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Home » Education Advice » The benefits of games in education

The benefits of games in education


Games in education have been around for years. With the growth of technology, the use of games in education has increased significantly over recent years.

What sorts of games are used in education?

The types of games used in the classroom depend on the children’s year level, knowledge and subject choice.

Commonly used games in education include:

  • Hangman

  • Scatter-gories

  • Bingo (can be used in almost any subject)

  • Puzzles

  • Drawing games including colouring games or connect the dots

  • Quizzes

With the rise of technology teachers are reported to be using more digital games in education.

Research from New York University and the University of Michigan revealed nearly 60% of teachers are using digital games in education weekly.

Approximately 18% of teachers are using digital games in education daily.

Digital games in education include:

  • Mathletics

  • Kahoot

  • Vocabulary pictionary

Benefits of games in education

Increased student engagement and participation

Games allow schools to break lessons up into more manageable segments. This prevents children from becoming bored or disengaged.

Brain games are designed to enhance students’ ability to strengthen their attention. Games can also help students with ADHD with their focus and attention. Virtual games can also help students with dyslexia improve ‘spatial and temporal’ attention.

games in education. online game.

Games that require memory recall such as quizzes can become a ‘classroom motivator’ for students.

Research shows that games in education also increase student active participation. Students were more engaged during periods of game play rather than during traditional classroom instruction.

Students in subjects structured with more game-based learning have a higher participation and persistence in meeting course requirements.

Increased cognitive skills

School-age children develop cognitive skills including memory, thinking, learning and problem-solving through play.

The interactive aspect of games including proposed tasks and actions allow students to develop their critical thinking skills.

What should parents be doing at home?

It is a great idea to play with your child at home too. Playing games with your child at home can help them reinforce school learning.

Playing at home can also provide the opportunity to practice skills learnt at school. For example, if you are playing Pictionary, you can ask your child to keep a tally and count how many points each player has.

Playing games at home will also help manage your child’s screen time.

Exploring STEM using games in education

Australia requires students to enter the STEM workforce in the future. Students who drop or switch out of Science, Technology, Engineering or Maths experience difficulties with the introductory courses.

Introducing games could help students wrap their head around and practice vital STEM skills.

By including games in STEM education, students can grasp vital skills and find motivation to stay in the course.

New York University research from 2013 found that maths games can enhance middle-schoolers’ (students in year 6 to 8) motivation to learn.

Students who frequently engage in games score an average higher mark than in maths and science tests.

Experiential learning

Games in the classroom forces students to think from different perspectives and experiences.

Students receive skills and knowledge that are not present in a traditional classroom by placing themselves in a variety of positions.

For example, the game ‘Multiverse’ on Mathletics allows students to learn multiplication as ‘space traders’ in a rich, animated story world.

Learning from failure using games in education

Game-based learning allows students to embrace failure as a learning opportunity.

Your child may feel discouraged from failing an assignment, test or class.

Involving games in education will give students multiple opportunities for effort and revision in classroom learning. Allowing students to experience failure multiple times allows students to develop a growth mindset.

games in education. classroom.

Using games in education has also enhanced student motivation to take risks. Risk-based learning games help your child gain long-term retention of information.

Tracking your child’s learning in the classroom

More than a third of teachers use games weekly to assess student progress and understanding of class material.

Do games in education improve my child’s grades?

Whilst research is still being conducted, many studies do show improved grades when teachers used education based games.

A study on Kahoot, a multiple-choice quiz game, revealed improved student attitudes towards learning and higher academic scores.

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Home » Education Advice » 5 Private School Trends in Australia

5 Private School Trends in Australia


According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, there has been an increase in growth in Independent private schools over the past 5 years.
As more parents are sending their children to private schools, there have been 5 private school trends in Australia that enhance student learning.

5 Private School Trends in Australia

1. Science and Technology in Private Schools

Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (‘STEM’) skills are becoming crucial for Australia’s changing future.

Technological change is said to advance Australia’s economy. Research shows that STEM jobs in Australia are growing nearly twice as fast as other jobs.

Consequently STEM is a big area of study being emphasised in private schools.

Many private schools introduce opportunities through STEM extracurricular activities or subjects from the very beginning of high school.

In STEM we endeavour to provide a balanced mix of activities that does not only cover the intended curriculum, but also enriches it. For example, we offer coding for Years 7-10 that involves Python programming and CAS calculator TI-Nspire-based programming (which connects to a ‘rover’ that moves). This prepares younger students to understand the ‘tech-active’ component of VCE Mathematics.

   Mr Louis Diamandikos, Head of STEM, Alphington Grammar School.

This is important as the Department of Education, Skills and Employment Australia believes many Australian students don’t understand the importance of STEM ‘until it’s too late’.

Practising STEM from school years allows children to develop workplace skills including critical thinking, collaboration and problem solving.

5 Private School Trends in Australia. children doing chemistry practical in school science lab.

Credit: Alphington Grammar School, Victoria

Many private schools in Australia have advanced STEM facilities available to students.

We are also very fortunate to be using our brand-new STEM labs, which feature state-of-the-art and easy-to-access modern equipment, such as interactive whiteboards and modern electronic safety features. Our enrolment numbers in VCE Sciences have been steady, and we hope that the increased enrolment numbers at junior level will filter into stronger VCE subject enrolments in the coming years.

   Mr Louis Diamandikos, Head of STEM, Alphington Grammar School.

Meriden School in NSW is also characterised by its opportunity for girls to grow in the STEM field.

From robotics and coding to 3-D printing and design, we provide opportunities for real-world problem-solving, exposure to inspiring mentors, access to the latest technology and a cohesive approach to STEM-related skill development.

Ms Ingrid Schwartz, Design and STEM Teacher, Coordinator of Learning Link – STEM, Meriden.

Their facilities include STEM learning centres which include 3D printers, virtual reality, coding and robotics technologies and a CDC machine.

2. Mental Health and Wellbeing in Private Schools

Mental health and student wellbeing is important among Australian young people.

A Headspace report revealed approximately 1 in 3 young people experienced high levels of psychological distress during the peak COVID-19 pandemic.

Private schools are increasingly incorporating education and facilities to provide opportunity for student support.

Ms Deirdre Grealish, Deputy Head of Secondary at Alphington Grammar School explains wellbeing is at the heart of their school.

“Our Exceptionality team (Head of Secondary, Deputy Head of Secondary, Heads of House, Year 7 Coordinator, Head of Learning Support, Psychology Department) meet to discuss specific students who receive additional intervention to support their wellbeing. This work is complemented by weekly Head of House meetings to discuss the wellbeing of the wider student body.

We strive to equip our students with the tools they need to actively maintain and improve their own wellbeing. External programs that the school have selected, such as The Resilience Program, do not just feature during dedicated workshops. Instead, their philosophies trickle through the different strata of school life and it is not uncommon to hear the language of resilience and reflection in our classrooms, hallways, and assemblies. Our Captains and Future Leaders also play an important role in supporting the wellbeing of their peers, acting as mentors for our younger students, facilitating workshops, and performing casual check-ins throughout the year.”

Alphington Grammar School also has its own School Psychologist.

AGS puts the wellbeing of our students and staff at the forefront of all we do.

Mr Maximillian White, School Psychologist

The school’s full-time psychology department offers one-to-one mental health counselling, group wellbeing programs and clinical assessment services.

“AGS also runs a range of school wide initiatives focused on education around wellbeing, resilience, consent, online safety, and positive behaviour.”

The close attention to mental health and wellbeing in private schools is important for children’s school performance.

3. Arts and Creativity in Private Schools

Arts and Creativity is given a new meaning in Australian private schools.

girl doing performing arts in costume. 5 private school trends in australia.

Credit: Alphington Grammar School, Victoria

Private schools offer a range of facilities and technologies to cover every aspect of Arts and Creativity. This may include fine arts, performing arts, design and more.

As technologies progress and improve, the list of methods to create art grow. Being a good drawer is not nearly as important as it once was. New technologies can support the creation of art so it can appeal to more people and expand the pool of potential creatives.

 Mr Michael Gregoriades, Secondary Visual Arts Coordinator, Alphington Grammar School

Research from the Australia Council for the Arts evidenced ‘wide-reaching benefits’ of creativity in education.

Creative learning approaches allow students to build confidence, improve academic education, increase student engagement and enhance social and emotional wellbeing. Including Arts and Creativity in education emphasises a sense of community at school.

Private schools have a greater emphasis on arts in education, which is an indicator of long term student success.

4. Global Connection in Private Schools

Most private schools offer some aspect of global connection for students.

Private school facilities incorporating global connection may include teaching different languages or providing opportunities for student exchange. Many private schools also have ‘sister schools’ overseas, where students connect with other students around the world.

As a school which offers Greek and Chinese language, our Secondary School students look forward to the Global Gateways program they can take part in during Years 9 or 10. Travel to these countries is an exciting and beneficial way for students to immerse themselves in, experience, and bring to life the language and culture taught in the classroom. Our sister school relationships have allowed sharing of projects and reciprocal visits, strengthening language and friendships.

Ms Denise Diakodimitriou, Head of LOTE

Such opportunities allow private school students to broaden their knowledge and perspectives. Connection to the global world allows students to gain a deeper appreciation and understanding of other cultures.

International education is paramount at Xavier because it is simply part of our fabric as a College and a community. One of our focus is to reach for a greater understanding of others, for deep connections and continued discoveries of varied cultural backgrounds so our students can be men for others. They can develop the best version of themselves by reflecting on their own identity in a larger context. Travelling, abroad or interstate, also opens our young men’s mind and allows them to put in practice and experience first hand what they are exploring in the classroom. 

International Education Coordinator, Marie-Pierre Deleplanque, Xavier College

Cultural literacy is a fundamental aspect of many careers, and your child may choose to pursue it in the future.

5. Moving to co-ed

A trend among many single-sex private schools is the transition into coeducation.

Barker’s transition to full coeducation was successfully completed at the start of 2022 and all years from Pre-K-12 are coeducational. It was a project five years in the making and has been enthusiastically embraced by our community and those wishing to join Barker. The world of work, education, employment and leadership has shifted considerably in the 21st century and having boys and girls learning and playing together helps to prepare them for life beyond the school gates.

Melissa Brady, Barker’s Director of Coeducation Transition, Barker College, NSW.

Private schools give parents the option to choose single-sex or coeducational learning.

Private Schools in Australia are adopting trends to equip students with practical skills and experience into higher education and the workforce.

Summary of 5 Private School Trends in Australia

  1. Science and Technology

  2. Mental Health and Wellbeing

  3. Arts and Creativity

  4. Global Connection

  5. Moving to co–ed

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » Education Advice » A Modern Classroom: Using technology in the classroom

A Modern Classroom: Using technology in the classroom


It is often suggested that using technology in the classroom may cause distraction. However, the instant access to a wide range of information and opportunity for collaboration has made technology a vital element in the classroom.

Approximately 43% of Australian teachers and principals believe that digital technology in the classroom has enhanced their teaching and learning activities rather than detracting.

COVID-19 has boosted the prevalence of technology in learning. Many schools now have programs or technologies in place to assist with students and families affected by COVID-19.

At Xavier College we are trialling new streaming and recording technologies to enable students to connect to our classes while COVID absent and to create high quality multimodal teaching resources as part of our blended learning approach. The SWIVL robots are loanable through our library, the devices are simple to use and produce high quality videos that are shared on our learning platforms.
This is one means to which we are exploring how technologies can advance our instructional practices.

Director of Learning and Growth, Xavier College, Victoria.

Teachers have also continued the use of technology after the pandemic.

Benefits of technology in the classroom

Preparing students with digital life skills

The use of technology in the classroom equips students of all ages with digital skills to carry into the future.

Oneli Ranasinghe, a Primary Education Graduate at UTS says she is taught to incorporate technology into classroom lesson plans.

“There are a lot of things that technology could help with in the future. Students need to learn how to use devices and technology for learning… it is helpful for their future in our society which is digital.”

technology in classroom. ipads in classroom.

Keeping students engaged

Studies are beginning to show positive correlations between technology and student engagement in secondary school.

A 2007 ACER report noted “evidence suggests that the use of ICT (information communications technology) enables richer, more engaging learning environments to be developed”.

However, engagement levels do vary amongst students leading to inconclusive results.

Opportunity for hands-on STEM learning

Many independent schools provide a variety of technology in the classroom for students to experiment and learn with. The schools facilities and technology are used for streams such as robotics, coding or other STEM subjects.

use of technology in the classroom. STEM.

Is the use of technology a cause for concern?

With the rise of smartphones, laptops and tablets digital technologies are omnipresent in our everyday lives. Studies show children spend up to 30% of their time in front of a screen.

There is minimal research to inform educators and parents about the impact of digital technologies on children’s development.

Overuse of digital media may minimise your child’s opportunity for experiences that help with development. This may include socialisation, learning and face-to-face interaction.

A UNSW study revealed that 92% of Australians believe smartphones and social media have reduced outdoor time.

Many schools have programs available to limit the use of technology outside the classroom.

Oneli has completed practical placements in a school that incorporates technology more, and a school that incorporates it less.

“In the newer school where all the students had access to iPad’s they did get distracted more. Because there are more apps on it, they get distracted instead of just focusing on the class. In the traditional school because there is nothing around them except pen and paper, they get the task done quicker.”

Whilst there are benefits and drawbacks of using technology in the classroom, digital technology is the current norm for young people. Parents can assist with the impact of technology on wellbeing and health at home.

How are schools incorporating technology?

  • Some schools have a ‘Bring Your  Own Device (BYOD)’ policy
  • Some schools supply devices for students to access
  • Many schools use ‘Smartboard’ technology
  • Some schools are providing technology to loan to students learning from home
  • Schools allow students to access programs such as Google Classroom, Microsoft Office 365 and more
  • Students have access to technology with a STEM focus

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » Education Advice » Coeducational vs single-sex schooling: a guide for parents to decide which option is best for their child

Coeducational vs single-sex schooling: a guide for parents to decide which option is best for their child


Credit: Macquarie Grammar

With conflicting advice on whether coeducational or single-sex schools are better, parents investing in independent education must decide what is best suited to their child.

The Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) found children at coeducational schools are learning at a similar or faster rate than students at single-sex schools.

Academic Performance in coeducational vs single-sex schooling

Data does not evidence whether single-sex or coeducational schools perform better academically.

NAPLAN results in 2017 revealed that single-sex schools performed at a higher rate in literacy and numeracy.

However, a recent analysis of NAPLAN data depicted a similar performance amongst single-sex and coeducational students.

Does gender play a role in academic performance?

General wellbeing and socialisation may affect the education of children.

Evidence suggests that girls in single-sex schools may have an advantage. Girls are displaying more confidence in STEM studies in a single-sex environment.

Meriden girls are free to pursue a love of learning and academic excellence in any area they choose including science, technology, engineering, maths and sport without fear of traditional stereotyping. Cocurricular interaction with our brother school, Trinity Grammar, ensures that the girls are given the opportunity to develop a full range of social skills while still enjoying the girl-purposed facilities, teaching and opportunities of this single sex school.

Dr Julie Greenhalgh, Principal of Meriden, Anglican school for girls located in Strathfield.

The study reports that boy’s strong affinity towards STEM-related studies may influence girls’ interest.

Single-sex schools were recommended by 54% of female respondents to promote girls STEM interests. Girls in single-sex mathematics classes also displayed more confidence in their maths ability.

However, this may not indicate a better academic performance.

Post-school qualifications were similar for women who attended coeducational schooling.

The choice between single-sex and coeducational schooling may depend on your child’s confidence performing with peers of the opposite sex.

Teachers will amplify individual potential

Ultimately, a parent’s choice will depend on more than whether the school is single-sex or coeducational.

Barker’s director of Coeducation Transition Melissa Brady believes it is the “visionary leadership and presence of a supportive community of teachers” that optimise a child’s individual potential.

A shift towards coeducation schooling

Only 4% of independent schools on Sydney’s North Shore are coeducational.

coeducational vs single-sex schooling. Boys and girls at school.

Credit: Yarra Valley Grammar

With Australia’s independent single-sex schools declining, research predicts a complete disappearance by 2035.

Some of Sydney’s oldest private schools are transitioning from single-sex education to full coeducation.

Barker College Head, Phillip Heath told The Daily Telegraph, “Life is co-ed. We want to prepare young people for much more than an ATAR or even for life at university.”

Marist College North Shore has also begun accepting female students. They believe the collaboration reflects awareness, motivation, mediation, respect and engagement.

2022 marks 50 years of coeducation at St Leonard’s College. During this time, we have seen our students flourish alongside one another in an environment that is a true reflection of life beyond the school gates.

Pat Kenny, Acting Principal, St Leonard’s College.

Tips for parents making the choice:

  • Identify areas that are important to your child. Discuss with schools what they are doing in these areas. Are your children interested in academic performance, sports or performing arts?
  • Discuss with your child or a professional how they socially perform. Would your child feel more confident in a single-sex vs coeducational setting?
  • Research the schools culture, character and offerings. Decide which school most aligns with your child’s values and the areas they wish to excel in.

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » School News » Little Scientists Big Science

Little Scientists Big Science


John Monash Science School offered its inaugural ‘Little Scientists Big Science’ initiative for the first time in term three 2011.

The program was the brainchild of one Year 10 student, 2013 School Captain, Lachlan Harkness. Lachlan thought it would be a good idea to engage young students in Science and give them an opportunity he did not get in his own Primary education. He was also keen to give the JMSS students an opportunity to develop and broaden their scientific communication skills, and so the project was born.

Second

More than 300 Primary School students have participated in the program over the past eight years, concluding with each student presenting their final project in one of JMSS’s Science Presentation evenings. Feedback from schools, teachers, principals, parents and students has been overwhelmingly positive.

Since the success of this program the John Monash Science School has also run a ‘Mini Mathematicians’ program since 2016, and in 2020 is introducing ‘RoboGals’, alongside these great programs, which aims to increase participation of girls in STEM.

For more information please contact Ben Delves:

Email – ben.delves@jmss.vic.edu.au

Phone – +61 3 9905 1002

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Religion None
Type Government
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Year 10 - Year 12
Enrolment 650 students
Fees
Email
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Home » Education Advice » Creation and innovation at Scotch College

Creation and innovation at Scotch College


The latest project taking shape at Scotch College is the Design and Technology Cube. This will be a centre of innovation, where boys will discover new possibilities in the rapidly progressing fields of Design and Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. Learning will occur through collaboration and experimentation in both traditional skills and emerging processes. In state-of-the-art workshops and design studios, boys will develop skills in design, testing and refinement that are essential to every field of enterprise.

The Design and Technology Cube is a contemporary response to both the ever-evolving discipline of design and the school’s commitment to creativity and progress built on sound academic principles.

Supporting the iterative nature of problem solving and development, the centre is premised on a seamless flow between studios incorporating computer-aided design facilities and spaces for creation – be the product electrical, mechanical, a piece of software, a traditional work of craftsmanship or, indeed, a system comprising some or all of these elements.

Scotch’s latest completed project is the Sir Zelman Cowen Centre for Science. Officially opened in late 2016, the centre provides the boys with the opportunity to engage with scientific areas of study which remain unresolved.

Scotch is home to 160 boarders, from Year 7 to 12. Boys reside in one of three boarding houses and it is in this environment they learn to share their lives with others from a wide range of backgrounds. Boarding at Scotch provides boys access to the school’s outstanding facilities and in any one day a boy might go from rowing training on the Yarra River at the western perimeter of the school, or playing tennis on one of the college’s 26 courts, to playing music in the James Forbes Academy. As Tim Byrnes, Dean of Boarding, noted “by boarding at Scotch, boys from rural and regional families can access world-class facilities such as these, ensuring the education they receive is on par with their city counterparts. It provides opportunities that are seldom found elsewhere”.

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Religion Christian
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls
Enrolment 1700 day students, including 160 boarders
Fees Tuition from $7750 (Prep) to $9691 (Year 12) per instalment (three times a year), boarding $24,657 per annum
Phone
03 9810******* 03 9810 4203
Fax
03 9810******* 03 9810 4333
Address 1 Morrison Street, Hawthorn 3122
Email
admissi*******
admissions@scotch.vic.edu.au
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Home » Education Advice » STEM in the early years

STEM in the early years


In 2016, a group of educators from Catholic Education Western Australia explored Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) education with young children. Sarah Denholm, the recently appointed director of Ruyton Early Learning at Ruyton Girls’ School, documented and shared their journey through the publication of the iBook STEM in the Early Years: A Journey.

Young children are capable and competent learners who have their own theories and thinking about the world around them. Educators should acknowledge children’s prior knowledge and foster their natural curiosity for STEM. Early experience with STEM helps build skills for problem solving, research, investigation, creativity, design and construction.

What research tells us about children’s brains and their capacity to learn
Children learn by building on their prior knowledge and experiences. Through home and school experiences, children gather information about the world around them — how things work and why. Opportunities for children to engage in scientific thinking processes through play-based learning allow them to engage in deep thinking. When children engage in deep learning they develop skills and competencies needed for life-long learning and thrive in today’s world.

STEM in everyday life and classroom
There are many opportunities for STEM in everyday life. The trick is to recognise these moments of learning and discovery. Walking down the street brings opportunities to notice, wonder and explore. A carefully planned classroom environment provides an invitation for exploration and wonder about the world around us. When educators design learning environments that invite children to problem solve, enquire, research and experiment it helps the development of skills and understanding for lifelong learning. The interdisciplinary nature of STEM learning and teaching supports educators to do this effectively.

Activities you can do with children
There are many examples of water-related STEM provocations and experiences you can create for the children throughout the iBook. You can use everyday items from the classroom and home to set up provocations. Loose parts and open-ended materials create opportunities for investigation and creation. The iBook includes a teacher’s toolkit with specific resources and ideas. Having a focus on water, our teachers found that a wet area with access to liquids and resources was a great place to start. A place where children had permission to pour, tip, squeeze, drip, float and sink at their leisure led to increased engagement and curiosity about water. Items such as buckets, spoons, straws, paintbrushes, ice and connecting pipes were made available for children to use in their experience and play. There are many opportunities for STEM in everyday life. The trick is to recognise these moments of learning and discovery.

What children learn
To meet the outcomes of the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF), there must be provision and planning for children to develop the capabilities for learning in our changing world. Educators should focus on developing children’s curiosity, creativity, critical thinking and cooperative skills.

Why I published the iBook
I was fortunate to work with the early childhood educators from Catholic Education WA as they began a journey into STEM education. We wanted to explore what STEM could look like with children in pre-compulsory schooling. The iBook shares stories of educators working in various contexts, who had different levels of teaching experiences. Together, our aim was to increase STEM learning and teaching experiences and improved education outcomes for children. The iBook celebrates the journey of the educators to improve pedagogy practice and explore STEM in the early years. The iBook also showcases the capabilities and strengths of young children.

STEM in the Early Years: A Journey is available to download for free from the iTunes store: itunes.apple.com/au/book/stem-inthe-early-years/id1187113064?mt=11

Sarah Denholm is a passionate early childhood educator from Perth, Western Australia. She holds a Bachelor of Education in Early Childhood from Curtin University and a Professional Certificate of Instructional Leadership from The University of Melbourne. Her personal educational philosophy is play based and inquiry led, and takes inspiration from the work and research from Reggio Emilia and nature pedagogy practices. Sarah is passionate about learning environments, pedagogical documentation, and working with families and communities to make learning visible. At the time of the iBook’s publication, Sarah was working as an early childhood consultant for Catholic Education in WA.

Reproduced courtesy of Early Horizons 6.1 with the permission of ASG.

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » Education Advice » STEM at De La Salle College

STEM at De La Salle College


“De La Salle students graduate with wide-ranging STEM skills, enabling them to contribute to Australia’s future economic development,” says principal, Peter Houlihan. Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) skills will drive the potential of our future economies. De La Salle College is developing tomorrow’s STEM leaders by offering a range of opportunities to promote learning, engagement and innovation in this field.

STEM is deeply embedded in all levels of the curriculum, from junior Science and Mathematics studies to senior Systems Engineering courses. The philosophy at the foundation of teachings in this field is to enable students to recognise the relevance of this learning in their lives. This encourages students to think critically, reason, generalise, make connections and learn from their mistakes. Students develop competencies such as persistence, self-regulation, critical thinking and problem-solving skills; skills which will prepare them for the 21st century workforce.

The STEM approach provides a platform for interdisciplinary collaboration across subjects in response to issues such as climate change, population growth and increased reliance on technology and robotics.

Facilities include industry-standard machines and processes, such as laser cutting, 3D printing, 2D and 3D Computer-Aided Design, micro-controller coding, mechatronics and introductory Artificial Intelligence. The college is also moving to further expand its STEM facilities with the purchase of a 3D CNC (Computer Numerical Control) routing machine.

Putting these facilities to use, Year 10 Systems Technology students recently built Infrared Remote-Controlled vehicles. Students then tested their vehicles in a race, controlling them from the sidelines using controls they had borrowed from home. The vehicles use an Arduino microcontroller which is programmed by the students to follow commands sent using the remotes. The infrared sensor on the vehicles provide a way for the cars to receive signals from the remote control.

The project combines a number of real-world devices to demonstrate how various components can be used in an integrated electro-mechanical system. Students develop new skills when designing and making the vehicle such as learning how to code the microcontroller, 2D and 3D design, acrylic cutting using the Epilog Zing Laser and 3D printing using the CreatBot 3D printer.

A video of the vehicles in action is available here.

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Religion Catholic
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Boy
Years Year 5 - Year 12
Enrolment 1,100 from Years 5 to 12.
Fees Annual tuition fees range from : $9,500 - $12,500
Phone
03 9508******* 03 9508 2100
Address 1318 High Street, Malvern 3144
Email
enrolme*******
enrolment@delasalle.vic.edu.au
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Home » » Newington IB boys bring science to life

Newington IB boys bring science to life


The Newington College Science Superlabs were abuzz with activity when the college’s Year 11 International Baccalaureate students hosted their Year 1 peers from Wyvern House Preparatory School, for a series of Science experiments.

The labs were alive with home-made lightsabers, slinky sound effects, laser light experiments and vibrating balloons as the Year 11 IB boys guided their younger peers through experiments designed to introduce them to concepts of sound and light and build their interest in Science and Technology.

“It was a wonderful opportunity to work with the Year 1 Wyvern students and develop their interest in STEM subjects,” says Year 11 student Richard Ge. “What was most rewarding was seeing their faces light up when participating in the workshops and watching their curiosity guide and drive them in various experiments with light and sound.”

The Year 11 Science students worked together with Ms Lindsay Bosch, STEM teacher at Wyvern, to design the experiments to complement the Stage 1 Science Unit ‘Look! Listen!’ The senior boys’ relationship with Wyvern will continue throughout the year as they take on a number of Science leadership roles with selected Prep School classes as part of their IB service.

The Year 11s loved giving the younger boys a taste of high school science. They led them with flair and expertise as they carefully explained concepts and maintained high levels of engagement and enthusiasm throughout the lessons.

“The Wyvern Science shows were a really good opportunity to introduce a few fundamental concepts, such as light and sound, which the younger boys will encounter while studying senior science in a few years,” says Year 11 student Jock Ferguson. “They really seemed to get a lot out of the sessions through the more interactive nature of our shows, compared to what they would usually experience in the classroom.”

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Home » School News » FRENSHAM is full STEAMm ahead

FRENSHAM is full STEAMm ahead


 

Testament to Frensham’s innovative curriculum and resources applied to ‘STEM- focused’ studies were 2016 Higher School Certificate ‘Top Ten in Course’ achievements in both Design & Technology and Agriculture, by Year 12, and first placing in day one 
of the NSW Science and Engineering Challenge, by Year 10. New facilities and inspirational teachers have continued to support Frensham’s high rate of student involvement in Mathematics, Science, Design and Technology – a contrast to the concern internationally about girls being under-represented in high school Mathematics and Science-based subjects.

Frensham links STEM education to core student involvement in the Arts and in Music – hence the A and the extra ‘m’ the school adds to the familiar acronym.

In a world that is now so dependent on technological innovation and scientific discovery, it is essential that Frensham students leave school with the skills and motivation to undertake the many related professions linked to what are widely known as STEM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) with equal emphasis on interpretation through the Arts artistic expression, creativity and design thinking – embedded in Music.

More than 85 per cent of Frensham students are enrolled in Music Tuition as an Extra Subject.

Frensham – an outward-looking, forward-thinking boarding school.

Around half of Frensham’s 250 boarders are from families new to boarding. Increasingly, parents are seeing the benefits of ‘boarding’ for developing emotional and intellectual maturity, self-discipline and self-management, and inspiring a deep sense of personal connection.

Futurists say what the world needs most is high-functioning young people – emotionally intelligent, with strong self-management skills – young people with empathy and skill, who value other’s points of view. From their first year at Frensham, students are asked to share in organising and managing important aspects of school life, with the imperative to care about their impact.

In a recent address to parents, Head of Frensham, Julie Gillick shared the following short poem by Guillaume Apollinaire, late 19th century French poet and philosopher, to confirm Frensham’s central belief in supporting students and parents to set the highest expectations – academically and in terms of character and leadership.

“Come to the edge.”
“We can’t. We’re afraid.”
“Come to the edge.”
“We can’t. We will fall!”
“Come to the edge.”
And they came.

And he pushed them.
And they flew.

Ms Gillick noted: ‘I love those words – Apollinaire makes it sound so easy – imagine if all it took to move from 
‘we can’t, we’re afraid’ to ‘flying’ were
 as simple as one short phrase of encouragement – repeated three times. Of course it is not that simple, but at Frensham we believe that with shared commitment to aspirational effort, all students can develop the courage to strive.’

From Term 1 2017, Frensham will accommodate an additional 32 senior boarders in the newly refurbished Linden Turner House, with boarder enrolment at well over 70 per cent of the total school enrolment.

Mimi Wylie from Murrurundi NSW and Abbey O’Regan from Sydney, both with results of 98/100, placed 8th and 10th respectively in NSW in Design & Technology:

Mimi_and_Abbey_Frensham

Mimi Wylie’s app and casing design to monitor the fitness and health of horses in polo matches.

wylie-e-check1

wylie-e-check2

 

Want to know more about Frensham? Take a look at their SchoolChoice page here: Frensham

 

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