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Home » School News » Ruyton Girls’ School students are leading the way to support and improve mental health issues

Ruyton Girls’ School students are leading the way to support and improve mental health issues


The Ruyton Student Council’s (RSC’s) main project last year was to come up with solutions to improve mental health in our School community. Early in the year, as a council, we focused on mental health initiatives, as social media and other societal pressures often erode girls’ mental health and wellbeing.

As a team we decided to create a mental health and wellbeing portal on the student website, which contains a diverse range of resources that can be accessed anywhere, anytime and, most importantly, in private. The aim of the portal is to provide information in a succinct manner to enable a student’s understanding of sometimes complex issues.

Firstly, we identified the major stresses in each of our lives, which varied across year levels, and then we came up with potential solutions to help us gain information on what is still a relatively taboo subject. A Mental Health and Wellbeing Student Portal on the Intranet was developed, with advice from our School Counsellor and IT, to provide options for girls experiencing issues in their lives and to prevent overwhelming situations going unchecked. All girls are able to use this resource, as it has been designed by students for students and follows a user-friendly format.

The portal is accessible easily to students  and if there is uncertainty in describing what it is that is causing panic, the Next Step app is the place to start, as it provides a series of topics to check what the root of the problem is. The cover page is divided into ‘looking for help for myself’ and ‘looking for help for a friend.’ Within each of these folders there are links to different websites with information and support networks, for example ReachOut and beyondblue. We also added a section with different Mindfulness apps in order to help improve mental health. Our aim is to provide de-stressing activities that can be accessed at all times.

The RSC hopes that the Mental Health and Wellbeing Student Portal is useful and that it grows and develops over time, supporting the mental health of our School community and placing resources at the fingertips of all our students.

Tash Borash, RSC Captain (2017)

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees: 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
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03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » Education Advice » Known, nurtured and loved

Known, nurtured and loved


By Stuart Davis, principal, St Leonard’s College

Known, nurtured and loved

At St Leonard’s College, our greatest ambition is for all of our students to feel that they are known, nurtured and loved. These are the essential ingredients that lie at the heart of our college vision to provide an education for life. This is largely achieved through our Mentor Program, that sees each student allocated to a specific teacher who monitors their academic, social and emotional wellbeing throughout the year.

Known, nurtured and loved

Undoubtedly, as we come to know and understand our young people and their families, we are better able to nurture them through myriad challenging pathways ahead. The most significant of these, the academic pathway, is our raison d’être. A large focus of our mentors as our young people pass through the college is on helping our students maintain perspective. Central to this is the need to nurture them to adopt growth mindsets. This requires that they accept the central premise that talent, ability and intelligence are not fixed. This starting point makes them more likely to pursue behaviours that are beneficial for learning, and less likely to see mistakes as threatening, which increases their resilience.

Known, nurtured and loved
Known, nurtured and loved

How we demonstrate our third ingredient – love – is more complex. The various stages of children’s development commence when they are babies with welcomed hugging, kissing, singing and open expressions of love. This outward expression diminishes as they move through adolescence until, as teenagers, they openly start to pull away.

Known, nurtured and loved
Known, nurtured and loved

Love at this stage requires that we give them sufficient space to find their place, but not so much space that we lose the ability to read their signals. They invariably require a greater say in decisions that impact on their lives and even greater understanding when discussing sensitive issues. It is my hope that our students discover the simple truth: the more they have love in their life, the more happy and efficient they will be, for it is through loving others that they become more connected to the world in which they live and learn to move beyond the confines of selfhood.

Known, nurtured and loved
Known, nurtured and loved

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Religion Uniting Church
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Year 1 - Year 12
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Fees: 12k - 16k
$13,600 to $24,500
Phone
03 9909******* 03 9909 9300
Fax
03 9592******* 03 9592 3439
Address 163 South Road, Brighton East Vic 3187
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Home » School News » How teaching is changing

How teaching is changing


By Jake Plaskett, Director of Learning Innovation, Ruyton Girls’ School

Change is constant and innovation is optional. The world of teaching has changed, as have the ways in which we engage with the global community.

Indulge me as I share some history about how schooling, as we know it, came to be. In 1892, a working group of respected educators known as The Committee of Ten recommended a standardised curriculum that would be delivered over a 12-year period and include instruction in the following areas: foreign language, mathematics, the sciences, and English – this structure sounds strikingly familiar. Fast forward to 1916, famous educational psychologist, philosopher, and reformist Professor John Dewey recognised a need to transition beyond an industrial model of education and said “If we teach today’s students as we taught yesterday’s, we rob them of tomorrow”.

This proclamation was made more than 100 years ago, but education has yet to experience a significant re-imagination, which highlights the inevitability that change is constant and innovation is optional.

“As an independent, forward-thinking girls’ school we are committed to preparing girls to be lifelong learners and global citizens in an ever-changing world. We will build on our strong academic reputation through the development of signature learning programs that ignite intellectual passion and curiosity, challenging and empowering our girls as engaged citizens.” [An excerpt from The Ruyton Strategic Plan 2017-2020.]

Recently, our Year 8 girls embarked on the first iteration of Urban Escape, a one-week signature experience that challenged girls to build original escape rooms. Escape Rooms are a room, or series of rooms, that require players to solve multiple puzzles and riddles as they race against the clock. Our girls fearlessly conquered 15 different escape rooms across five separate venues in the Melbourne CBD. With advice from expert game makers and local escape room owners, our girls designed and constructed escape rooms for the school community to experience first-hand.

Through this process they were required to understand cryptography (the art of writing and deciphering codes), work within set parameters and physical spaces, monitor progress and create daily action plans, share resources and ideas within a group, and continue to develop as dynamic, agile, and flexible learners in an unfamiliar setting. The task was concrete but our girls were up for the challenge.

We invited the Ruyton community to join us for an interactive, public exhibition of our girls’ creations. More than 250 brave souls worked together in small teams to overcome the mental challenges and, in some rooms, terrifying surprises that awaited. The event was full of energy and our girls were so proud of their work; fellow students, teaching staff, and parents shared how impressed they were by the student’s ability to work collaboratively, resolve conflict, and creatively solve problems in such a short amount of time.

The Urban Escape Experience highlights the true capacity of our girls and illuminates the importance and necessity of striving to be more than an academic mark in standardised subject areas. It reminds us to celebrate both success and failure as a necessary and welcome part of a lifelong learning experience. As we move forward we shall continue to reimagine and redefine what successful and future thinking, teaching and learning looks like.

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Home » Education Advice » Smartphones, research data and opinion

Smartphones, research data and opinion


By Allan Shaw, principal and chief executive, The Knox School

There is no doubt that we live in rapidly changing times. The smartphone was released just nine years ago and has had a huge impact on us all. We often think of smartphone use as something young people struggle to manage, but perhaps that is not a complete picture.

Of all Australians over 18, 84 per cent of us own or have ready access to a smartphone. Eighty four per cent is one of the highest adult penetration rates in the world.

Collectively, we adults interact with our smartphones many millions of times a day. A Deloitte survey suggests our phones are always by our sides.

  • Ten per cent of all adult phone users reach instinctively of their phone upon waking up.
  • One third has looked at their phone within five minutes of waking up.
  • Fifty per cent have checked their phone within 15 minutes of waking.
  • Despite recommendations that screens be turned off at least an hour before turning out the lights, only 25 per cent of adult Australians do so.
  • Thirty per cent of adult Australians interact with their phones at night and almost half of the 18- to 24-year-old age group respond to messages during the night.
  • A third of us use our devices ‘always’ or ‘very often’ when spending time with friends, walking or watching TV.
  • Almost 25 per cent of mobile consumers use their phones ‘always’ or ‘very often’ talking to friends and when eating at home, or eating out with family or friends.
  • And a disturbing 10 per cent of us use our smartphones when crossing the road or driving.
  • Overall, one in five adult Australians admit to arguing with their partner at least monthly over their phone use.

The ABC’s Life Matters program suggests that many children feel ‘sad’, ‘ignored’ and ‘angry’ about their parents’ mobile phone use.

Professor Jean Twenge of San Diego University proposes that the current generation of adolescents are demonstrating significant differences with previous generations with reference to their behaviour and to their emotional state. Her thesis is that “The arrival of the smartphone has radically changed every aspect of teenagers’ lives, from the nature of their social interactions to their mental health”.

She writes “… the twin rise of the smartphone and social media has caused an earthquake of a magnitude we’ve not seen in a very long time, if ever. There is compelling evidence that the devices we’ve placed in young people’s hands are having profound effects on their lives — and making them seriously unhappy”.

A counter view is expressed by Dr Alexandra Samuel, author of Work Smarter with Social Media. Her article, Yes, Smartphones Are Destroying a Generation, But Not of Kids, suggests that levels of teen happiness and unhappiness are largely constant through 20 years. She suggests it is us who have disengaged ourselves from our children; we’re busy looking at our screens. As parents, we are, indeed, influenced by competing demands. When busy, we can resort to a style of behaviour described by Zussmann in 1980, long before smartphones, in his publication Situational Determinants of Parental Behavior: Effects of Competing Cognitive Activity.

He describes behaviour that might be described as minimal parenting. At this level of parenting, positive behaviours are regarded as expendable and are curtailed when our limits are reached. Although we remain available to our children, we are slower to respond and interact with them for shorter periods. His experiment suggests that when parents are distracted, it’s the encouragement of children that can suffer, more than the control. Perhaps, it is us, as parents who need to develop habits we can model to our children that help our children understand and gain from the potential of social media and smartphones.

As parents, we have a role to be digital mentors to our children, actively encouraging them and offering support and guidance on how to use technology appropriately for their age. Mentoring means talking regularly with your kids about how they can use the social media, digital access and apps responsibly at age-appropriate levels and with joyful success.

My suggestion is to have these conversations based on the values of respect, responsibility, resilience, and care and empathy with reciprocity of expectations and behaviours as the goal. Mentor parents recognise that their kids need digital skills if they’re going to thrive in a digital world and thoughtfully embrace technology in their own lives. They do so in order to offer guidance on the human and values-driven aspects of life, both online and in the physical world.

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
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Years Year 1 - Year 12
Enrolment 700 students
Fees: 12k - 16k Over 16k
$12,172 to $23,452 p.a. (including compulsory levies, camps and excursions)
Phone
03 8805******* 03 8805 3800
Fax
03 9887******* 03 9887 1850
Address 220 Burwood Highway, Wantirna South 3152
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Home » Education Advice » The power of conversation

The power of conversation


Ms Linda Douglas, principal, Ruyton Girls’ School

Writer Ursula K. Le Guin explored the vulnerable process of conversation in a piece titled Telling Is Listening. It focuses on understanding the art of conversation, where the message involves both the speaker and the listener, but it is also a relationship between the two. The message is a complex code: a culture, in which the language, the speaker, and the listener are all embedded. Ursula describes face-to-face human communication as intersubjective, a continuous interchange between two consciousnesses. Instead of alternating between the roles of speaker and listener, between the active and the passive, it is continuous and goes both ways all the time.

In a recent article in The Australian, Ruth Ostrow wrote about the lost art of conversation, questioning our modern habit to confine points of view to a few characters, to make statements rather than pose and ponder questions, and to impose selfies and self-obsessed tweets that create envy rather than connection. Her fear is that we talk at rather than talk to, with words geared to a pathologically short attention span. She wondered if we are forgetting how to talk to each other and how to pose questions that allow us to go deep very quickly; to unpeel the soul and to philosophise.

Important cues such as body language are an essential component of the art of conversation because a conversation is about giving, not just receiving. It requires active listening in order to question in a way that enables a substantive experience that stretches the imagination, or makes the participants feel challenged, leaving them with something of value. Listening is not merely a reaction, it is both a connection and an action. Listening to a conversation or a story, we don’t so much respond as join in and become part of the action. When active listening is achieved, you are synchronising with the people you’re talking with, physically getting in time and tune with them. When speaking, you can feel when you have the full attention of the listener.

As we find ourselves engaging in various forms of multitasking during a busy day, there is good reason to reflect on our important conversations. Was I an active listener? Did I play my part in that conversation to ensure that it was one of value? What did I give to the conversation? We can never underestimate the power of the spoken word and the power of being present in the moment.

As educators, we recognise the power of conversation in creating strong connections and promoting both student and teacher learning. A coaching relationship, just like a teaching relationship, isn’t about providing a quick fix or a recipe for success. Rather, the most powerful and effective conversations and relationships focus on reflecting, exploring, analysing, and digging deeper into good practice. In the process, we hope to change reflections into insights, expand knowledge into wisdom, and evoke changes in behaviour that improve performance in both learning and teaching, providing benefit for all learners.

 

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Home » Education Advice » Korowa’s dedicated middle years’ program

Korowa’s dedicated middle years’ program


The middle years are a critical growth period and a time of considerable change for young women. The new Cripps Program at Korowa Anglican Girls’ School has been designed to help girls navigate the challenges of transitioning from childhood to adolescence.

Over the three years of the Cripps Program, girls develop strong support structures through age-appropriate personal development education, daily advisory group meetings, a Head of each year level and staff who are committed to helping each girl become self-disciplined, self-aware and collaborative thinkers. The dedicated Cripps Centre is situated at the front of the school in Glen Iris. It provides space for girls to feel comfortable, be leaders of the Cripps Centre and interact with peers in social and academic settings. Student cinema nights, parent functions and service and wellbeing ‘Cripps Community Days’ complement the academic program.

At every year level in the Cripps Centre, girls encounter new experiences and take learning outside the classroom. Each year, Cripps girls travel outside Korowa to regional Victoria, Canberra and even the USA on camps and study trips. The HASSE Space School in the USA is a real highlight for Year 7 and 8 students who experience what it’s like to be an astronaut and see science in action at NASA and the Space and Rocket Museum.

Whether it’s science, sport or coding, Cripps girls are encouraged to investigate their interests and explore their skills. The dynamic curriculum encourages girls to learn without limits and to try something new.

Real-world skills are a particular focus of the Cripps curriculum. New subjects, including Technology and Enterprise, enable girls to develop new ideas, test them out and foster a sense of ‘anything is possible’. Through establishing and marketing a business, girls experience both the challenges and joys of entrepreneurship. Outside the curriculum, inter-year level House competitions, a play or musical and inter-school sport give girls many opportunities to be part of a team, take on leadership roles and challenge themselves.

In a world that changes very rapidly, Korowa prepares girls to be confident, capable young women who can take on anything. Korowa encourages girls to learn without limits.

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Religion Anglican
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
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Years Year 1 - Year 12
Enrolment 710 students
Fees: Over 16k
from $16,480 in Prep up to $32,500 Year 12
Phone
03 9811******* 03 9811 0200
Fax
03 9885******* 03 9885 8378
Address Ranfurlie Crescent, Glen Iris 3146
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Home » Education Advice » All about play for Ruyton girls

All about play for Ruyton girls


Ms Linda Douglas, principal

“Play is the highest form of research,” said Professor Albert Einstein. As one of four children, I had a childhood full of Lego. I remember long hot summer days of creativity, construction and problem solving. There were the usual disputes over who could have which pieces, and that wonderful feeling of achievement when the project came together and was finally finished. However, in the manner of the never-ending Douglas clan rivalry, it was quickly dismantled by a sibling with the desire to build something else. What we didn’t realise at the time was that while we were at play, we were also learning. That through our experimentation, exploration and experience, we were learning mathematical and design concepts; and, hopefully, a little bit about the importance of compassion, collaboration, and sharing.

The Faculty of Education at the University of Cambridge, consistently ranked in the top five in the world, has recently appointed Professor Paul Ramchandani as the LEGO Professor of Play in Education, Development, and Learning. In association with the Professorship, the LEGO Foundation has further funded the establishment of a Research Centre in Play in Education, Development and Learning (PEDAL). The centre will examine the importance of play and playfulness in education globally with an aim to produce research that supports excellence in control.

Professor Ramchandani will lead a team examining the importance of play in education globally. Their research aims to ensure that “children are equipped with 21st century skills such as problem-solving, team work and self-control”.

“Everyone has an opinion about what [part] role-play should have in early education and there is some wonderful research, but there are also big gaps in our knowledge,” says Professor Ramchandani. “We need the best evidence possible in order to inform the vital decisions that are made about children’s education and development and I look forward to taking that work forward together with colleagues at Cambridge.”

Researchers at PEDAL will work to devise and evaluate play-based teaching methods – an approach on which education experts are placing increasing emphasis as an important part of child development. The team will undertake a long-term study into how children are encouraged to play at home and school, how it benefits them, and what brain processes are involved.

Increasingly in today’s world we are realising the value of play, tinkering and playful learning. We use our imaginations to plan, predict, and understand how to solve a problem by looking at it from different perspectives and use the skills and knowledge from different disciplines. Whether it be in the workforce or the education sphere, collaboration, problem solving and idea formation are all skills that are increasingly admired and sought after.

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees: 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » Education Advice » Ruyton Girls’ School is focused on educating girls to lives of impact and purpose

Ruyton Girls’ School is focused on educating girls to lives of impact and purpose


By Ms Linda Douglas, principal

In 2014, actress Emma Watson made an impassioned speech to the United Nations to launch the HeforShe campaign. The video of her speech has been viewed nearly 45 million times, signalling that people across the world sat up and listened.

Emma, a graduate the Headington School in Oxford, an all-girls school, noted “My school did not limit me because I was a girl. My mentors did not assume that I would go far less because I might give birth to a child one day.” Emma identifies strongly as a feminist, noting that fighting for women’s rights is not man hating, but focusing on men and women having equal rights in order to achieve equality of the sexes.

Westpac CEO, Brian Hartzer, recently suggested that single-sex schooling in Australia is somehow preventing women from being equally represented in senior leadership roles in the business sector. He reflected that when he was growing up in the US, the majority of schools were co-educational. While we have a different education system to the USA, it is important to note that single-sex education was prohibited in the US public sector and remains restricted. With changes to the law and a growing demand for single-sex education, the US is now actively opening more single-sex schools. Last year, the US National Coalition of Girls’ Schools hosted the first global forum on girls’ education, Creating a World of Possibilities.

Brian, who succeeded Gail Kelly as Westpac CEO, is correct that gender inequality in Australia tells a less than satisfying story for women. A 2016 report, Women in Financial Services, from Marsh and McLennan Companies, revealed women held just 21 per cent of senior leadership roles in Australia, compared with 20 per cent in the USA. On the World Economic Forum’s 2016 Global Gender Gap Index, Australia ranked 46th and the USA 45th, with both countries moving down from their 2015 rankings.

There is simply no evidence to suggest that single-sex schooling inhibits a young woman’s ambition or likelihood of achieving a senior leadership role. Research documentation shows that in a girls’ school, girls are more likely to reject gender stereotypes, and are bucking the trend when it comes to studying STEM subjects. Importantly, every leadership position in an all-girls school is held by a girl.

Brian believes that the solution in Australia is for business leaders to focus on the role of ‘unconscious bias’ and how it works in the corporate sector, including in promotion decisions. It is this bias that we need to overcome as a community.

In 2010, Elizabeth Broderick, the then sex discrimination commissioner, set up the male advocacy network to combat the issue. The ‘Male Champions for Change’ came together to improve gender equality in their institutions. Initiatives such as this are certainly helping to generate change. The percentage of women on boards of ASX 200 companies has increased from 8.3 per cent in 2009 to 25 per cent today.

We know that change takes time, energy and resources. No one country in the world can yet say they have achieved gender equity. Our girls and women need to show grit and determination if they are to overcome this bias. At Ruyton, we believe that an all-girls’ school provides extraordinary opportunities for our girls to experience leadership, develop independence and build character, citizenship, endeavour and integrity.

As Emma notes in her address to the UN, girls need both male and female role models and supporters to achieve their potential. There is a wide range of women in our own community who provide our girls with rich and varied examples of women striving to lead lives of impact and purpose.

“You can’t be what you can’t see,” says Marian Wright Edelman, founder and president of the Children’s Defense Fund. When girls can’t see strong, interesting, female protagonists it becomes harder for them to see themselves as the strong, interesting protagonists of their own lives. In sharing our successes, failures and everyday experiences as women, we provide them with examples of authenticity and inspire them to be bold.

“Here’s to strong women. May we know them, may we be them, may we raise them.” (Anonymous.)

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees: 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » School News » Contemporary, student-centred education

Contemporary, student-centred education


By Ms Linda Douglas, principal

We enjoyed a presentation at the end of last term from Mr Jake Plaskett, our director of Learning Innovation. Jake is a product of project-based learning, being a graduate of High Tech High in San Diego. Jake gave a passionate and engaging presentation about the rapidly changing world and our responsibility to adapt to those changes in our current educational climate. As Jake highlighted, Carol Dweck’s book, Mindset, has been influential in helping educators worldwide to shape their work and thoughts on students, to engage every student in the pursuit of academic personal best.

Carol tells us that ‘In a fixed mindset students believe their basic abilities, their intelligence, their talents, are just fixed traits … In a growth mindset, students understand that their talents and abilities can be developed through effort, good teaching and persistence … they believe everyone can get smarter if they work at it.’

From this landmark concept, George Couros authored The Innovator Mindset, which provides powerful provocations, and outlines the precursors of innovation in order to empower our students and educators to be future-focused. Using design thinking, he argues that, in order to create new and better ways of doing things, we need first to understand for whom we are creating them. For many educators, innovation may start with the question, ‘what is best for this learner?’ as we strive to understand their experiences and what works or does not work from their perspective as the learner.

Jake argued the importance of creating and sustaining the conditions for students to develop an innovator’s mindset, by encouraging us to stop predicting jobs of the future, but instead inviting us to ask students what problems they want to solve, and what skills they need to do it. Jake also highlighted the following characteristics that we, as parents and educators, need to foster in our girls to strengthen their ability to innovate:

  • Problem Finders – It is no longer enough to be a problem solver; in the future, we will need to be able to identify a problem and ideate ways to address that problem
  • Risk-Takers – To be truly innovative, you sometimes have to go off the beaten path and try something unique or different; be daring
  • Creators – Innovation requires ideas, but also a great deal of hard work because, without action, ideas simply fade away rather than come to fruition
  • Networked – Innovation does not happen in isolation; ideas that are shared among many lead to the development of new and better ideas
  • Resilient – Things do not always work on the first try, or even the second or third. It is the modifications, rethinks, tweaks and rebuilds that lead to success. Resilience and grit are essential in a world where instant gratification is the increasing norm
  • Reflective – What worked? What didn’t? What could we do next time? It is important that, in both education and innovation, learners and educators reflect on process if we are to achieve the deep learning and make the process meaningful

Mindset, both growth and innovators’, is central to our strategic plan as we develop signature learning programs for our girls.

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Home » Education Advice » An inspiring community

An inspiring community


The Melbourne Girls Grammar Boarding House is an environment that attracts girls who are intrinsically driven and independent. Here, they have the opportunity to seek out experiences that may not have been possible in their home towns. The Boarding House is a unique and electric powerhouse of like-minded girls who imagine the future and begin planning for it.

The peer support in the Boarding House empowers girls to motivate and challenge one another. Boarders share both their challenges and successes. These shared experiences build a great depth in the relationships formed. Girls can struggle with the challenges of being far from home, the academic rigour, the continual development of life skills required for residential living, and navigating differences in a shared space.

They also celebrate the highs with one another. Their academic wins and their new passions forge a sense of community in the house which strengthens its connection to the school. The culture of giving back to the house evolves when the girls feel the connections and support provided by peers and staff. This forges the foundation for a robust Boarding House Council, active Boarding House Captain and Vice Captain, year level meetings and Food Committee meetings. This sense of community also helps smooth the transition of boarders returning each year and those beginning their boarding journey.

As well as being a peer-driven environment, it is also the relationships with the staff that embodies women of action, with many of the House Mentors studying Master’s Degrees in a broad range of fields and some who work for the Department of Education. There are psychologists, teachers, volunteers, sportswomen and many who have lived and worked overseas. They are strong, empowered and ambitious and share insights about options and opportunities for the girls’ future careers.

The girls who board with Melbourne Girls Grammar show power and strength and do amazing things. The school has an Olympic pistol shooter, a boarder who has an online business, participants in the National Cheerleading Championships, mathematicians, a national touch rugby player, artists and girls who volunteer locally and internationally.

To know more about boarding at Melbourne Girls Grammar, visit mggs.vic.edu.au

Publish By
Religion Anglican
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls
Enrolment 930 students
Phone
03 9862******* 03 9862 9200
Fax
03 9866******* 03 9866 5768
Address 86 Anderson Street, South Yarra 3141
School Search


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