparing your child and putting them higher than other students can also be destructive. Carol Dweck’s growth mindset research has shown that students are more likely to see their ability as ‘fixed’ when they see themselves as the top achiever.

In a fixed mindset, a minor setback may be perceived as a complete failure.

Summary: Tips to help them stay on track after disappointing exam results

  • Reward their efforts

  • Encourage them to learn from their feedback

  • Remind them it is possible to achieve a different outcome in the future

  • Help them have an organised study space free from distractions

  • Make sure you are focusing on them, and not comparing them to others.

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » Education Advice » Financing your child’s private school tuition

Financing your child’s private school tuition


Many parents saving for their child’s education do not know how much they will need to save or the directions their child’s future may take.

Providing a good education for your child is an investment. An Australian Scholarships Group survey revealed that private school education costs approximately half a million dollars. Private school fees are rising at ‘double the inflation’ rate.

There are options for parents looking to get help financing their child’s private school tuition.

You need help financing your child’s private school tuition, where do you start?

Payment plans

Edstart

This program allows parents to pay private school invoices on time by the term.

  • This loan can be used every year.
  • It is designed to pay the full year of school fees over at a 12-month period.
  • There are a variety of weekly, fortnightly or monthly repayment options to choose from.

Minimum Loan amount: $2,001.00

Maximum Loan amount: No maximum limit

Service Fee: 3% of Facility Limit

Default Interest Rate: (charged when the facility is in arrears): 4%

Application Fee: $0

Dishonour Fee: $10

Repayment occurs: weekly, fortnightly or monthly

Edstart offers multiple payment plan options depending on the education costs and duration. It holds a credit licence issued by ASIC.

These may be use for any education-related costs including tuition fees, boarding expenses, uniforms, technology, and extracurricular activities.

All payment plans may be paid weekly, fortnight or monthly and apply at any time during the year. The customised payment plan options ensure parents do not borrow more than they need

Edstart does not require you to reapply for future years or pay any charges for changing or cancellation.

Edstart organises the payment before the due date after receiving the invoice.

Parents will then nominate a bank account, payment frequency and suitable start date.

Edstart Go

This payment plan is intended for ‘smaller education costs’, spreading payments for up to 12 months.

Features:

  • Funding minimum: $500
  • Funding maximum: $2,000
  • Interest: Interest free
  • Transaction fee: Nil
  • Account keeping fee (charged when your balance is above 0): $8/month
Edstart Pay

This payment plan is intended for ‘smaller education costs’ during the school year. Edstart pays your school every term.

Features:

  • Funding minimum:
  • Funding maximum: Over $2,000
  • Interest: Interest free
  • Transaction fee (charged each time Edstart pays your invoice): 3%
  • Account keeping fee: Nil
Edstart Extend

The extended repayments are for up to 5 years after finishing school. Edstart will pay the school every term.

  • Funding minimum:
  • Funding maximum: Over $2,000
  • Interest: 5.9% – 12.9%

Interest is only charged on the balance of your Edstart account. The interest rate is personalised based on your credit profile. If you have a good credit history, you will be awarded a better interest rate.

  • Transaction fee: 3%
  • Account keeping fee: Nil

Education Loans

Futurity Invest (formerly known as ‘Australian Scholarships Group (ASG)’)

Tuition Fee Loan

Futurity Invest provides a ‘tuition fee loan’ to cover the costs of private school fees for Australian students.

The tuition fee loan can also cover other education-related fees on the school’s invoice including levies, uniforms, textbooks, excursions or extra-curricular activities.

Parents can have a loan per school e.g. multiple children at one school would still be one loan.

Using the tuition fee loan parents can pay the invoices to schools online directly. Parents will need to make regular loan repayments to Futurity Invest over a 12 month period.

Futurity allows parents/carers to choose from two payment methods:

Tuition Instalment Loan

This program allows parents to pay private school invoices on time by the term.

  • This loan can be used every year.
  • It is designed to pay the full year of school fees over at a 12-month period.
  • There are a variety of weekly, fortnightly or monthly repayment options to choose from.

Minimum Loan amount: $2,001.00

Maximum Loan amount: No maximum limit

Service Fee: 3% of Facility Limit

Default Interest Rate: (charged when the facility is in arrears): 4%

Application Fee: $0

Dishonour Fee: $10

Repayment occurs: weekly, fortnightly or monthly

Tuition in Advance Loan

This program allows parents to pay private school invoices annually in advance to obtain a school fee discount.

·         This loan can be used every year.

·         It is designed to pay for the whole school year upfront.

·         There are a variety of weekly, fortnightly or monthly repayment options to choose from.

Minimum Loan amount: $2,001.00

Maximum Loan amount: No maximum limit

Service Fee: 6% of the loan drawdown amount

Default Interest Rate: (charged when the facility is in arrears): 4%

Application Fee: $0

Dishonour Fee: $10

Repayment occurs: weekly, fortnightly or monthly

financing your child's private school tuition. private school education. private school library.

The loan is a consumer loan regulated by the Consumer Credit Code. Futurity’s loans are a continuing credit contract that parents can draw down on an ongoing basis, similar to a credit card.

Education bonds

Education bonds allow for parents to begin saving and investing in their child’s future education.

Benefits of Futurity Education Bond’s:

Flexibility

·         Full control and access to your funds at any time

·         Ability to make ‘Education Benefit Claims’ and withdrawals for any purpose

·         Investment options from Australian and International leading fund managers

·         Add or remove individual or multiple beneficiaries at any time

·         Add a bond guardian

Tax Benefits

·         Money paid into the education bond does not attract any tax if planned correctly

·         Futurity pays tax on the bond’s ongoing investment earnings at a rate of up to 30% on your behalf

·         For every withdrawal made to fund education Futurity will refund the tax paid by them (extra $30 earned for every $70 withdrawn)

·         No annual tax reporting required

Dedicated Savings

·         Allows you to make lump sum or monthly contributions to maximise the benefits of compounding within a low tax environment

·         Dedicated education fund helps you stay on track towards your goals

Education Savings Fund

Australian Unity

Australian Unity established an Education Savings Fund to assist parents, grandparents or guardians save for education costs.

“It’s never really too late to start saving for ANY purpose, and the same philosophy applies to an education savings fund, also known as an Education Bond.  Obviously the sooner you start, the greater the potential benefit as the power of compounding returns (interest on your interest, and growth on your growth) can contribute greatly to the end balance, not just the deposits that are made.”

Greg Bird, Head of Strategy and Distribution, Life & Super at Australian Unity

It is designed to provide parents with flexibility to adjust their investment, and earn a return on their investment.

Parents can also claim most expenses related to a child’s education including accommodation, travel and equipment.

Parents can choose a default balanced investment option or choose from a range of investment options to suit your personal objectives and financial circumstances.

Features:

·         The product is classified under Australian tax law as a ‘scholarship plan’ so parents can benefit from tax concessions where investment earnings pay for education related expenses

It operates as a ’scholarship plan’ under Australian Tax laws, which means that it is eligible for a special type of tax concession which is generally not available for other investment products.  A tax deduction available to the fund is effectively passed onto you when earnings are used to pay for education expenses.  Whilst your investment earnings remain within the fund, there are no fund related annual tax return obligations for you or your nominated student,

Greg Bird, Head of Strategy and Distribution, Life & Super at Australian Unity

·         The Fund covers primary and secondary education

·         Parents can change their contribution at any time or withdraw money that is no longer being used for educational purposes

There are no fee’s associated with changing contributions or making withdrawals. As with most forms of investment, for some investors there may be tax consequences if earnings are withdrawn, subject to how long the fund has been in place.

·         You can choose a default balanced investment option or choose from a range of investment options to suit your personal objectives and financial circumstances

·         Establishment Fee: Nil

·         Contribution Fee: Nil

·         Withdrawal Fee: Nil

·         Exit Fee: Nil

·         Management Costs: 0.70% administration fee per annum. Investment management costs range between 0.25% to 1.04% per annum.

 The Education Bond is simply another option for parents/carer’s to consider.  A loan ultimately needs to be paid back, and even with the current low interest rate environment interest rates won’t stay low forever.

Traditional term deposits and award saver type accounts, are definitely appropriate where there is a very short term funding horizon and the security and liquidity of the funds is of paramount importance.  But if the aim is to grow funds over the longer term to cover future education expenses, then it is highly likely that that traditional bank account style investments will struggle to keep pace with the increasing costs of education each year.

Greg Bird, Head of Strategy and Distribution, Life & Super at Australian Unity

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Home » Education Advice » HSC vs International Baccalaureate: What is International Baccalaureate?

HSC vs International Baccalaureate: What is International Baccalaureate?


The HSC has been the main option for NSW students for years. The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme is slowly growing in Australian secondary schools as a credible alternative.

HSC vs International Baccalaureate: What is the difference?

HSC students aim for an ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admission Rank) as the standard measure of achievement. The HSC program is unique to NSW and each state has a different variation of the program (In Victoria, this is known as the VCE).

The main difference is that the HSC is designed to meet the needs of all NSW students whereas the IB pushes students to prepare for university. This is embedded in the diverse curriculum structure.

Features of the International Baccalaureate

  • Both years of the IB count.
  • IB students are required to study one subject from: the arts, sciences, humanities, mathematics, English and a foreign language.
  • The diploma is accepted by almost all universities and colleges.
  • Most IB subjects can be taken at “standard level” (SL) or “higher level” (HL).

HL courses are recommended to have at least 240 instructional hours and allow students to explore specific areas of personal interest in depth in addition to the core SL curriculum.

SL courses are recommended to have at least 150 instructional hours and allow students to experience a range of disciplines.

The assessment criteria are equally demanding for both levels which are integral to the Diploma Programme.

Curriculum Structure

  • Students are required to take at least 3 subjects at a HL and at least 3 subjects at a SL.
  • Therefore students must choose six subjects.
  • Students take 12 points from HL subjects and a minimum of 9 points from their SL subjects.

In addition to the 6 subjects, students must complete the following compulsory core elements:

  • Students must complete a 100-hour subject on the theory of knowledge and a 4000 word extended essay on a topic of their choice.
  • Students must participate in creative, sporting and service activities.

Features of the HSC

  • Preliminary (year 11) courses do not form part of the HSC ATAR.
  • The HSC offers a range of subjects from agriculture to extension physics with the only compulsory subject being English.
  • The subjects are scaled based on their varying levels of difficulty.
  • Students final marks in each subject are compared with other students to produce their final ATAR.

Curriculum Structure

  • Students must complete a minimum of 12 ‘units of study’ in year 11 and at least 10 units in year 12.
  • HSC students may choose from 27,000 course combinations and are required to take 2 units of English. This may include Standard English, Advanced English or ESL.

How does the International Baccalaureate apply to tertiary education?

Australia’s leading research universities (The Group of Eight), has collectively expressed its support for IB students.

Most tertiary institutions in Australia accept the International Baccalaureate diploma as an equivalent to an Australian Year 12 qualification. However, students are not guaranteed entry into courses and may have to meet additional requirements.

Most Australian higher education institutions have a scale in place to convert IB results to ATAR.

For students applying for university in 2023, the new IB/UAC conversion schedule will be published in May 2022.

Some universities even offer advanced placement, credit and bonus schemes for IB Diploma students.

Providing your IB Diploma results to UAC

Year 12 students must ensure UAC receives their IB diploma results. Students should:

  • Ask their school’s IB Diploma coordinator to authorise the International Baccalaureate to release their results directly to UAC. This must take place despite any other request for results to be sent to an institution; or
  • Alternatively, students must provide a copy of their official Results and Diploma Certificates when they become available.

Why would students choose to do an International Baccalaureate?

The International Baccalaureate Diploma is a suitable option for students looking to pursue international study.

Many universities and colleges overseas accept an IB. Each year over 5,000 universities in more than 100 countries receive IB students’ transcripts.

The degree of recognition of IB programmes vary from country to country.

Students should reach out to post-secondary institutions they are interested in and learn about how they recognise IB programmes.

For example, in the United States, there is no national ministry which controls university admission. Universities and colleges set their own policies. Students should explore the specific college’s requirements.

Generally, colleges require students to submit the written application for admission, a transcript of secondary school grades and a Scholastic Aptitude Test or American College test.

Is International Baccalaureate harder?

The IB and HSC provide different opportunities and experiences for different students.

Your child may find it more ‘difficult’ to begin focusing from Year 11. Alternatively, your child may find that accounting for both years of study in the final results removes the stress of Year 12.

The current IB conversions are quite generous. UAC data reveals approximately 5% of IB students last year received scores converting to an ATAR of 99.95, compared to 0.1% of HSC students.

The IB is academically vigorous and encourages independent learning.

However, if your child is considering undertaking the IB they must be academically well rounded due to the course curriculum structure. In the HSC, if your child is not as strong in maths or science, they would not be required to complete these subjects.

Schools in New South Wales that offer International Baccalaureate:

  • Al Zahra College
  • Aurora Southern Highlands Steiner School
  • Australian International Academy of Education, Kellyville Campus
  • Australian International Academy, Strathfield Campus
  • Central West Leadership Academy
  • Cranbrook School
  • Elonera Montessori School
  • German International School, Sydney
  • Kambala
  • Lycée Condorcet: The International French School of Sydney
  • MLC School
  • Monte Sant’ Angelo Mercy College
  • Newington College
  • Queenwood
  • Ravenswood School for Girls
  • Redlands
  • Santa Sabina College
  • St Andrew’s Cathedral School
  • St Paul’s Grammar School, Penrith
  • St Ursula’s College Kinsgrove
  • The Riverina Anglican College
  • Trinity Grammar School – Summer Hill Campus
  • Westbourne College Sydney

Schools in Victoria that offer International Baccalaureate:

  • Albert Park College
  • Auburn High School
  • Australian International Academy, Melbourne Senior Campus
  • Carey Baptist Grammar School
  • Creek Street Christian College
  • Geelong Grammar School
  • Grace Christian College Wodonga
  • Islamic College of Melbourne
  • Ivanhoe Grammar School
  • Kardinia International College
  • Lauriston Girls’ School
  • Mansfield Steiner School
  • Melbourne Montessori School
  • Methodist Ladies’ College
  • Presbyterian Ladies’ College – Melbourne
  • Preshil – the Margaret Lyttle Memorial School
  • Rivercrest Christian College
  • Sophia Mundi Steiner School
  • St Leonard’s College
  • Suzanne Cory High School
  • The Kilmore International School
  • The Mac.Robertson Girls’ High School
  • Werribee Secondary College
  • Wesley College Melbourne – Glen Waverley Campus
  • Wesley College Melbourne – St Kilda Road Campus

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » Education Advice » 6 Practical Tips to help your child succeed in High School

6 Practical Tips to help your child succeed in High School


All parents want their child to succeed in high school. High school years can be a stressful time for young people feeling pressure to perform. Student’s just entering high school may be experiencing anxiety.

Parents should focus on learning and growth to help their child succeed in high school.

What does student success look like in High School?

Student success in high school could mean many things to a parent. Your child could be seeking academic excellence, worldly experiences, increased effort or growth.

Student success is not about the number or the result but the development of a love for learning and genuine curiosity. It’s about building 21st century skills such as collaboration and resilience for the post-secondary school real world.

Laura Ruddick, Deputy Principal – Learning & Teaching, Caroline Chisholm Catholic College

caroline chisholm sleep out. succeed in high school.

Image: Caroline Chisholm Catholic College.

6 tips to help your child succeed in High School

Parents can support their child succeed in high school following these tips:

1. Help your child stay organised

Helping your child stay organised for high school is a priority.

This will not only keep them on top of their schoolwork and assist them with their grades, but also alleviates any unnecessary anxiety.

Some ways you can help get your child organised includes:

  • Organise a home space that displays a planner or calendar and keeps your child’s resources in one place
  • Ensure they have what they need for school including stationary, books or textbooks, devices or uniforms
  • Note down all their assessment dates at the beginning of the school Term
  • Help them build a study timetable which sets aside time to complete their weekly homework or assignments
  • Encourage them to make to-do lists and reward them for their achievements

2. Encourage your child to do what they love

Have a discussion with your child about their interests in school and for their future career. Especially when it comes to choosing HSC subjects, parents should let their child exercise their strengths.

A more productive approach to success would be to focus on organisational skills, taking time out to do the things you love and the biggest one, to choose subjects you enjoy regardless of the scaling because this is where you will be most successful.

Laura Ruddick, Deputy Principal – Learning & Teaching, Caroline Chisholm Catholic College

Encouraging your child to take too many challenging subjects can backfire on their grades and mental health.

If your child is interested in extra curricula’s like sports, make sure they take the time to do this. Allowing your child to have a well-rounded high school experience will help them achieve success.

3. Ensure your child’s health and wellbeing

A vital component to succeed in high school is good mental health.

Make sure you are taking care of your child’s wellbeing, particularly during stressful exam periods.

Tips to nurture your child’s wellbeing:

  • Make sure they eat healthy

Prepare healthy meals and snacks using ‘high nutrition brain foods’ including leafy greens, fatty fish, nuts or berries.

  • Make sure they are getting physical exercise

Studies show regular exercise improves mental health and emotional wellbeing. Your child does not have to do strenuous physical activity every day.

The Australian Department of Health recommends children and young people do several hours of light physical activities daily.

This may include walking to school, walking the dog, going to the park with friends, playing handball, or helping around the house.

  • Encourage them to do mindful wellbeing practices

Encourage your child to do ‘mindful’ wellbeing practices from an early age.

This may include meditation, yoga, adult colouring, journaling and more.

  • Make sure they take lots of breaks
  • Make sure they get enough sleep

4. Speak to your child’s teachers or encourage them to

If your child is having social or learning difficulties at school speak to their teacher about their behaviour at school and strategies they can implement in the classroom and at home to improve.

succeed in high school. teacher helping student out.

Photo by CoWomen on Unsplash

Either way, encourage your child to have a relationship with their teacher and seek feedback actively. This way they can ask relevant questions or seek further help if required.

5. Help them build a routine

Having a solid weekly or daily routine is beneficial to many kids. Children with extra-curricular activities to balance with their school and studies may feel overwhelmed without a routine.

Your child’s weekly/daily schedule could include elements of:
• Studying
• Homework
• Sports
• Extra-curricular activities
• Instrument time
• Exercise
• Time with friends

6. Encourage your child to take advantage of the opportunities at school

Taking advantage of student leadership programs is a great way to equip your child with skills for their future.

Other extra-curricular activities at school may include homework club, science club, band or after school sports. When choosing a school for your child, ensure there are programs available to support their interests.

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information about schools please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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