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Roseville College’s Learning Festival 2022


Roseville College’s annual ‘Learning Festival’ will be returning in 2022. Roseville College’s Learning Festival provides parents and families with the wonderful opportunity to visit Roseville College and see learning in action and experience the warmth of their community.

What is the Learning Festival?

The Learning Festival is an open day where prospective families have the opportunities to visit the Roseville College campus and meet the students and staff.

Parents can learn more about Roseville College’s approach to K-12 learning with an interactive and festive day on campus.

From music to drama, science to art, sport to history, food and coffee stalls, and a petting zoo there will be lots to see and do.

Things to do at Roseville College’s Learning Festival

Join a student-led tour

At Roseville College’s Learning Festival you will have an opportunity to meet their Registrar and join a student-led tour of our campus!

Their Registrar will be available on the day to answer any enrolment enquiries you may have.

Where to go: Visit the Registrar’s tent for more information.

Meet the staff

Roseville College wants to help families discover more about the College and the breadth of opportunities it has to offer.

The team welcomes the opportunity to speak with you and answer any questions you might have.

So where’s our invite?

Roseville College invites you to visit them for the Learning Festival on Saturday 21 May from 12pm – 4pm at 27 Bancroft Avenue, Roseville 2069.

roseville college's learning festival. invitation to open day.

To learn more about what to expect, visit Roseville College’s website.

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Home » Education Advice » Is VCAL over? The 2023 changes to Senior Secondary Study in Victoria

Is VCAL over? The 2023 changes to Senior Secondary Study in Victoria


Victoria is changing to a new senior secondary certificate in 2023, which will be fully integrated in all Victorian schools by 2025.

The changes combine the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) and Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL). The new senior secondary school certificates aim to ensure every young Victorian receives the education for their desired career.

“We know not everyone wants to go to university so we’re making sure every young person has every opportunity to choose the career path that’s right for them.”

Daniel Andrews, Premier of Victoria

How do the 2023 changes to Senior Secondary Study in Victoria work?

From 2023, VCAL will be replaced with the new ‘VCE Vocational Major and Victorian Pathways Certificate’.

The transition process is taking place through two main stages.

Stage One: 2023

VCE Vocational Major (VM)

From 2023, Intermediate and Senior VCAL will be replaced with the new ‘VCE Vocational Major’ (VM).

The VM is a ‘vocational and applied learning program’, within the VCE.

This will provide students with flexibility to pursue apprenticeships, traineeships, further education and training, non-ATAR university pathways or enter straight into the workforce.

Specific studies will include:

  • Literacy;
  • Numeracy;
  • Work Related Skills;
  • Personal development skills;
  • 180 hours of VET;
  • Choice of other traditional VCE studies; and
  • Time in the workplace.

Victorian Pathways Certificate (VP)

Foundation VCAL will be replaced by the new ‘Victorian Pathways Certificate (VPC)’. This is designed to help students transition into the VCE Vocational Major or entry-level VET employment.

This is suitable for students who have had disrupted schooling experiences and are at risk of disengaging from their education. This may include students who have missed significant learning or students with additional needs.

Stage Two: 2025

These changes will amount to a fully integrated ‘senior secondary certificate’ by 2025.

Most non-government schools have begun preparing for the transitioning process.

The Catholic and independent sectors have shown a strong interest as non-government schools are encouraged and supported to provide the new certificates.

What do the 2023 changes to Senior Secondary Study in Victoria mean for parents?

The Victoria State Government announced that the changes may save Victorian families up to $1000 in ‘out-of-pocket’ costs.

Students are no longer required to pay for VET studies learning materials.

cetteup-IC5sX-7PRN8-unsplash

Why are the 2023 changes to Senior Secondary Study in Victoria occurring?

Increased demand for Trades and Services

The Victorian Budget is investing $277.5 million to cater to the increased demand for careers in trades and services.

Careers in trades and services are just that – careers – with good pay, and secure jobs. And they’re the jobs we need people doing.

Daniel Andrews, Premier of Victoria

Providing an opportunity for kids to work towards a different pathway.

The real-life experience equips students for an understanding of potential future career pathways.

“We know not everyone wants to go to university so we’re making sure every young person has every opportunity to choose the career path that’s right for them.”

Daniel Andrews, Premier of Victoria

The Minister for Education, James Merlino believes the pathway has the same value as other post-secondary options.

“Study towards the important jobs that build and care for our state has the same value as any other education after school – and more young Victorians than ever before are pursuing careers in booming trades and services.”

 

Faster pathway to apprenticeship and jobs

The new program allows students to complete their senior secondary study whilst learning vocational skills.

Students will no longer have to wait till after high school or drop out to prepare for career pathways after school.

Transitioning into the 2023 changes to Senior Secondary Study in Victoria

Students in 2022 are not subject to the changes to the existing certificate. They are still able to enrol in the VCAL or VCE.

Current students undergoing VCAL units may receive credit for the VM or VPC in 2023.

Summary of the 2023 changes to Senior Secondary Study in Victoria

  • The Victorian Government is transitioning into a new senior study certificate in 2023.
  • The new senior study certificate phases out the VCAL by combining the VCE and VCAL.
  • VPC will replace the foundation VCAL.
  • Intermediate and Senior VCAL will be replaced by the new VM.
  • The changes aim to be fully integrated into Victorian Schools by 2025.
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Home » School News » St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School

St Leonard’s College Celebrates 40 Years as an International Baccalaureate World School


 

2022 is a significant milestone year for St Leonard’s College, marking over 100 years of educational excellence, 50 years of coeducation, and 50 years of outdoor education. St Leonard’s College is also thrilled to be celebrating 40 years as an International Baccalaureate (IB) world school.

Renowned for pioneering innovation in pedagogy, in 1972 St Leonard’s College became the first Victorian school, and the first Australian independent school to offer the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) as an additional pathway to tertiary education.

St Leonard's College

St Leonard’s College 2022

St Leonard’s College offers students the opportunity to achieve excellence in either the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) or the IBDP. The IBDP’s internationally focused syllabus and rigorous assessment make it the tertiary entrance qualification most respected and widely recognised by the world’s leading universities. The IB Diploma Programme (DP) curriculum is made up of six subject groups and the DP core consisting of: Theory of Knowledge (TOK) which is a study about knowledge and why people think differently; the Extended Essay – a 4,000 word independent research paper; and Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) which promotes balance and student involvement and leadership in the arts, sports and serving the wider community.

The St Leonard’s College IBDP Class of 2021 achieved a median ATAR of 97.9 which is testament to the calibre of the programme and the College’s highly qualified and incredibly dedicated staff who teach across both the VCE and IBDP. St Leonard’s College IBDP students graduate as well rounded individuals who are passionate, dedicated learners with a capacity to think deeply, critically and creatively.

One of the St Leonard’s College IBDP Duces, Crystal Lee, achieved a perfect score of 45/45 (ATAR of 99.95). Crystal chose the IBDP as her course of study as, in her view, “it allows students to explore various subjects of interest at a standard level, and also to dive deeper into certain subjects at a higher level”. The College is delighted that Crystal has been acknowledged for her outstanding IBDP achievement with a 100% Chancellor’s Scholarship in the course of her choice, a Bachelor of Biomedicine at the University of Melbourne.

St Leonard's college

St Leonard’s College Senior School IB Students

St Leonard’s joint Deputy College Captain in 2021 and one of the IBDP Duces, Luke Pan, also achieved a perfect score of 45/45 (ATAR of 99.95). Luke chose to study the IBDP and he shares,  “I enjoyed the independence that the IBDP gave through the completion of assignments like Internal Assessments and the Extended Essay, which allowed me to pursue areas of certain subjects that I was more interested in.  I think the advantage of the IBDP is that it offers a globally minded perspective through its subjects and course design, from language acquisition to the need to explore subjects on a global scale.” Luke applied for courses in Victoria and NSW, receiving a Co-op Scholarship to study Mechatronic Engineering at UNSW and an offer to study Engineering (Honours) in the Masters Accelerated Pathway at Monash University. Luke has decided to proceed with the course from UNSW.

St Leonard’s College is a leading academic school that provides students the opportunity to excel. The College’s outstanding academic results are driven by an unwavering commitment to nurturing young people and encouraging them to reach their potential in all aspects of their being.

To learn more about St Leonard’s College visit stleonards.vic.edu.au

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Home » Education Advice » NSW Government campaign highlights the dangers of vaping for secondary students

NSW Government campaign highlights the dangers of vaping for secondary students


A new NSW Government campaign highlights the dangers of vaping and use of e-cigarettes for teenagers.

The $300,000 campaign ‘Get the Facts – Vaping Toolkit’ launched by NSW Health and the Department of Education aims to spread awareness about the harmful effects of vaping.

The campaign is designed to encourage parents, carers and teachers to have conversations with young people about the long-term effects of vaping, and its effect on physical and brain development.

Do high school students vape?

Recent trends indicate an increased use of e-cigarettes, or ‘vapes’ amongst young Australians.

A survey revealed approximately 14% of Australian students aged 12-17 had used an e-cigarette, 32% of them were within the past month.

Many young people are unaware of the dangers of vaping masked by brightly coloured packaging and lolly-like flavours.

NSW Department of Education Minister, Sarah Mitchell, urges parents to report any usage in schools to principals.

“The number of young people vaping without consideration to the effects is concerning. I encourage all parents and young people to find out more and talk about the hidden, dangerous impacts of e-cigarettes”.

Ms Mitchell, ‘Campaign to stop young people vaping’, 16 March 2022.

Photo by RELX on Unsplash

Photo by RELX on Unsplash

Health risks of e-cigarettes

The NSW Government campaign highlights the dangers of vaping and raises awareness of the hidden chemicals in ‘vapes’.

“A respiratory researcher once told me that e-vaping liquids have chemicals that are similar to antifreeze… it makes it pretty obvious as to the harm it can cause to youngsters’ lungs.”

Brad Hazzard, NSW Health Minister, ‘Campaign to stop young people vaping’, 16 March 2022.

E-cigarettes can contain harmful substances found in cleaning products, nail polish remover, weed killer and bug spray.

NSW Health research found that some vapes contain nicotine levels equivalent to 50 cigarettes.

The department also warns vapes labelled as ‘nicotine-free’ can detect high nicotine levels. Students can unknowingly develop a nicotine addiction.

Evidence suggests young people who use e-cigarettes are more likely to smoke tobacco cigarettes in the future.

NSW Health provides resources for parents, carers and young people to learn about the effects of vaping including tools to quit.

Most schools have actively banned e-cigarettes and many have sent letters out to parents.

There are severe penalties of up to $11,000 for individuals found selling e-cigarettes or vapes to minors. Corporations selling e-cigarettes to minors can be fined up to $55,000.

 

 

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Home » School News » Developing a Growth Mindset | St Aloysius College, Victoria

Developing a Growth Mindset | St Aloysius College, Victoria


 Credit: St Aloysius, Victoria

You see your child study hard for their exams- staying up late, tears when they don’t understand the topic, joy when they have that “lightbulb moment” and even the fear and anxiety that they will fail. As a parent you often go through the rollercoaster ride with your children as you see them work hard, achieve and at times fail. It’s joyous when your child comes home pleased and delighted with their exam results, but when they return from school disappointed and deflated after a lower than anticipated grade, this can be disheartening for any parent.

So how do you deal with these disappointing moments?

Firstly, it’s important to help your child (and yourself) put these results into perspective. Does this one exam result mean my child will not succeed in life? Of course not, in fact failure is more likely to help your child succeed so long as they focus on what they have learnt in the process- what they did well and what they can improve on. In the words of Bill Gates, “It’s fine to celebrate success but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.”

Developing a “Growth Mindset”

Developing and maintaining a growth mindset is crucial for dealing with disappointment. Psychologist Carol Dweck coined the terms “Growth Mindset” and “Fixed Mindset” to depict how some individuals face challenges. To have a fixed mindset is to believe that our skills are predetermined and cannot be changed. To have a growth mindset is to believe that one’s abilities and qualities can be improved through effort and persistence. A child who has a fixed mindset will have the belief that a poor grade on an exam or assessment suggests that they cannot do well in the respective subject and is more likely to give up and see failure as something irreversible and inevitable for them. A child with a growth mindset will see this same exam result as a means to improving and challenging themselves further, whilst building their resilience to deal with future setbacks as they arise.
growth mindset. developing a growth mindset. st aloysius crest.

As parents you can encourage your child to develop a growth mindset using the simple word “yet”. When your child says, “I can’t do it” or “I don’t understand it”, follow this with the word “yet”. Praising the effort is just as, if not more important as praising the result. Recognising the effort rather than ability is more likely to motivate, encourage and inspire your child to continue to try new things and face challenges. Praising the result may instead lead to fear of failure, which can often lead to avoiding putting in the effort all together. As a school psychologist I have heard many students say “I’d prefer to fail through not trying than fail through trying”. This fear of failure can result in a perpetuating cycle of task avoidance.

However, effort alone is not enough. Students need the right type of effort- strategies, focus and concentration, perseverance and persistence, and information- and help-seeking. So, don’t only praise your child for spending time on their studies, provide them with encouragement for seeking help from their teachers and wellbeing staff, for persisting even when the task gets difficult, for focusing and putting away the distractions, and for learning from past mistakes.

I often use the analogy of washing the dishes when explaining effort to students. Using water and a sponge alone, despite how much effort is given won’t necessarily clean the dishes effectively. Technique and strategy (i.e. dishwashing liquid) is needed along with effort and persistence. To find out the right technique and strategy one may need to seek help and information on what works best. Learning and studying require the same combination to achieve success.

At St Aloysius we focus on building and maintaining a young person’s growth mindset. We offer additional wellbeing supports through our College Psychologist to guide students and parents through this process and help them deal with setbacks and thrive through the challenges.

Failure and mistakes are inevitable and should be a part of life, for without them do we truly succeed.

Written by Eden Foster, College Psychologist at St Aloysius College, Victoria.

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Home » School News » NAPLAN Update: What you need to know about the 2023 NAPLAN changes

NAPLAN Update: What you need to know about the 2023 NAPLAN changes


New 2023 NAPLAN changes mean NAPLAN will be held earlier, with additional optional tests for year 6 and 10 students.

The National Assessment Program has made changes to NAPLAN. The improvements aim to provide further support for parents, students and schools.

The proposed 2023 NAPLAN changes include holding NAPLAN earlier in the year, and additional sample tests.

NAPLAN will take place in Term 1 of the school year, instead of Term 2. The assessment traditionally held in May, will move to mid-March. In 2023, the NAPLAN will occur from Wednesday 15 March to Monday 27.

Educations ministers have agreed to the ‘critical’ NAPLAN improvements.

“Bringing the test forward puts information in teachers’ hands sooner, allowing for more targeted support for students to ensure they are gaining important literacy and numeracy skills.”

Education Ministers Meeting, 16 March 2022.

The existing Year 6 and 10 NAP sample assessments will also move from October to Term 2 in 2023.

A further improvement is the option for any school to participate in the NAP Sample assessments.

“These assessments will provide additional information for schools that take up the opportunity, showing teachers how well students are acquiring essential knowledge and understanding in key areas.”

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA).

The subjects introduced include Science in 2024, Civics and Citizenship in 2025 and Digital Literacy in 2026. Schools may ‘opt-in’ to the 40-minute online assessments each year.

2023 NAPLAN changes. testing tables and chairs. NAPLAN.

Systems may also ‘opt-in’ to the Sample assessments. All schools in the system must participate.

The Sample assessments aim to support schools and students in teaching and learning. Results of the Sample assessments will not be available to the public.

Summary of the 2023 NAPLAN changes:

  • From 2023, NAPLAN will move from term 2 to term 1.
  • In 2023, the NAPLAN will occur from Wednesday 15 March to Monday 27.
  • Schools now have the option to ‘opt-in’ to Sample assessments each year.
  • The Sample assessments are for students in years 6 and 10. The results are not publically released.

 

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Home » Education Advice » Battling Exam Stress: Managing your child in exam period

Battling Exam Stress: Managing your child in exam period


Many high school students experience exam stress. In 2021, nearly 66% of Australian students reported stress leading up to exams.

The main issue amongst high school students is entry into their preferred university course.

Parents can assist with navigating the challenges of exam period and minimising stress for their children.

1. Creating an appropriate environment

Research from ReachOut shows 1 in 5 students did not have an appropriate study space during COVID-19.

Setting up a dedicated study space can provide your child with control if they regularly work from home.

ReachOut suggests allowing your child to make choices about the study area to ensure they are comfortable when studying there.

study. study space. quiet study space. student studying.

The dedicated space should be quiet, organised and away from distractions.

2. Assist with your child’s time management

Children often give up studying for their exams because they are overwhelmed or unsure where to begin. Parents can assist with this by:

  • Creating a list of tasks and content and help with prioritising.
  • Creating a study timetable to keep your child on track.
  • Create an assessment list with dates.

Parents can always reduce household chores to free student time and reduce stress.

3. Make sure they take breaks

Child Psychologist from Sydney Child Psychology Services, Nidhi Dev, believes taking effective breaks to relax students is the key for studying.

Studies suggest taking breaks approximately every 90 minutes to allow for better concentration.

Parents can help organise positive break activities. Activities to do during study breaks include:

  • Stretching, meditating or walking
  • Tidying up your space
  • Grabbing a healthy snack
  • Drink water

Activities for your child to avoid during study breaks include:

  • Watch a movie or TV show
  • Have a nap
  • Have unhealthy snacks

4. Nutrition and wellbeing

Consuming nutritional food is essential to support brain function.

The number of Australian students attributing their school stress to poor nutrition has increased by 21% in 2021.

The Australian Dietary Guidelines provides a guideline for daily servings and portion sizes for males and females of different ages.

vegetables. veggies. healthy food. fruit and vegetable for kids.

 

Some high nutrition brain foods include leafy greens, chickpeas, fatty fish, nuts, avocados, berries or green tea.

5. Use your school’s resources

Utilise your child’s stress management resources available at school.

Exam stress is best managed when students are well-organised and are able to plan ahead. These dispositions have to be developed over time; providing time for students to learn how to plan and prioritise helps, along with good modelling to show what being organised actually looks like. Connecting with successful ex-students is a great way to pass on study tips and habits; two of the most useful tips are; 1. Know the difference between homework and ongoing study and, 2. Never sacrifice sleep for study.

Mr Greg Longney, Director of Teaching and Learning at Barker College

Exam Stress: Signs to look out for in your child

Nidhi believes parents often notice when it is too late.

“Their (child’s) initial symptoms of anxiety and stress are normalised. Stress should be addressed from the very beginning of high school years.”

She believes the key is better stress management, rather than delaying until their child has higher stress levels. Motivation and procrastination need to be worked on an ongoing basis.

Nidhi notes stress triggers to look out for may include:

  • Behavioural changes;
  • If your child is isolating themselves from friends or family; or
  • Not eating or sleeping as much.

She advises some tips for parents:

  • Avoid putting extra pressure on your child by comparing them to others;
  • Focus on effort rather than grades;
  • Discuss back-up options for your child. There may be different or longer pathways to their dream course. This can avoid putting pressure on achieve a very high ATAR or VCE.

Choosing a school for your child can be difficult, if you wish to receive further information please see Choosing a School NSW 37 or Choosing a School VIC 34.

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Home » Education Advice » Being Online — the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Being Online — the Good, the Bad and the Ugly


Navigating social media, cyberbullying and the online world with your children.

This generation of Australian teenagers is the first generation to be surrounded by digital devices and the internet since the day that they were born. In a short period of time, the internet has become an integral part of the digital lives of young Australians. Ask any teenager if they have used social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Tik Tok and WhatsApp for messaging, photo sharing and video streaming and most will say they access one, if not more, multiple times a day, on multiple devices.

Especially in times when in-person interactions have been restricted for so long due to COVID-19, social media is a valuable tool. It still allows people to feel connected with friends and family, to share ideas, communicate with other students, and engage with those who have similar interests — wherever they may be. However, the flip side is that social media is not always used for good, and its effects can be extremely harmful to children.

Being online all the time can affect sleep patterns, which subsequently affects learning at school. Young people may also share more information, opinions and photos than they should on social media, and this can lead them to become targets for online predators. Social media can also be detrimental if students post questionable material that has the potential to damage their reputation years into the future — for example, when they apply for employment.

Navigating social media and Being Online

Instant messaging, text messages, email, social networking sites and forums can all be used for cyberbullying — when technology is used to hurt or embarrass someone or to make them afraid. While all bullying is terrible, cyberbullying is different because it has the potential to reach a large audience very quickly, it’s difficult to escape, and publicly posted messages are hard to remove.

The effects of cyberbullying are far- reaching. People who bully online often do so anonymously, through setting up fake profiles or names so that they can be more bold in what they post. Bullying online can cut deep and make the person on the receiving end feel unsafe and scared, both at school and at home. As lots of teenagers are online constantly, checking messages and getting alerts sent directly to their smartphones, cyberbullying can feel relentless and as though the target is being bullied 24 hours a day.

Unfortunately, cyberbullying happens far too much, according to research from the University of New South Wales, which states that one in five Australian children aged eight to 15 has been cyberbullied. Three quarters of all Australian schools reported cyberbullying in 2015 (and, on average, there were 22 complaints every year in a secondary school). This means that in an average school, there is a whole class of tweens and teens who are being bullied online.

According to esafety.gov.au, in the 12 months to June 2017, one in five young Australians reported being socially excluded, threatened or abused online. Meanwhile, esafety.gov.au also says that one in five Australian young people (15 per cent of kids and 24 per cent of teens) admitted behaving in a negative way to a peer online — such as calling them names, deliberately excluding them, or spreading lies or rumours. Of these, more than 90 per cent had had a negative online experience themselves.

How does cyberbullying make someone feel?

For those being bullied online, they may feel guilty, hopeless and unable to escape the situation, alone, sad and anxious, unsafe and afraid, stressed out, ashamed, humiliated and embarrassed. Absolutely no one deserves to be made to feel this way.

Navigating social media and Being Online

Signs to watch for

Children may not always tell adults about cyberbullying through fear they may overreact and make the situation worse. Parents should watch for these signs:

• Being upset after using the internet or their mobile phone
• Changes in personality, becoming more withdrawn, anxious, sad or angry
• Appearing more lonely or distressed
• Unexpected changes in friendship groups
• A decline in their school work
• Changes in their sleep patterns
• Avoidance of school or clubs
• A decline in their physical health
• Becoming secretive about their online activities and mobile phone use

Source: esafety.gov.au

Things that parents can do to try to stop cyberbullying

The sooner that your child tells someone, the sooner that something can be done to change the situation and make them feel safe. If they are being cyberbullied and are feeling desperate, they need to ask for help. There are people who can help now.

• Don’t retaliate or reply — this only encourages more bullying.
• Block the person doing the bullying and change privacy settings.
• Report it — find out what the reporting process is for abuse on the service you’re using.
• Collect the evidence — keep mobile phone messages and print emails or social networking conversations.
• Don’t deal with it alone — encourage your child to talk to someone,such as a family member or friend.
• If they are getting threatening messages and feel like they are in danger, call 000
and report it to the police.

Source: youthcentral.vic.gov.au

Instagram for 10 year olds?

In late September 2021, Facebook halted its Instagram Kids project after concerns about the photo-sharing app’s impact on teen mental health. Instagram said it was pausing work to address concerns raised by parents, experts and regulators. This follows revelations in the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) that Facebook had commissioned research on issues such
as body image and self-esteem.

The head of Instagram, Adam Mosseri, defended the concept of an Instagram site for 10 to 12 year olds and said he firmly believed children should be able to access a version of the app — which bars under-13s — that was designed for them.

“The reality is that kids are already online, and we believe that developing age-appropriate experiences designed specifically for them is far better for parents than where we are today,” says Adam.

Before this announcement, in September 2021, child psychologist Dr Michael Carr Gregg spoke to SAFM breakfast radio in Adelaide about Instagram Kids. He provided his tips for parents to help them navigate and safeguard their children using social media, and his opinion on Instagram Kids.

SAFM: What do you think about Instagram Kids?
Dr Michael Carr Gregg: “It’s a terrible idea. Social media has been labelled social comparisons on steroids. You’re bombarded with everyone else’s highlight reels. It’s hard enough as a middle adolescence. Now we’re seriously suggesting that we do it for a 10 to 12 year old? Bad idea.”

SAFM: What are some of the impacts on children’s mental health at using social media?
“Well, we know that there are four main dangers — the bullying and harassment, the online side of bullying has been huge. We don’t have to think too hard to remember Dolly Everett just a couple of years ago. Then there’s the inappropriate content, there’s a lot of really rough stuff online, the potential for addiction and, of course, the reputational dangers. If you basically do something dumb online at 10 to 12, it can follow you through the rest of your life.”

SAFM: Do we need to have a look at ourselves as parents and our social media use?
“It’s all a matter of you supervising a little bit. Do they have the skills, the knowledge and the strategies to use the screen time that they’re having in a safe, smart and responsible way? There’s a booklet called The Parents Guide to Instagram 2019, which was put out by Reach Out, which is an excellent group and that’s giving parents the information that they need.

“Make sure that all the filters are in place, that you’ve done everything that you can to make sure the use is safe. So, I think if you’ve done that, then you can rest a little bit easier.”

SAFM: So should the government be legislating to protect kids from these platforms?
“Well, yes, especially since Facebook’s own internal research, which was leaked recently, has shown it’s hugely problematic for older kids. If you take less mature people, it’s likely to be more of a problem. And remember, you’re supposed to be 13 to be registered. And that’s a joke. I go into primary schools, 70 per cent of the kids already on it. So, yes, I do think the government should step in. And so far, we’ve seen a reluctance by government to take on social media, which is unfortunate.”

SAFM: What’s one thing that parents should do today in regards to their kids being online?
“You’ve got to look at your own use. The one thing you could do is you could log on to something called a digital license. So the good folk at Google have actually invented a digital license for primary school kids, which is kind of like the old pen license that we had at school. So this is something they could do online, which gives them the skills and the knowledge and the strategies to use safely. It’s a $10 investment, but I think very worthwhile.”

This article originally appeared in Choosing a School Victoria #34

 

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Home » School News » Falcon Scholarship for Enterprise for entry into Years 9 or 10 in 2022 – Apply now!

Falcon Scholarship for Enterprise for entry into Years 9 or 10 in 2022 – Apply now!


Calling all budding entrepreneurs – The Falcon Scholarship for Enterprise is open to new and current students who will enter Years 9 or 10 in 2022.

The world has changed over these past two years. Disruption has meant the world of work is fundamentally different, and we believe the skills needed tomorrow are agility, resilience, and the ability to think outside the box.

This is why The Knox School is launching The Falcon Scholarship for Enterprise. It wants to give students the opportunity to build these skills in an environment that allows them to thrive with dedicated opportunities to bring their visions to life.

In addition to the Personalised Learning experience of all TKS students, scholarship recipients will connect with each other while participating in challenging and engaging pursuits. They are provided important opportunities to shape their creative and critical-thinking skills while positioning themselves for better employment prospects for the future.

The scholarship offers a discount of 50 per cent off tuition fees and is tenable until the end of Year 12.

Why Entrepreneurship?

In today’s classrooms, more and more students are undertaking entrepreneurial studies and the benefits go way beyond making a profit. Students are learning how to budget, purchase stock, rotate stock, advertise and mark up stock. They are learning how to be creative, how to collaborate and how to communicate. But it doesn’t stop there.

Students undertaking business entrepreneurship also develop sophisticated analytical and critical-thinking skills.

Their study and subsequent understanding of how business advertise products effectively leads to a higher degree of analytical and critical-thinking skills as they interpret why certain forms of advertising work.

School-based business entrepreneurship explores the cause and effects of advertising while operating an entrepreneurial activity. This is especially true if the goal of that entrepreneurial activity is to seek and improve profit, most likely through using different advertising techniques. Students running their own business become engaged with the different methods and ideas behind loyalty schemes, targeted-demographic advertising, complementary product pricing and loss leaders.

Consequently, the students exposure to these advertising strategies results in a much deeper understanding of how they themselves can be targeted by big business and convinced to hand over their cash for products they often don’t need. As a result, business entrepreneurial students often develop a mindset positioned to think like ‘Shark Tank‘ and analyse like the ‘The Gruen Factor‘ resulting in a much higher degree of savvy consumer etiquette; they are not easily fooled. And that’s an awesome hidden benefit in this world.

Over the past few years, The Knox School has had considerable success in recognition of its entrepreneurial activities. The following successful outcomes have been launched from its entrepreneurial program:

  • Three Year 8 students represented Victoria in the Australian Video Game Challenge Coding Competition with their work exhibited at Science Works, Victoria (2019)
  • Two Year 7 students represented Victoria in the First Pitch Competition after designing a COVID-19 musical hand-washing device for small children (2020)
  • Four Year 11 students participated in the National Finals for the Conrad Challenge in Brisbane after developing a computer app for the gamification of healthy eating (2019) and made it to the semi-finals (round 2) of the world finals in the USA.
  • Four Year 10 WISE (Women in STEM Enterprise) Monash University, Finalist (2019)
  • Three Year 12 students represented Australia at NASA for the World Conrad Challenge (2018), and won their category at the world finals the following year, giving them the title of Conrad Scholars in 2019, after prototyping fingerprint technology for EFTPOS machines.
  • One Year 11 student won the Australian prize for the Stock Market Game (2019)
  • Two Year 10 students won State-level prizes for the Stock Market Game (2019)
  • Four Year 10 students contributed their thoughts towards redesigning the Australian Curriculum in Entrepreneurship with Foundation for Young Australians (2018)

Application Process

If your child has an interest in making ideas a reality, or if you believe they could use the essential designing thinking skills they develop in this program to succeed in life after school then apply for a Scholarship in 2022.

HOW TO APPLY

Visit the application page HERE

Publish By
Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Year 1 - Year 12
Enrolment 700 students
Fees 12k - 16k Over 16k
$12,172 to $23,452 p.a. (including compulsory levies, camps and excursions)
Phone
03 8805******* 03 8805 3800
Fax
03 9887******* 03 9887 1850
Address 220 Burwood Highway, Wantirna South 3152
Email
registr*******
registrar@knox.vic.edu.au
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Home » School News » Alphington Grammar School – Top 100

Alphington Grammar School – Top 100


Alphington Grammar School has shown consistent academic improvements over the past 10 years. In 2019 it was featured in the media for outstanding NAPLAN scores.

In 2020 it won ‘The Age’ award for most improved VCE results in 10 years for the Northern School District and this year, was among the Top 100 Schools in Victoria. 2021 NAPLAN results again indicated that the school had achieved well above the State average in every category at every year level – a remarkable achievement for a truly open-entry non-selective school.

Alphington Grammar School – Top 100

Alphington believes that every child can learn and every child should experience success. At the core of the school’s Teaching and Learning Philosophy is

  • Literacy and Numeracy
  • Very strong Relationships between staff and students – Excellent Pastoral Care
  • Bespoke and targeted Learning Support and Extension Programs
  • Staff to be Skilled in – classroom differentiation
  • Engaging Lesson design and delivery underpinned by innovative thinking                                   Alphington Grammar School – Top 100                             

“Strong relationships between the students and staff is critical to achieving measurable outcomes, maturity and growth in our students,” says principal, Dr Vivianne Nikou.  “Relationships underpin everything we do at Alphington Grammar School.  Our goal is for every student to ‘Aspire to Excellence’, but in order to achieve this we must deal with any existing social or emotional barriers which may prevent our students from reaching their potential. Our focus on social and emotional wellbeing means our students feel extremely comfortable and safe here at Alphington to take risks with their learning. It’s not stigmatised to get extra support or go to Homework Club. Smaller open and convivial classroom environments enable our students to gain a level of clarity to their learning, which can only be achieved in a safe and comfortable learning environment”.

Classroom teachers are expected to provide a differentiated curriculum which sees student learning outcomes enhanced. The ALPHA Initiative (Advanced Learning Program for High Achievers) has seen a significant increase in student outcomes for the most advanced learners and, Learning Support staff provide scaffolded learning experiences to cater for all abilities, ensuring success for all learners across the School.

Alphington Grammar School – Top 100

Schools are such centres of socialisation and collaborative learning. Remote Learning has challenged students, staff and parents in ways we have not experienced before. It has required an even more responsive, explicit and flexible lesson structure to be designed to ensure that students’ learning isn’t compromised.

There is no doubt that Alphington Grammar School is passionate about Teaching and Learning to have justifiably earnt its place in the Top 100 Schools. Clearly hard work brings its own rewards and Alphington has shown what that can look like for everyone.

For more information

Alphington Grammar School

Publish By
Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 550 students
Fees Can be found on their website.
Phone
03 9497******* 03 9497 4777
Fax
03 9497******* 03 9497 3479
Address 18 Old Heidelberg Road, Alphington 3078
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