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Home » Education Advice » 5 Private School Trends in Australia

5 Private School Trends in Australia


According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, there has been an increase in growth in Independent private schools over the past 5 years.
As more parents are sending their children to private schools, there have been 5 private school trends in Australia that enhance student learning.

5 Private School Trends in Australia

1. Science and Technology in Private Schools

Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (‘STEM’) skills are becoming crucial for Australia’s changing future.

Technological change is said to advance Australia’s economy. Research shows that STEM jobs in Australia are growing nearly twice as fast as other jobs.

Consequently STEM is a big area of study being emphasised in private schools.

Many private schools introduce opportunities through STEM extracurricular activities or subjects from the very beginning of high school.

In STEM we endeavour to provide a balanced mix of activities that does not only cover the intended curriculum, but also enriches it. For example, we offer coding for Years 7-10 that involves Python programming and CAS calculator TI-Nspire-based programming (which connects to a ‘rover’ that moves). This prepares younger students to understand the ‘tech-active’ component of VCE Mathematics.

   Mr Louis Diamandikos, Head of STEM, Alphington Grammar School.

This is important as the Department of Education, Skills and Employment Australia believes many Australian students don’t understand the importance of STEM ‘until it’s too late’.

Practising STEM from school years allows children to develop workplace skills including critical thinking, collaboration and problem solving.

5 Private School Trends in Australia. children doing chemistry practical in school science lab.

Credit: Alphington Grammar School, Victoria

Many private schools in Australia have advanced STEM facilities available to students.

We are also very fortunate to be using our brand-new STEM labs, which feature state-of-the-art and easy-to-access modern equipment, such as interactive whiteboards and modern electronic safety features. Our enrolment numbers in VCE Sciences have been steady, and we hope that the increased enrolment numbers at junior level will filter into stronger VCE subject enrolments in the coming years.

   Mr Louis Diamandikos, Head of STEM, Alphington Grammar School.

Meriden School in NSW is also characterised by its opportunity for girls to grow in the STEM field.

From robotics and coding to 3-D printing and design, we provide opportunities for real-world problem-solving, exposure to inspiring mentors, access to the latest technology and a cohesive approach to STEM-related skill development.

Ms Ingrid Schwartz, Design and STEM Teacher, Coordinator of Learning Link – STEM, Meriden.

Their facilities include STEM learning centres which include 3D printers, virtual reality, coding and robotics technologies and a CDC machine.

2. Mental Health and Wellbeing in Private Schools

Mental health and student wellbeing is important among Australian young people.

A Headspace report revealed approximately 1 in 3 young people experienced high levels of psychological distress during the peak COVID-19 pandemic.

Private schools are increasingly incorporating education and facilities to provide opportunity for student support.

Ms Deirdre Grealish, Deputy Head of Secondary at Alphington Grammar School explains wellbeing is at the heart of their school.

“Our Exceptionality team (Head of Secondary, Deputy Head of Secondary, Heads of House, Year 7 Coordinator, Head of Learning Support, Psychology Department) meet to discuss specific students who receive additional intervention to support their wellbeing. This work is complemented by weekly Head of House meetings to discuss the wellbeing of the wider student body.

We strive to equip our students with the tools they need to actively maintain and improve their own wellbeing. External programs that the school have selected, such as The Resilience Program, do not just feature during dedicated workshops. Instead, their philosophies trickle through the different strata of school life and it is not uncommon to hear the language of resilience and reflection in our classrooms, hallways, and assemblies. Our Captains and Future Leaders also play an important role in supporting the wellbeing of their peers, acting as mentors for our younger students, facilitating workshops, and performing casual check-ins throughout the year.”

Alphington Grammar School also has its own School Psychologist.

AGS puts the wellbeing of our students and staff at the forefront of all we do.

Mr Maximillian White, School Psychologist

The school’s full-time psychology department offers one-to-one mental health counselling, group wellbeing programs and clinical assessment services.

“AGS also runs a range of school wide initiatives focused on education around wellbeing, resilience, consent, online safety, and positive behaviour.”

The close attention to mental health and wellbeing in private schools is important for children’s school performance.

3. Arts and Creativity in Private Schools

Arts and Creativity is given a new meaning in Australian private schools.

girl doing performing arts in costume. 5 private school trends in australia.

Credit: Alphington Grammar School, Victoria

Private schools offer a range of facilities and technologies to cover every aspect of Arts and Creativity. This may include fine arts, performing arts, design and more.

As technologies progress and improve, the list of methods to create art grow. Being a good drawer is not nearly as important as it once was. New technologies can support the creation of art so it can appeal to more people and expand the pool of potential creatives.

 Mr Michael Gregoriades, Secondary Visual Arts Coordinator, Alphington Grammar School

Research from the Australia Council for the Arts evidenced ‘wide-reaching benefits’ of creativity in education.

Creative learning approaches allow students to build confidence, improve academic education, increase student engagement and enhance social and emotional wellbeing. Including Arts and Creativity in education emphasises a sense of community at school.

Private schools have a greater emphasis on arts in education, which is an indicator of long term student success.

4. Global Connection in Private Schools

Most private schools offer some aspect of global connection for students.

Private school facilities incorporating global connection may include teaching different languages or providing opportunities for student exchange. Many private schools also have ‘sister schools’ overseas, where students connect with other students around the world.

As a school which offers Greek and Chinese language, our Secondary School students look forward to the Global Gateways program they can take part in during Years 9 or 10. Travel to these countries is an exciting and beneficial way for students to immerse themselves in, experience, and bring to life the language and culture taught in the classroom. Our sister school relationships have allowed sharing of projects and reciprocal visits, strengthening language and friendships.

Ms Denise Diakodimitriou, Head of LOTE

Such opportunities allow private school students to broaden their knowledge and perspectives. Connection to the global world allows students to gain a deeper appreciation and understanding of other cultures.

Cultural literacy is a fundamental aspect of many careers, and your child may choose to pursue it in the future.

5. Moving to co-ed

A trend among many single-sex private schools is the transition into coeducation.

Barker’s transition to full coeducation was successfully completed at the start of 2022 and all years from Pre-K-12 are coeducational. It was a project five years in the making and has been enthusiastically embraced by our community and those wishing to join Barker. The world of work, education, employment and leadership has shifted considerably in the 21st century and having boys and girls learning and playing together helps to prepare them for life beyond the school gates.

Melissa Brady, Barker’s Director of Coeducation Transition, Barker College, NSW.

Private schools give parents the option to choose single-sex or coeducational learning.

Private Schools in Australia are adopting trends to equip students with practical skills and experience into higher education and the workforce.

Summary of 5 Private School Trends in Australia

  1. Science and Technology

  2. Mental Health and Wellbeing

  3. Arts and Creativity

  4. Global Connection

  5. Moving to co–ed

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » Education Advice » Your Child’s Digital Footprint: Making sure they think before they click

Your Child’s Digital Footprint: Making sure they think before they click


Your child’s digital footprint is a record of their online activity. This may include, browsing, interacting with others on social media, email or uploading any type of content online.

An ACMA report revealed Australian children aged 9-16 are some of the highest users of internet in the world. Approximately 83% of adolescents access the internet at least 3 times daily.

In today’s online presence, a digital footprint creates a reputation from whenever children decide to step online.

A digital footprint is permanent and difficult to remove from online. It is also important for managing your child’s security and privacy.

Therefore, it is important your child understands how to be careful when engaging in online activity.

Types of digital footprint

There are distinct types of digital footprints:

Passive Digital Footprint

A ‘Passive’ digital footprint is data your child leaves behind unintentionally.

This may include their IP address, approximate location, browser history or information about preferences of products and lifestyle.

Active Digital Footprint

An ‘Active’ digital footprint includes information your child intentionally shares.

This includes social media posts and comments, email or online messaging.

Identifiable

A personally identifiable footprint is one that contains information that can be traced back to your child’s real name.

This includes any information that can be used to trace your child’s name, date and place of birth, educational or employment information.

child's digital footprint. ipad and computer use.

Your child’s data trail can be collected by interested parties whether they intended to leave a digital footprint or not.

Examples of your child’s digital footprint

  • Search/browsing history (This is still visible on ‘Incognito’ mode)
  • Photos and videos uploaded to social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and Reddit (Even deleted content)
  • Any content you publish including status updates, tweets, or comments.
  • Likes and reactions to posts on social media
  • Messages and emails

Can you erase a digital footprint?

Your child’s information and data is very difficult to remove once it is online.

This is because once content is published online or obtained passively, it is difficult to know where information is stored or leaked.

The best way to embrace your child’s digital identity is to ensure they are managing their online presence and minimising their digital footprint.

Minimising your child’s digital footprint

There are a few ways your child can manage their digital footprint.

1. Modifying privacy settings

Your child can modify their privacy settings for a variety of different accounts.

School Choice has a guide to assist parents utilising in-app privacy functions on social media.

2. Be careful sharing harmful or inappropriate content

Have a discussion about their boundaries online and make sure they do not overshare personal information or details.

Ensure your child understands the importance of being kind and respectful even online.

3. Understanding the meaning of being a ‘publisher’ of content

Anyone who posts content, comments, likes or reactions online could be considered a ‘publisher’ of content.

This will help your child manage their online presence as even a ‘like’  or a message may be something to think about before engaging.

A lot of the content children ‘publish’ online can be hard to erase or track in the future.

Understanding that browsing history is not private

Data including websites, use of mobile apps, participation in networks and forums, gaming and entertainment are all available to Internet Service Providers or other interested parties.

This is irrespective of whether your child was using a private or ‘incognito’ browser or deleted their browsing history.

Tip: Google your child’s name

Using google to search your child’s name is a great indication of their current digital footprint.

Give them the opportunity to delete any old or inactive accounts they may come across in the search.

A google search may help track the more visible online content. Your child can remove any inappropriate images, posts or comments.

Despite this, most content remains on the internet even once removed. The best way to ensure a clean digital footprint is to prevent publishing or engaging with inappropriate content.

Why should we care about our child’s digital footprint?

Digital footprints now play a role in people’s employment and educational opportunities.

Employers may check your child’s digital footprint during the recruitment process.

In 2017, 10 American teenagers had their Ivy League School admission rescinded due to online behaviour in a Harvard Facebook group.

Digital citizenship is now considered as important as your child’s offline reputation.

Your child’s digital footprint could also pose serious security risks including fraud if left unchecked.

The concept of ‘digital footprint’ is not intended to scare parents. Creating a digital presence has become a rite of passage.

The most important factor for parents is to make sure their child’s digital footprint is positive.

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Home » Education Advice » A Modern Classroom: Using technology in the classroom

A Modern Classroom: Using technology in the classroom


It is often suggested that using technology in the classroom may cause distraction. However, the instant access to a wide range of information and opportunity for collaboration has made technology a vital element in the classroom.

Approximately 43% of Australian teachers and principals believe that digital technology in the classroom has enhanced their teaching and learning activities rather than detracting.

COVID-19 has boosted the prevalence of technology in learning. Many schools now have programs or technologies in place to assist with students and families affected by COVID-19.

At Xavier College we are trialling new streaming and recording technologies to enable students to connect to our classes while COVID absent and to create high quality multimodal teaching resources as part of our blended learning approach. The SWIVL robots are loanable through our library, the devices are simple to use and produce high quality videos that are shared on our learning platforms.
This is one means to which we are exploring how technologies can advance our instructional practices.

Director of Learning and Growth, Xavier College, Victoria.

Teachers have also continued the use of technology after the pandemic.

Benefits of technology in the classroom

Preparing students with digital life skills

The use of technology in the classroom equips students of all ages with digital skills to carry into the future.

Oneli Ranasinghe, a Primary Education Graduate at UTS says she is taught to incorporate technology into classroom lesson plans.

“There are a lot of things that technology could help with in the future. Students need to learn how to use devices and technology for learning… it is helpful for their future in our society which is digital.”

technology in classroom. ipads in classroom.

Keeping students engaged

Studies are beginning to show positive correlations between technology and student engagement in secondary school.

A 2007 ACER report noted “evidence suggests that the use of ICT (information communications technology) enables richer, more engaging learning environments to be developed”.

However, engagement levels do vary amongst students leading to inconclusive results.

Opportunity for hands-on STEM learning

Many independent schools provide a variety of technology in the classroom for students to experiment and learn with. The schools facilities and technology are used for streams such as robotics, coding or other STEM subjects.

use of technology in the classroom. STEM.

Is the use of technology a cause for concern?

With the rise of smartphones, laptops and tablets digital technologies are omnipresent in our everyday lives. Studies show children spend up to 30% of their time in front of a screen.

There is minimal research to inform educators and parents about the impact of digital technologies on children’s development.

Overuse of digital media may minimise your child’s opportunity for experiences that help with development. This may include socialisation, learning and face-to-face interaction.

A UNSW study revealed that 92% of Australians believe smartphones and social media have reduced outdoor time.

Many schools have programs available to limit the use of technology outside the classroom.

Oneli has completed practical placements in a school that incorporates technology more, and a school that incorporates it less.

“In the newer school where all the students had access to iPad’s they did get distracted more. Because there are more apps on it, they get distracted instead of just focusing on the class. In the traditional school because there is nothing around them except pen and paper, they get the task done quicker.”

Whilst there are benefits and drawbacks of using technology in the classroom, digital technology is the current norm for young people. Parents can assist with the impact of technology on wellbeing and health at home.

How are schools incorporating technology?

  • Some schools have a ‘Bring Your  Own Device (BYOD)’ policy
  • Some schools supply devices for students to access
  • Many schools use ‘Smartboard’ technology
  • Some schools are providing technology to loan to students learning from home
  • Schools allow students to access programs such as Google Classroom, Microsoft Office 365 and more
  • Students have access to technology with a STEM focus

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » Education Advice » How social media can affect your child’s wellbeing

How social media can affect your child’s wellbeing


 

With the rapid growth of social media, being online has become part of a teenager’s daily life. Social media is a ‘double-edged sword’ for parents. It poses benefits, but also exposes youth to risks.

Whether it is posting a dance to TikTok, sharing images to Facebook or posting a ‘story’ to Instagram different platforms are used widely.

Australians aged 14 and over spend an average of almost six hours per week on social media.

What is social media?

Social media is a set of web applications that enable teens to produce and share content.

Webpages with opportunity for social interaction may also be considered a social media site. This may include gaming sites and virtual worlds, or video streaming sites like Youtube or blogs.

social media. wellbeing. how social media can affect my child's wellbeing.

Social media can affect your child’s wellbeing if you are not setting expectations for healthy use. 

Dr Anna Cohen, Clinical Director at Kids and Co believes the key is creating “a really good balance for young people for social media.”

Risks of social media for teens

Most risk occurs where youth are accessing internet under the minimal age without parents’ permission.

A 2012 study reported that 92% of Australians aged 10 to 11 had used social media networking sites. Despite the minimum age requirements, 61% of 8-12 year olds had used YouTube and 32% had used Facebook.

Many social media platforms have in-app features and minimal age requirements to assist parents.

Online bullying and harassment

Social media can affect your child’s wellbeing and lead to negative mental health consequences in children and young people.

“Cyberbullying has become a thing now because it pops into their heads and homes and every facet of the kids life.”

Dr Cohen, Clinical Director, Kids and Co

Online harassment is performed through social media through any individual that communicates hostile or aggressive messages intended to cause discomfort or harm.

Dr Cohen notes some signs that your child may be experiencing cyberbullying:
  • They suddenly stop using their device when they used to enjoy it before;
  • They suddenly stop using their device where they used to use it comfortably e.g. they no longer use their device on the kitchen table where mum would see it;
  • They are exhibiting secretive behaviour e.g. turning their screen as you walk past;
  • They are visibly jumpy and nervous when they receive a text or email;
  • They may allude to bullying without telling you. For example comments like “there’s been a lot of drama lately”; or
  • They may have trouble sleeping or are sleeping more.

Social media replacing in-person interactions

A survey by Common Sense in 2018 revealed most teen’s favourite form of communication is now ‘texting’. Less than one third said they prefer chatting face-to-face.

Many teens and children were utilising social media during the pandemic to connect with others. However, research shows that teens who spend more time on social media feel more isolated.

Dr Cohen believes it is up to parents to set up expectations for healthy media use.

“Remember that young people connect through their online life. Parents have to be really careful with setting up guidelines.”

She suggests parents to review whether they want to limit the hours of use and decide when it is acceptable for children to be on their device at home. For example, your child may not be allowed to use their phone during “homework time” or in a specific area of the home.

“At my house my girls know there is no phone at the dinner table. Family time is happening and in-person communication is happening. Parents have to find an approach that fits them.”

Problematic or harmful content

Social Media can affect your child’s wellbeing if they are exposed to negative and potentially harmful practices.

One in four children between 14 to 17 have “seen or experienced something on the internet in the last year that bothered them”.

Australian Communications and Media Authority

Examples of potentially harmful content can include pro-eating disorder sites, promotion of self-harm, radicalisation, aggressive, violent or sexual imagery.

How using social media can affect your child’s wellbeing

Depression and anxiety

Cyberbullying and exposure to other offensive or harmful online content may cause anxiety, or intensify symptoms of depression for teens.

Social media can also take over the time children spend on healthy activities. Dr Cohen believes issues could arise when children begin experiencing sleep problems, issues with school performance and become less active.

Disrupted sleep

Approximately 60% of psychological distress can be attributed to disrupted sleep.

Checking electronics right before sleep can disrupt a good night’s sleep. Light from digital screens have a stimulating effect on our internal rhythms and melatonin levels that control the sleep cycle.

Your child may also excessively use social media before bed if they believe they are missing social interactions.

You may consider setting boundaries or rules around your child’s use of technology before bed.

When is social media good?

Studies show that social media can have positive effects on youth and adolescents, including:

  • Increasing communication abilities;
  • Obtaining information and knowledge;
  • Accessing advice and support;
  • Increased knowledge of technology;
  • Collaborative learning (e.g. school platforms such as google classroom).
  • Building social relationships and interacting.

These benefits have also improved the social and emotional life of teens during a crucial age in their development.

Should I limit my child’s use of social media?

“I want parents to figure that out themselves.”

Dr Cohen believes it is a very personal decision and there is no generic answer.

However she is not a believer in banning social media.

“They’ll be on the outskirts of their peer group. Social media is how they connect with others. It’s often how they make friendships… and develop relationships”.

Is there anything else I can do?

A key strategy to keep your child safe online is to choose safe settings and set parental controls.

This could block your child from unwanted contact and privacy issues.

Dr Cohen believes it is up to caregiving adults to set good example and really talk with kids and young people about ‘how to be a good human online, and be safe online’.

“Communication is key… but remember this is how they connect.”

Summary:

  • Risks of young people online include cyberbullying, exposure to harmful or problematic content and isolation from in-person interactions.
  • This may lead to intensified depression or anxiety symptoms and disrupted sleep.
  • Parents are responsible for setting up boundaries and expectations around social media use at home.
  • Consider utilising parental controls on social media.
  • Communicate with your child about how to conduct themselves online and be safe.
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Home » Education Advice » A parent’s guide to social media in 2022

A parent’s guide to social media in 2022


Social media use is widespread in Australian teens. The trend is growing with the development of new apps such as ‘TikTok’ being used by approximately 746,000 young Australians.

What is social media?

The NSW Government defines social media as a ‘range of online platforms and applications… that allow people to publish, share and discuss content.’ This may include applications or websites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and TikTok.

Social media in schools

Most schools ban the use of phones and recommend parents limit the use of social media and phones.

Jessica Chilton, Head of Student Wellbeing at Meriden tells us, “Meriden does not allow mobile phones to be used at school, to avoid distraction from student learning. We encourage parents not to allow students access to phones in the evenings, so as not to interfere with their sleep.”

However with 88% of children aged 12 to 13, 97% of children aged 14 to 15 and 92% of children aged 16 to 17 using a social networking service staying offline can be difficult.

Adolescents are inherently social beings. While acknowledging this need to connect, we believe that students are best placed to learn and socially and emotionally develop when they have limited exposure to social media. Meriden encourages our students to become involved in the life of the school through our cocurricular program. Our afterhours homework and study programs allow them space outside timetabled lessons to socially connect with their peers.

Jessica Chilton, Head of Student Wellbeing, Meriden

Australia’s Research Alliance for Children and Youth identifies “healthy children and youth have their physical, development and psychosocial and mental health needs.”

Meriden. Meriden student girls. meriden student girls at school. girls gathered around a table. students on table.

Credit: Meriden School

Internet and social networking activities enable children to access information, advice and support. With 99% of young Australians online daily parents can only enforce online safety.

Many schools are playing an active role in informing parents about cyber safety.

With new apps, websites and engaging platforms arriving regularly, St Leonard’s College takes an extremely pro-active approach to ensuring students and families are safely navigating the online space. We provide regular and timely advice on the routine ways parents can both help and monitor their child’s use of technology and social media, as well as comprehensive seminars and expert guidance surrounding these issues.

Tim Barlow, Director of Technology Innovation, St Leonard’s College

Helping your teen use social media safely

Facebook

Facebook suggests reviewing privacy shortcuts and account settings with your child to make selections you are both comfortable with.

Privacy settings allow you to choose your audience when you post. Account settings allow you to manage ‘profile and tagging’.This enables you to set who can see posts and tagged content on your child’s timeline.

Age Minimum: 13

TikTok

TikTok has family pairing features which allow you to link your TikTok account to your teens.

This enables a variety of content and privacy settings including ‘Screen Time Management’ and ‘Restricted Mode’.

Source: TikTok, https://www.tiktok.com/safety/en/guardians-guide/

Age Minimum: 13

Instagram

Instagram has a variety of privacy features for teenager’s to utilise.

Using a private account ensures your child’s content is only seen by their followers. Instagram allows you to remove a follower, block accounts or delete posts. Comment control settings allow you to choose who comments on your posts.

Find other ways to limit unwanted interactions on Instagram here.

Age Minimum: 13

Snapchat

Snapchat’s privacy settings allow you to choose who can send your teen snaps, view their stories or location on the ‘Snap Map’.

Information about accessing various privacy setting options on Snapchat are found here.

Age Minimum: 13

Tips for parents:

Alongside navigating privacy and safety settings on online platforms parents are encouraged to have conversation with their teenagers about how the engage online.

The Australian Government identifies 3 main risks to consider:

1. Contact Risks

Your child could talk or play online with a stranger or allow apps to access their data. Discuss the ramifications of revealing personal information online including their name, age or locations.

2. Conduct Risks

Unkind or disrespectful conduct towards your child may escalate to online harassment, threatening or cyberbullying. Using the above settings can assist with this. Have discussions with your child to ensure they are not perpetuating these behaviours.

3. Content Risks

Your child may watch shows, view content or play games unsuitable for their age. Make sure you engage age appropriate settings on social media and the internet where required.

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » School News » Inaburra Pivoting to Online

Inaburra Pivoting to Online


Since Inaburra’s inception, the study of media has continued to be one of the key pillars of the school. A fully equipped and operational Media Centre located in the Performing Arts Centre, including a live television and recording studio, enables students to acquire skills in sound recording, video production and camera work using high-quality industry-standard equipment. Many students who have completed the IT Multimedia Technologies course for their HSC have gone on to pursue successful careers in the media industry.

Meet the Media Makers

Current students are given first-hand insight by visiting professionals at the ‘Meet the Media Makers’ event. This year (pre-COVID) it included a visit from Jamie Cohen, founder and anaging director of Clockwork Films, Sam Beckman, who has his own YouTube channel, and Will Liston, senior editor for Neil Crompton Motorsports. All these professionals are Inaburra alumni and each spoke of their journey into the industry, rapidly changing technology, and advice for students on how to find their niche in this highly competitive market.

Meet-the-Media

Pivoting school events to online platforms

Inaburra’s Media Centre has also come into its own with the restrictions brought about by coronavirus, with nearly all the School’s onsite public events either cancelled or limited in numbers. Over the past few months, thanks to the ingenuity of the Stage and Screen Faculty and the benefit of wonderful facilities, we have seen many its school activities ‘pivot’ to online. Media staff, technical support staff and students have all risen to the challenge of creating events across a range of digital platforms.

8158

From websites to Livestreams to videos

Instead of attending a subject selection information night in person, Senior students and their parents have been able to watch subject video outlines through a custom-built mini website. The TV Studio has been fully booked as teachers from all faculties record video overviews of their specialist areas.

Inaburra is now hosting its ‘Meet the Principal’ events through the Livestream platform, with registered participants able to ask questions of key staff in real time. Inaburra has also implemented the Livestream platform for online school assemblies that are projected into every classroom for students to watch in their Homegroups. There has also been the opportunity to record promotional video campaigns for charity fundraisers such as the recent Red Shield Appeal for the Salvation Army. Inaburra is currently in the process of recording a multimedia music performance in lieu of a live concert for its music ensembles from K-12.

Inaburra certainly looks forward to the time when it can welcome visitors back to the school in person. In the meantime, the school is blessed to have provision for providing alternate means of communicating with its community and student cohort through the digital space, and thinks that, post Coronavirus, there are some events that will remain on this platform rather than reverting to their previous ‘live’ format.

1891 1902

Publish By
Religion Christian
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 1200 students
Fees 8k - 12k 12k - 16k
Annual tuition fees range from $10,970 (Kindergarten) up to $18,474 (Year 12)
Phone
(02) 95******* (02) 9543 2533
Address 75 Billa Road Bangor NSW 2234
Email
school@*******
school@inaburra.nsw.edu.au
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Home » School News » Four wins, three continents

Four wins, three continents


With four regional wins on three continents, the Barker Redbacks is attracting a lot of attention globally, as the team currently sits in the top 10 of robotics teams in the world.

In April, the Redbacks took out their latest Regional Title at the New York City FIRST Robotics competition. The team was also awarded the Chairman’s Award for its worldwide contribution to robotics.

Earlier in the year, the Redbacks was the only Australian team to compete at the inaugural Shenzhen Regional FRC Competition in China, where the team of nine students did a sensational job building a strategy to win the tournament.

In addition to that Regional title, the team also came away with the Innovation in Control Award.

The Redbacks again took out the Regional title against 28 other teams from Australia, Taiwan and China, as well as winning the Excellence in Engineering Award. At the South Pacific Regional the following week, the team took out its third title from a pool of 43 teams, and was awarded its second Excellence in Engineering Award.

“We are currently the only team in the world to have won four regional competitions,” says Barker College Robotics co-ordinator, Lael Grant. “Our students have put in endless hours designing, building and coding their robot for this year’s competitions and we are incredibly proud of their achievements.”

At the world championships in Houston, Texas in late April where they competed against teams from NASA and other world-class universities, the Redbacks made it all the way through to the Hopper Division Finals and achieved a final ranking of 10th.

With six Blue Banners in a single season, it places the team in equal second place for the World Record.

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Home » School News » The importance of strong values

The importance of strong values


 

Words: Ms Linda Douglas, principal

You may have listened to Simon Sinek’s talk Millennials in the Workplace as it did the rounds on social media. It has some important messages for all of us and is well worth a listen. Understanding the addiction to social media and the effect it is having on people, particularly our youngest, is essential.

Simon discusses the addiction, the instant gratification, the lack of engagement in the present and the way it can hamper development of deep and meaningful relationships, the building of social skills and confidence. And the use of the word addiction is deliberate and necessary. Swiping right instead of engaging in the highs, lows and intricacies of falling in love is a good example given by Simon that social media usage needs to be well managed and balanced. As is the fact that we are increasingly addicted to checking our phones and devices before and during meetings, boosting our own importance yet missing vital opportunities to deeply engage, be mindful and strengthen our relationships.

The instant gratification of social media is undermining our ability to stick to something, to show grit and persistence. Simon talks about people giving up jobs as they don’t feel they are making an impact after only eight months; that we want to get to the summit without climbing the mountain; that we are losing sight of what it really means to have an impact.

Most importantly, he talks about the environment: that we need to develop environments where we can help the next generation build confidence and the skills of co-operation and collaboration; places where they can overcome the challenges of the digital world and find balance; to gain an understanding of the fulfilment you get when working for something over a long period of time; and the fact that we can only improve our world with a truly sustained effort.

In his book Together is Better, Simon notes that a team is not a group of people working together, it is a group of people who trust each other. We need to remember that when we encourage our girls to work collaboratively. How do we ensure they develop trust in each other first?

He reminds us that working hard for something we don’t care about is called stress, while working hard for something we care about is called passion. How do we ensure that learning is relevant, challenging, meaningful and engaging for our girls so we ignite their passion?

If we fight against something we focus on our hate, but if we fight for something we care about we focus on the things we love. This is what we need to engage our girls in if they are to make a difference in their world.

As a school community we have the ability to grow a strong future: the next generation. And in our work we can never underestimate the importance of strong values. They form the culture and very essence of Ruyton, a platform on which we build the future while we respect the past. They shape and define the Ruyton woman and the way she leads her life.

  • Character – to be resilient and to act with confidence and compassion
  • Citizenship – to affect positive change through civic and environmental action
  • Endeavour – to be curious, creative and courageous learners seeking to achieve personal best
  • Integrity – to live a life with honesty and virtue.

The Ruyton community lives by these values, providing support, role models and a sounding board for our girls as they make their mark in the world.

Want to know more about Ruyton? Have a look at their School Choice page by clicking here: Ruyton Girls School

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » » Storypark

Storypark


 

Storypark is an online community portal for updating parents on student learning. Creating partnerships with families in order to communicate their children’s learning is an important aspect within our centre.

Teachers in our Early Learning, together with the Digital Learning Mentor of Early Learning and the Junior School, undertook research to engage more effectively with families and to collaborate with them about their children’s learning. The online portal, Storypark, was chosen to be trialled.

We have been pleased with how our community has engaged with this initiative and parents are also sharing, through comments and photos, the learning the children achieve outside of Ruyton’s Early Learning. As the trial has progressed parents have increasingly commented on their child’s activities, both within and outside the Early Learning environment. There is still the opportunity to document and highlight the essence of the program in traditional ways, but Storypark offers an instant link to parents and grandparents alike, which they can access. This is another example of digital devices and technology being integrated seamlessly into our programs to enhance a student’s learning experience and parents’ insights into this. Storypark has been so successful as a tool for collaboration and communication, we are exploring ways in which it can be extended to the other Early Learning groups at Ruyton.

Here is an example of how Storypark works:

The Henny Penny Hatching Program has arrived

At lunchtime today the girls were very excited to see the chickens and eggs arrive. “Oh they are soo cute,” said Alexandra. The three chicks were placed in the brooding box in the curious garden with some food, water and a light for heat. The 12 eggs were placed in an incubator and we now watch and wait to see them hatch over the coming days.

Comments:

Steven (parent)

‘Welcome to the world, little chicks! They are so cute!

Are they keeping warm?

What are they eating?’

Mrs W (Girls’ Pre Prep teacher)

“Thanks for these great questions, Steven. I asked the girls for their answers.”

They are in a hot cage,” said Chloe F.

They are eating seeds,” said Natalie.

They are in an incubator,” said Georgia.

“Just like they were under their mummy hen’s bottom,” said Eloise.

“They are very cute now, though they were wet when they came out,” said Emerson.

Ms Teresa Wojcik, acting director of Early Learning

Publish By
Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
School Search


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