Archives

Home » School News » Developing a Growth Mindset | St Aloysius College, Victoria

Developing a Growth Mindset | St Aloysius College, Victoria


 Credit: St Aloysius, Victoria

You see your child study hard for their exams- staying up late, tears when they don’t understand the topic, joy when they have that “lightbulb moment” and even the fear and anxiety that they will fail. As a parent you often go through the rollercoaster ride with your children as you see them work hard, achieve and at times fail. It’s joyous when your child comes home pleased and delighted with their exam results, but when they return from school disappointed and deflated after a lower than anticipated grade, this can be disheartening for any parent.

So how do you deal with these disappointing moments?

Firstly, it’s important to help your child (and yourself) put these results into perspective. Does this one exam result mean my child will not succeed in life? Of course not, in fact failure is more likely to help your child succeed so long as they focus on what they have learnt in the process- what they did well and what they can improve on. In the words of Bill Gates, “It’s fine to celebrate success but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.”

Developing a “Growth Mindset”

Developing and maintaining a growth mindset is crucial for dealing with disappointment. Psychologist Carol Dweck coined the terms “Growth Mindset” and “Fixed Mindset” to depict how some individuals face challenges. To have a fixed mindset is to believe that our skills are predetermined and cannot be changed. To have a growth mindset is to believe that one’s abilities and qualities can be improved through effort and persistence. A child who has a fixed mindset will have the belief that a poor grade on an exam or assessment suggests that they cannot do well in the respective subject and is more likely to give up and see failure as something irreversible and inevitable for them. A child with a growth mindset will see this same exam result as a means to improving and challenging themselves further, whilst building their resilience to deal with future setbacks as they arise.
growth mindset. developing a growth mindset. st aloysius crest.

As parents you can encourage your child to develop a growth mindset using the simple word “yet”. When your child says, “I can’t do it” or “I don’t understand it”, follow this with the word “yet”. Praising the effort is just as, if not more important as praising the result. Recognising the effort rather than ability is more likely to motivate, encourage and inspire your child to continue to try new things and face challenges. Praising the result may instead lead to fear of failure, which can often lead to avoiding putting in the effort all together. As a school psychologist I have heard many students say “I’d prefer to fail through not trying than fail through trying”. This fear of failure can result in a perpetuating cycle of task avoidance.

However, effort alone is not enough. Students need the right type of effort- strategies, focus and concentration, perseverance and persistence, and information- and help-seeking. So, don’t only praise your child for spending time on their studies, provide them with encouragement for seeking help from their teachers and wellbeing staff, for persisting even when the task gets difficult, for focusing and putting away the distractions, and for learning from past mistakes.

I often use the analogy of washing the dishes when explaining effort to students. Using water and a sponge alone, despite how much effort is given won’t necessarily clean the dishes effectively. Technique and strategy (i.e. dishwashing liquid) is needed along with effort and persistence. To find out the right technique and strategy one may need to seek help and information on what works best. Learning and studying require the same combination to achieve success.

At St Aloysius we focus on building and maintaining a young person’s growth mindset. We offer additional wellbeing supports through our College Psychologist to guide students and parents through this process and help them deal with setbacks and thrive through the challenges.

Failure and mistakes are inevitable and should be a part of life, for without them do we truly succeed.

Written by Eden Foster, College Psychologist at St Aloysius College, Victoria.

School Search


News & Advice
A Re-imagined Sports Program for De La Salle College, Malvern


Meriden’s new Centre for Music and Drama declared open


Schools in NSW trialling extended hours


Governor-General Presents Barker College Redbacks with Prestigious International Robotics Award


Roseville College's Learning Festival 2022


St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School


Meriden’s Tildesley Tennis Triumph


“GONNA TAKE ON THE WORLD, SOMEDAY!”


Roseville College 2022-2024 Strategic Direction


A History of Jesuit Education, Growth and Progress


Home » School News » NAPLAN Update: What you need to know about the 2023 NAPLAN changes

NAPLAN Update: What you need to know about the 2023 NAPLAN changes


New 2023 NAPLAN changes mean NAPLAN will be held earlier, with additional optional tests for year 6 and 10 students.

The National Assessment Program has made changes to NAPLAN. The improvements aim to provide further support for parents, students and schools.

The proposed 2023 NAPLAN changes include holding NAPLAN earlier in the year, and additional sample tests.

NAPLAN will take place in Term 1 of the school year, instead of Term 2. The assessment traditionally held in May, will move to mid-March. In 2023, the NAPLAN will occur from Wednesday 15 March to Monday 27.

Educations ministers have agreed to the ‘critical’ NAPLAN improvements.

“Bringing the test forward puts information in teachers’ hands sooner, allowing for more targeted support for students to ensure they are gaining important literacy and numeracy skills.”

Education Ministers Meeting, 16 March 2022.

The existing Year 6 and 10 NAP sample assessments will also move from October to Term 2 in 2023.

A further improvement is the option for any school to participate in the NAP Sample assessments.

“These assessments will provide additional information for schools that take up the opportunity, showing teachers how well students are acquiring essential knowledge and understanding in key areas.”

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA).

The subjects introduced include Science in 2024, Civics and Citizenship in 2025 and Digital Literacy in 2026. Schools may ‘opt-in’ to the 40-minute online assessments each year.

2023 NAPLAN changes. testing tables and chairs. NAPLAN.

Systems may also ‘opt-in’ to the Sample assessments. All schools in the system must participate.

The Sample assessments aim to support schools and students in teaching and learning. Results of the Sample assessments will not be available to the public.

Summary of the 2023 NAPLAN changes:

  • From 2023, NAPLAN will move from term 2 to term 1.
  • In 2023, the NAPLAN will occur from Wednesday 15 March to Monday 27.
  • Schools now have the option to ‘opt-in’ to Sample assessments each year.
  • The Sample assessments are for students in years 6 and 10. The results are not publically released.

 

School Search


News & Advice
A Re-imagined Sports Program for De La Salle College, Malvern


Meriden’s new Centre for Music and Drama declared open


Schools in NSW trialling extended hours


Governor-General Presents Barker College Redbacks with Prestigious International Robotics Award


Roseville College's Learning Festival 2022


St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School


Meriden’s Tildesley Tennis Triumph


“GONNA TAKE ON THE WORLD, SOMEDAY!”


Roseville College 2022-2024 Strategic Direction


A History of Jesuit Education, Growth and Progress


Home » School News » Message from the Principal | Oxley Christian College

Message from the Principal | Oxley Christian College


Dear Friends,

Our opening weeks continue to be eventful. Information evenings and Senior School camps have been front and centre. But the investiture ceremonies for student leaders across the college were also highlights. On behalf of our community, I congratulate all students who have been selected by the college processes for appointments in leadership. We know students will fulfil the leadership mandate in an exemplary manner as they have committed to being their very best.

Leadership is an often complex matter, having many nuances of definition and expression. It is very much a contest of faith and courage for those difficult circumstances that can sometimes emerge. The truth of a situation can be as difficult as confronting things that are untrue. Courage is essential, whereas cowardice in the face of confronting situations is contagious.

Understanding leadership is often helped through the metaphor of warfare or alluding to its strategic principles. Warfare comes in many forms. Few leaders want to be tested by the threat of war, about which the current media is full of exemplars. But we know that an enemy will cause distractions on the side, in order to get an army to take its focus off the main agenda. An enemy will try to frustrate leaders and drain their resources and commitments. An enemy will try to find out the limits of what you will do. But the ground of all leadership remains the moral argument of what is right or wrong and what’s true. The tangible expressions of leadership are filtered by one’s values and mission, and the ultimate elements of purpose. This involves identifying what one is prepared to die for.

Great nations, and I suggest, great organisations and leaders, don’t get angry. They get strategic.

While we all know at Oxley that Christ is the primary model for Christian leaders and that His teaching on leadership was that a leader is essentially a humble servant, Jesus was also strategic.

Here we are concerned with big picture dreams of what might be, of inspiring others to come on board with our mission. We are concerned with forming community, gaining resources, planning, building, protecting ourselves, and the end points of our purpose for being here. In this space we are playing what Simon Sinek calls the infinite game. It’s about knowing the games others play alongside us, and that our successes are often short-lived. Here we know that there are contested beliefs and spaces for us to work for the common good of others. It is a space in which we must be prepared to consider what is worth losing one’s life for. It requires big dreams, courage and commitment in order to lead in this space. Our trust is that our College community is also developing with us a strategic approach to raising children with their best interests in mind.

Warm regards,

Dr Douglas Peck

Publish By
Religion Christian
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 1000
Fees For current fee information, visit the college website
Phone
03 9727******* 03 9727 9900
Fax
03 9727******* 03 9727 9988
Address 15-49 Old Melbourne Road, Chirnside Park 3116
Email
office@*******
office@oxley.vic.edu.au
School Search


News & Advice
A Re-imagined Sports Program for De La Salle College, Malvern


Meriden’s new Centre for Music and Drama declared open


Schools in NSW trialling extended hours


Governor-General Presents Barker College Redbacks with Prestigious International Robotics Award


Roseville College's Learning Festival 2022


St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School


Meriden’s Tildesley Tennis Triumph


“GONNA TAKE ON THE WORLD, SOMEDAY!”


Roseville College 2022-2024 Strategic Direction


A History of Jesuit Education, Growth and Progress


Home » School News » Student-Centred Learning has Been Tailored to Suit an Online Format

Student-Centred Learning has Been Tailored to Suit an Online Format


At the beginning of Term Two 2020, Alphington Grammar was faced with the challenge of shifting our entire curriculum to an online platform, a new learning experience that lasted much longer than any of us had anticipated.

The year 2021 has proven to be another endurance test that has seen our school pivot between the very different demands of remote and on-site learning. Armed with our knowledge of what worked and what didn’t in 2020, we have made informed decisions regarding assessment, homework, lesson structures and support. The high quality of curriculum delivery has been sustained, as has our commitment to challenge and rigour; we have simply become more skilled at tailoring learning to suit an online format.

While the global pandemic has tested our students, they have continued to learn, and engage with their school community in a way that makes their teachers proud. They have displayed resilience and maturity beyond their years. However, the secret to our success is as simple as it is important: relationships.

At Alphington, the student lies at the heart of our Teaching and Learning philosophy. Student-centred learning means that we know our students extremely well. We know their learning needs and their personalities; we know who will thrive with the challenge of extension tasks and who needs additional support. We also know when we need to occasionally ease the pressure off in order to maintain a student’s wellbeing and self-esteem.

Connections have deepened in many ways over the past 18 months — an unexpected bonus. Our move to online parent-teacher interviews has enabled us to converse with parents who could not previously join us on-site due to work commitments. Our transition to progressive online reporting has empowered parents to more meaningfully track their child’s progress. The support from our parent body as we have worked together to achieve the best academic and wellbeing outcomes for students has been extraordinary.

As a staff, we have benefitted from setting up a Remote Learning Online Forum, where we have shared ideas, resources, examples of best practice, and student and parent feedback with one another.

It is important during times like these to take stock and to try to find some perspective. We are extremely privileged and lucky to be a part of the Alphington community. Our students have been able to communicate live with their teachers and support staff on a daily basis; a lack of resources has not hindered their education; they have not had to rely solely on hard-copy materials. The experience serves to highlight the realities of children who aren’t as privileged or lucky. All experiences are learning opportunities and I am sure that we have all learnt a lot over the past 18 months.

Education, teaching and learning, is continually evolving. Together we have been adaptable, collaborative and thoughtful in building an effective strategy and vision. For that, the entire learning community — our parents, our staff and, most importantly, our students — should feel very proud.

Publish By
Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 550 students
Fees Can be found on their website.
Phone
03 9497******* 03 9497 4777
Fax
03 9497******* 03 9497 3479
Address 18 Old Heidelberg Road, Alphington 3078
School Search


News & Advice
A Re-imagined Sports Program for De La Salle College, Malvern


Meriden’s new Centre for Music and Drama declared open


Schools in NSW trialling extended hours


Governor-General Presents Barker College Redbacks with Prestigious International Robotics Award


Roseville College's Learning Festival 2022


St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School


Meriden’s Tildesley Tennis Triumph


“GONNA TAKE ON THE WORLD, SOMEDAY!”


Roseville College 2022-2024 Strategic Direction


A History of Jesuit Education, Growth and Progress


Home » School News » Recognising Our High Achievers | Barker

Recognising Our High Achievers | Barker


As is the school’s custom, Barker was delighted to welcome back its high-achieving students from the Class of 2021, recognising their outstanding results and contributions at a special school assembly.

Speaking at the assembly, Head of Barker College, Mr Phillip Heath, acknowledged the many additional demands that were placed on the Class of 2021, yet despite the challenges, this cohort achieved some remarkable results.

“This group of students have set a very high standard for what can be achieved by the rest of us,” Mr Heath said. “The Class of 2021 managed and surpassed the challenges presented to them and we are delighted and proud that 200 students in this cohort received early entry offers and almost all students received their first choice in the UAC process.”

In his address to the Class of 2022 at the assembly, 2021 Vice School Captain, Harry Breden, congratulated his peers and shared some of his wisdom with the current Year 12s.

“Now that lockdowns are looking like a thing of the past, I hope that you will have a relatively normal Year 12,” Harry said.

“Make sure you set a goal for what you want to achieve this year and then strive towards that. I found the goals I set, helpful for staying motivated.”

Harry also encouraged the students to use all the support that Barker offered and believed that a big reason for his success, was asking for feedback from his teachers.

In his concluding remarks, Mr Heath said, “each student has showed enormous courage to achieve what they have. They represent the 340 other students of the Class of 2021 and we give thanks to the Lord for the blessings they have given to the school and wish them every success.”

Photo Caption: Representatives from Barker’s Class of 2021 who attended the High Achievers Assembly on Tuesday February 22, pictured with some of the school’s Senior staff, including Head of Barker College, Mr Phillip Heath (far right) and Deputy Chair of School Council, Dr Wendy King (2ndn from the right).

Publish By
Religion Anglican
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Students from Pre-Kindergarten to Year 12 including 60 Year 10 – 12 boarders.
Fees Over 16k
Tuition from $25,000
Phone
8438 79******* 8438 7999
Fax
8438 76******* 8438 7609
Address 91 Pacific Highway, Hornsby NSW 2077
Email
enrolme*******
enrolments@barker.nsw.edu.au
School Search


News & Advice
A Re-imagined Sports Program for De La Salle College, Malvern


Meriden’s new Centre for Music and Drama declared open


Schools in NSW trialling extended hours


Governor-General Presents Barker College Redbacks with Prestigious International Robotics Award


Roseville College's Learning Festival 2022


St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School


Meriden’s Tildesley Tennis Triumph


“GONNA TAKE ON THE WORLD, SOMEDAY!”


Roseville College 2022-2024 Strategic Direction


A History of Jesuit Education, Growth and Progress


Home » School News » Congratulations to the Class of 2021 | De Le Salle College

Congratulations to the Class of 2021 | De Le Salle College


De La Salle College is proud to announce Thomas Seddon and Richard Bland as its 2021 College Duxes. Both students achieved an extraordinary ATAR of 98.60.

Thomas Seddon was 2021 College Captain and joined the College in Year 4. During his time at De La Salle, he has received several Academic Achievement Awards, been elected as St Mark’s House Vice Captain, awarded Year 11 Dux and received the Brother Damien Harvey Award in recognition of leadership and service as College Captain 2021. He has accepted an offer to study Law (Honours)/Arts at Monash University.

Richard Bland joined the college in Year 7 and showed strong academic skills in Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Specialist Maths. He received numerous Academic Achievement Awards and the 2020 Unit 3&4 Biology Award. Richard’s current offer is to study Engineering (Honours) – Masters Accelerated Pathway at Monash University.

The VCE results from the Class of 2021 continues the college’s impressive pattern of recent years in relation to high numbers of students attaining ATARs in the 90s, with 2021 results in this area particularly notable given the interruptions to on-site learning. Students are commended for their commitment and organisation, resilience and devotion to their studies.

De La Salle wishes the Class of 2021 all the very best with their chosen careers and looks forward to welcoming them back to De La Salle as Old Collegians.

Read more about De La Salle College’s 2021 VCE Results.

Publish By
Religion Catholic
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Boy
Years Year 5 - Year 12
Enrolment 1,100 from Years 5 to 12.
Fees Annual tuition fees range from : $9,500 - $12,500
Phone
03 9508******* 03 9508 2100
Address 1318 High Street, Malvern 3144
Email
enrolme*******
enrolment@delasalle.vic.edu.au
School Search


News & Advice
A Re-imagined Sports Program for De La Salle College, Malvern


Meriden’s new Centre for Music and Drama declared open


Schools in NSW trialling extended hours


Governor-General Presents Barker College Redbacks with Prestigious International Robotics Award


Roseville College's Learning Festival 2022


St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School


Meriden’s Tildesley Tennis Triumph


“GONNA TAKE ON THE WORLD, SOMEDAY!”


Roseville College 2022-2024 Strategic Direction


A History of Jesuit Education, Growth and Progress


Home » School News » ACEL Fellowship | Cornish College

ACEL Fellowship | Cornish College


Cornish College is delighted to announce that the Australian Council for Educational Leaders (ACEL) VIC has conferred an ACEL Fellowship on our Principal, Nicola Forrest.

ACEL VIC honours those educational leaders who, in the view of their peers, have made a significant contribution to the understanding and practice of educational leadership.

It is wonderful that Nicola’s enthusiasm, passion, vision and leadership of Cornish College have been acknowledged in this way. The College also recognises the support of other staff at Cornish, as the judges themselves noted this year, these awards require collaborative teamwork.

“As we celebrate the achievements of these outstanding educational leaders, ACEL VIC also acknowledges the contributions their colleagues have made in supporting the awardees and their leadership. Without teams who actively collaborate and encourage educational excellence, inspirational and strategic driven leadership is not possible. Awards are presented to individuals; however, the leadership teams and colleagues of all awardees should be proud of the collective achievements which are also acknowledged by ACEL VIC.”

We are thrilled that Nicola has been recognised by ACEL VIC and, on behalf of the whole Cornish College community, congratulate her on this prestigious, educational leadership award.

For more information

Cornish College

Publish By
Religion None
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Enrolment 700 students
Fees
Phone
03 9781******* 03 9781 9000
Address 65 Riverend Road, Bangholme, 3175
Email
admissi*******
admissions@cornishcollege.vic.edu.au
School Search


News & Advice
A Re-imagined Sports Program for De La Salle College, Malvern


Meriden’s new Centre for Music and Drama declared open


Schools in NSW trialling extended hours


Governor-General Presents Barker College Redbacks with Prestigious International Robotics Award


Roseville College's Learning Festival 2022


St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School


Meriden’s Tildesley Tennis Triumph


“GONNA TAKE ON THE WORLD, SOMEDAY!”


Roseville College 2022-2024 Strategic Direction


A History of Jesuit Education, Growth and Progress


Home » School News » Innovative Digital Additions at Meriden

Innovative Digital Additions at Meriden


This year saw the trial of innovative digital additions to Meriden’s teaching and learning strategies, as well as the new must-have accessory — the Meriden face mask. 

When Meriden’s 2021 prefects buried a time capsule that immortalised life in 2020, staff and students reflected on how grateful they felt to have been members of the Meriden community during such a tumultuous year.

One of the items buried in the time capsule, which is to be opened in 100 years’ time, was a Meriden face mask, the most recent, and unexpected, addition to the school uniform but one that is likely to be here to stay. The face mask is not the only item necessitated by the pandemic that will remain with the school: Meriden utilised the period of online learning in 2020 to trial innovative digital additions to its teaching and learning strategies and the success of these additions has seen them adopted for sustained use in classrooms.

One of the digital tools that continues to support student learning is Meriden’s custom-built online learning platform, which houses digital resources that students access to enhance and consolidate their understanding in each key learning area.

Timetable flexibility is another feature of online learning that has been permanently implemented in the school. Senior School students and their parents reported that having more downtime enhanced student performance, and that older girls experienced success in independently managing some aspects of their learning. In response to this feedback, Meriden implemented “Day 2i”, where the “i” represents the opportunity provided for independence. Years 11 and 12 students now have one Day 2i scheduled in their timetable each fortnight. This flexible day allows students the option of working either at home or school and provides the opportunity to spend sustained periods on challenging or time-consuming tasks of their choice, including extension HSC subjects, assessments and major works.

The effectiveness of the online learning period at Meriden is partly due to the school’s method of supporting the individual learning needs of every student. Whether in the classroom or online, teachers ensure each girl receives timely, targeted feedback that allows her to build her competencies and, with this approach, every student was able to continue to experience academic success and growth during the period of online learning.

The Association of Independent Schools, together with the University of Technology Sydney, recognised Meriden’s online learning practice as exemplary and wrote a case study on the school’s approach as part of their research. The release of the 2020 HSC results saw Meriden ranked, once again, among the top independent girls’ schools in the state and a record number of Meriden students named among the state’s Top Achievers. These results demonstrated not only the strength of the school’s online learning program, but also the depth of the girls’ learning throughout the year.

Publish By
Religion Anglican
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 1,500 students
Fees Over 16k
$19,950 (Kindergarten) - $33,240 (Year 12)
Phone
(61 2) ******* (61 2) 9752 9444
Address 3 Margaret Street, Strathfield NSW 2135
School Search


News & Advice
A Re-imagined Sports Program for De La Salle College, Malvern


Meriden’s new Centre for Music and Drama declared open


Schools in NSW trialling extended hours


Governor-General Presents Barker College Redbacks with Prestigious International Robotics Award


Roseville College's Learning Festival 2022


St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School


Meriden’s Tildesley Tennis Triumph


“GONNA TAKE ON THE WORLD, SOMEDAY!”


Roseville College 2022-2024 Strategic Direction


A History of Jesuit Education, Growth and Progress


Home » School News » A Holistic Education

A Holistic Education


Xavier College prioritises student wellbeing with an emphasis on service

The image of a school is largely determined by its academic and co-curricular programs, its performance in both, as well as by its facilities and reputation. These days, however, more and more parents are also looking at the quality of pastoral care and the focus on student wellbeing and mental health in choosing a school. The experience of the past 18 months — with COVID and online learning — have only emphasised the importance of this dimension of modern schooling.

Xavier College emphasises pastoral care through its House system, ensuring that students are surrounded by tight-knit communities and points of contact throughout their time at the school. Central to the students’ education is the Jesuit ethos cura personalis, the “care of the individual”. The House system and the support and sense of community it provides characterise the experience of a Xavier education. Beginning in the Early Years and continuing into the Middle Years, students are allocated a House and participate in friendly competitions, fundraising initiatives and community-building activities together. Upon their arrival at the Senior Campus, students are allocated into one of 10 Houses and, as part of that, a Tutor Group. Tutor Groups consist of up to 10 students from Years 9-12 from within the same House and are overseen by an allocated tutor for the entirety of the four-year Senior Years journey. The Tutor Group system not only provides students with peer support from younger and older students, but the tutor also provides a consistent source of pastoral support.

Students are also encouraged to develop greater agency in their own mental health and wellbeing. Since 2015, Xavier has appointed a Prefect for Student Wellbeing. This student is a member of the Student Consult, a group of student leaders within the prefect body who meet weekly and always begin with a discussion on student wellbeing. More widely, there has been something of a reconfiguration of the role of prefects to explicitly include the dimension of pastoral care and to see their leadership as part of the college’s student wellbeing and safety net. During COVID-19 lockdowns, it has borne fruit in the way so many students have been checking in on mates and how priority has been given to wellbeing wherever possible.

Xavier College allows students to engage with others through its Ignatian Service program. Over a number of years, this has been firmly embedded in the school operations and gives expression to their desire to the mission of Jesuit schools to form “men and women for and with others”. Student involvement with tutoring in the Friday Night School program, aged-care homes, working with kids with disabilities and many other extra-curricular activities give weekly expression to this commitment in the ordinary routine of school life. It extends to advocacy for human rights, a commitment to reconciliation with our First Peoples and to support of refugees.
One Year 12 House President recently reflected on his time at the Friday Night School program: “The service opportunities I have been a part of, I believe, have been where I have truly learned the most about myself. I have had the opportunity to tutor a variety of kids, each of different ages, abilities and nationalities with a range of different stories and personalities, allowing me to deeper understand the diversity of our community in Melbourne.”

By giving students a greater say in their own mental health and in addressing contemporary social issues, accompanied with strong communities and safety nets, Xavier College provides a holistic education with an emphasisis on student wellbeing and instilling a call to care for those around them.

For more information

Xavier College

Publish By
Religion Catholic
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls
Years Year 1 - Year 12
Enrolment Xavier College has approximately 1800 students across our Co-educational (Prep – Year 4) and Boys (Years 5 – 12) programs. Campuses are in Brighton (Kostka Hall) and Kew (Burke Hall and the Senior Campus).
Fees Fees range from $21,000 to $33,000 depending on Year level. More information: https://www.xavier.vic.edu.au/2021-fee-schedule
Phone
Senior ******* Senior Campus: (03) 9854 5411 ; Kostka Hall: (03) 9519 0600 ; Burke Hall: (03) 9855 4100
Address 135 Barkers Road, Kew VIC 3101
Email
enquiri*******
enquiries@xavier.vic.edu.au
School Search


News & Advice
A Re-imagined Sports Program for De La Salle College, Malvern


Meriden’s new Centre for Music and Drama declared open


Schools in NSW trialling extended hours


Governor-General Presents Barker College Redbacks with Prestigious International Robotics Award


Roseville College's Learning Festival 2022


St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School


Meriden’s Tildesley Tennis Triumph


“GONNA TAKE ON THE WORLD, SOMEDAY!”


Roseville College 2022-2024 Strategic Direction


A History of Jesuit Education, Growth and Progress


Home » School News » Snowy Mountains Grammar School Breaks Ground on Stage 1 and Stage 2 of Master Plan

Snowy Mountains Grammar School Breaks Ground on Stage 1 and Stage 2 of Master Plan


Snowy Mountains Grammar School broke ground on Friday 19 November for Stage 1 and Stage 2 of its Master Plan.

Proudly funded by the NSW Government in association with Snowy Mountains Grammar School, the Stage 1 – New Learning Hub will house a wide range of stimulating internal learning facilities, equipped with the latest technology, diverse flexible learning areas, modern science laboratories, a digital technology and robotics room, art room and display gallery, a state-of-the-art design and technology workshop, conference rooms, study spaces and student and staff amenities. A key feature of the design will enable the outdoor spaces to be incorporated into the learning environment.

Stage 2 – the Sports Precinct is fully funded by the School. This area will provide access to more green space and a sports oval, two high-quality multi-purpose outdoor courts and cricket nets, and a shade structure for spectators. The fully-fenced facility will offer potential opportunities to add other recreational and competitive sports in the future. It will also enable us to expand lunchtime play areas, with more room to move and socially gather, all while looking out onto beautiful Lake Jindabyne and the Snowy Mountains.

Principal, Dr Andrew Bell, was joined by SMGS Board member, Lachlan Maclean, members of the SMGS Executive Leadership team, Mrs Kelli Wilson, Head of Senior School, and Mrs Jennifer Thompson, Head of Middle School, student representatives from across the school, including 2022 School Captains, Alexi Cross and Sam Roche, and contractor, Project Coordination (Australia) Pty Ltd.

‘We are thrilled to finally be starting construction on this project. I’m elated for our whole school community, which deserves a high-quality facility where our students and teachers will benefit from a beautiful yet practical and inspiring environment to enjoy now and well into the future’, said Dr Bell during his address to those in attendance.

Master Plan

Further information about SMGS’ Master Plan can be viewed via the following website: http://future.smgs.nsw.edu.au/ or by contacting SMGS’ Marketing and PR Officer, Brooke Darlington, on 02 6457 1022.

Publish By
Religion Anglican
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 384 students
Fees
Visit website for reference
Phone
(02) 64******* (02) 6457 1022
Address PO Box 258, Jindabyne 2627
School Search


News & Advice
A Re-imagined Sports Program for De La Salle College, Malvern


Meriden’s new Centre for Music and Drama declared open


Schools in NSW trialling extended hours


Governor-General Presents Barker College Redbacks with Prestigious International Robotics Award


Roseville College's Learning Festival 2022


St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School


Meriden’s Tildesley Tennis Triumph


“GONNA TAKE ON THE WORLD, SOMEDAY!”


Roseville College 2022-2024 Strategic Direction


A History of Jesuit Education, Growth and Progress