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Home » School News » ELTHAM College’s Elite and Emerging Athlete Program

ELTHAM College’s Elite and Emerging Athlete Program


For budding elite athletes, having an extra form of support beyond extracurricular and school sports and training can be a springboard into further sporting success.

The Elite and Emerging Athlete Program (EEAP) at ELTHAM College aims to develop greater awareness of elite pathways, assist in developing and achieving performance goals, nurture future career aspiration, and foster general health and wellbeing benefits.1

The EEAP was initiated by two ELTHAM staff members, Lesley Moulin and Nicole Howard, who both have backgrounds in playing and coaching sport at a high level. The program is strongly complemented by Core Advantage, a high performance company who works with elite youth and professional athletes throughout Melbourne. 2

In 2019, 18 successful applicants from Years 6–8 became the initial participants of the EEAP, with representatives in a wide range of sports including basketball, swimming, cycling, AFL, kayaking, tennis and soccer. This year, the program expanded to 24 students, with students involved in sports as diverse as hockey, volleyball, triathlon, calisthenics, running and tumbling, in addition to those from the initial intake.

Students undertake training sessions twice a week, with additional coaching sessions in selected sports offered at various times of the year. Even with the challenges of 2020, the program has continued to run, with at-home training and online consultations made available to participants.3

Initial fitness testing and a screening of the current athletic profile of all participants helps support their development and the implementation of individual programs. This one-on-one approach and detailed analysis of each athlete enables the detection of muscle and biomechanical deficiencies, correction of poor technique, and lays the groundwork for improved strength and power outcomes. Injury prevention is also focused on, so that the athletes can continue to perform safely.

ELTHAM’s Director of Sport, Craig Seckold, says that the program has been incredibly valuable to the students involved, with the emerging athletes noting an improvement to their skills and strength. One of the students said he enjoyed meeting other like-minded students across both the Junior and Senior School, as they all worked to similar goals and helped motivate each other.4

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 690 students
Fees 8k - 12k 12k - 16k Over 16k
Fees range from $12,180 in ELC (50% child care rebate can be applied to ELC programs) through to $26,772 for Years 10 to 12; Year 9 fees are $28,208
Phone
03 9437******* 03 9437 1421
Fax
03 9437******* 03 9437 1003
Address 1160 Main Road, Research 3095
Email
recepti*******
reception@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au
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Home » School News » Ruyton believes in girls

Ruyton believes in girls


 

Excitement over the Olympics was at fever pitch at Ruyton. In addition to the Junior School girls participating in their own Mini Olympics, they also had a particular interest in an Olympian who was representing Australia.

The school is very proud of the efforts of Kim Brennan (Crow ’03) who won a gold medal in the Women’s Single Sculls at the 2016 Olympics in Rio, where she led all the way in the final race. Kim was also chosen to be the flag bearer at the closing ceremony. She competed at the 2012 London Olympics (winning a silver and bronze medal) and the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Throughout her Olympic campaign Kim has always displayed integrity. Her remarks post-race about giving back should serve as a mantra to every Olympic athlete, as well as to every Ruyton girl.

Kim’s Olympic performance reduced many, including Kim herself, to tears. Australia as a nation has excelled at placing enormous pressure on the shoulders of high achievers. For so many in the Ruyton community who had the privilege of knowing Kim during her youth, it was the journey of everything Ruyton girls represent: the well-rounded individual, grit and determination, a struggle to overcome setbacks, strong values of integrity, compassion, fairness and courage. Kim won the hearts of many through her victory, but it was her strong stance on the value of team and nation in uniting people to see hope; highlighting the possibility of ascending from an intolerable social divide; displaying courage beyond words, demonstrating the importance of patience, integrity and humility and making a difference in the lives of others, that struck a chord with so many. The girls were excited and honoured to welcome Kim in a surprise visit to the school at the end of Term 3.

In a country where the tall poppy syndrome is both endemic and defeating, it is a problem we need to face. Ruyton girls will always know they have a community that is on their side; that supports them with a wholehearted sense of pride to be the best versions of themselves; a community that invests strongly in their future and believes in their ability to make ripples or life-changing waves; a community that acknowledges sincere effort and endeavour. The sense of pride in all of the girls is as strong as the school’s belief in their ability to dig deep, do their best and make a real difference.

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » School News » Crossing New Horizons

Crossing New Horizons


 

The New Horizons program at Ruyton Girls’ School focuses on a progression of experiences outside the classroom, which encourages personal growth to help embrace the challenges of our dynamic modern society. Adventure and challenge allow the individual to develop a greater understanding of their strength and character: the importance of being a positive, active member of a community with a practical understanding of the natural world.

The Junior School camps give the girls the opportunity to develop a sense of belonging and there is a focus on connecting with the natural world. Year 3 girls catch Puffing Billy to Wombat Corner in Emerald – a fantastic way to start a camp. Year 4 girls travel to a camp at Anglesea, where there is emphasis on team building and developing confidence. At Sovereign Hill Year 5 girls explore the natural world through hands on activities and study the history of the Australian gold rush, while wearing period dress. Year 6 girls tour Canberra, consolidating knowledge acquired in the classroom and helping it to come alive. In Senior School, from Year 7 camp through to the opportunity to display leadership in Year 11 and Year 12, each experience is designed to allow the girls to consolidate their skills and knowledge.

In Year 8 there are two expeditions, one in Term 1 to build on the Year 7 camp experience and one in Term 4, to develop specific outdoors skills in preparation for the Year 9 camp. Entitled the Summit Program, this is an important personal development initiative, culminating in a major expedition at the end of Year 9 for all girls.

By Year 10 the girls are able to select from a range of experiences, specifically an expedition to Central Australia, a rafting trip and an exchange to a school overseas (locations now include schools in the UK, France, Canada, the USA, New Zealand and China).

By Year 11 and 12 the girls work together to create positive, inclusive communities and foster leadership.

The Snowy River rafting trip – a true adventure

A group of Year 10 girls, a bunch of river guides, Mr S and Ms G shared an adventure on the Snowy River late last year. The trip started in New South Wales and finished in East Gippsland. A total distance of 123km of the river was rafted, a little over 100 major rapids negotiated (in fine rafting style) all taking a total of 10 days.

The rapids provided the high-end adventure of the trip. Many of the bigger ones had names, such as George’s Mistake and the Washing Machine! Over the first few days on the river we all learnt how the water moves as it is forced down between the rocks and drops. We also learnt what to do with our paddles and raft to avoid swims and flips. Most of this came down to teamwork: picking the right ‘line’ down is a skill, and one that was developed by all.

The trip also offered other opportunities. The section of river rafted is remote, with little access. It is wilderness. There was no phone coverage, no Wi-Fi, no regular plumbing, no electricity. In many ways life on the river was a lot simpler: it was good to disconnect from the modern digital world for a while and enjoy the ‘here and now’ of the trip.

Everything for 22 people to live and travel on the river needed to be organised and carried on the rafts. Food, tents, tarps, cooking gear, personal gear, repair kits, dry bags, wetsuits, Personal Flotation Devices, helmets … there was no room for excess luggage! This is a unique way to live and offers many challenges. It only works when everyone pitches in.

The highlight of this trip for me was the way in which the girls embraced all the challenges and were able to enjoy and appreciate the experience. For 10 days we saw no other people. We were independent and able to rely on each other. It was a real and memorable adventure.

Mr Darren Saunder, director of Outdoor Education

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » » Storypark

Storypark


 

Storypark is an online community portal for updating parents on student learning. Creating partnerships with families in order to communicate their children’s learning is an important aspect within our centre.

Teachers in our Early Learning, together with the Digital Learning Mentor of Early Learning and the Junior School, undertook research to engage more effectively with families and to collaborate with them about their children’s learning. The online portal, Storypark, was chosen to be trialled.

We have been pleased with how our community has engaged with this initiative and parents are also sharing, through comments and photos, the learning the children achieve outside of Ruyton’s Early Learning. As the trial has progressed parents have increasingly commented on their child’s activities, both within and outside the Early Learning environment. There is still the opportunity to document and highlight the essence of the program in traditional ways, but Storypark offers an instant link to parents and grandparents alike, which they can access. This is another example of digital devices and technology being integrated seamlessly into our programs to enhance a student’s learning experience and parents’ insights into this. Storypark has been so successful as a tool for collaboration and communication, we are exploring ways in which it can be extended to the other Early Learning groups at Ruyton.

Here is an example of how Storypark works:

The Henny Penny Hatching Program has arrived

At lunchtime today the girls were very excited to see the chickens and eggs arrive. “Oh they are soo cute,” said Alexandra. The three chicks were placed in the brooding box in the curious garden with some food, water and a light for heat. The 12 eggs were placed in an incubator and we now watch and wait to see them hatch over the coming days.

Comments:

Steven (parent)

‘Welcome to the world, little chicks! They are so cute!

Are they keeping warm?

What are they eating?’

Mrs W (Girls’ Pre Prep teacher)

“Thanks for these great questions, Steven. I asked the girls for their answers.”

They are in a hot cage,” said Chloe F.

They are eating seeds,” said Natalie.

They are in an incubator,” said Georgia.

“Just like they were under their mummy hen’s bottom,” said Eloise.

“They are very cute now, though they were wet when they came out,” said Emerson.

Ms Teresa Wojcik, acting director of Early Learning

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » » Making a meaningful difference

Making a meaningful difference


Ruyton Girls’ School’s Year 4 program

By Ms Tanya Cockwill and Ms Cate Hallpike, Year 4 classroom teachers at Ruyton Girls’ School

When you first walk down the winding path leading to South House, you enter a unique place of learning. You are immediately struck by its thriving garden, including garden beds planted with vegetables in season, the herb garden that borders the multi-purpose verandah and the indigenous garden surrounding the pond. All of this provides a wealth of learning experiences for the Year 4 girls. It is out here that the girls roll up their sleeves and get their hands dirty, as they work co-operatively to plant seedlings and nurture these to the edible stage.

The ‘ewws’ and ‘shrieks’ as someone comes upon a snail or a spider soon dissipate, as a meaningful connection and appreciation of what the garden gives us is realised. Garden produce inevitably ends up in the South House kitchen or as part of delicious pizzas cooked to perfection using our recently completed wood-fired pizza oven. The Year 4 Mathematics and Literacy programs are enriched by the many learning opportunities to make practical connections with our cooking and gardening explorations. This is all before you have even entered South House.

Once inside South House you quickly realise it is different to any other learning environment. It is a house, and the ‘home’ belonging to the Year 4 girls and their teachers. The girls are encouraged to live and learn collaboratively. Central to the Year 4 program, in this unique environment, is the concept of community. Girls are encouraged to step beyond their own world to consider the needs and perspectives of others both within South House and out in the broader community.

Working together in the spirit of giving to make a meaningful difference underpins the Year 4 learning and teaching program. This comes about through inquiry, project-based learning and collaborative, philosophical discussions utilising rich literature as a basis. The girls are encouraged to become mindful and in tune with their thoughts, feelings and actions and how these affect them as learners and in social situations. The challenge is to become less reactive and increasingly reflective and self-aware.

Teaching and learning in South House inspires creativity, critical thinking, risk-taking and decision-making, while seamlessly integrating digital learning. The Year 4 girls are challenged to attain personal learning goals and personal excellence in all areas of the curriculum.

As teachers, it is immensely rewarding to watch hearts and minds expanding and growing as the Year 4 girls begin to make real links between abstract ideas in their learning and then connect these with real people, real situations and real issues. It is gratifying to witness our girls making a meaningful difference in their world.

 

Publish By
Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Approximately 900 students
Fees 12k - 16k Over 16k
From $13,262 (Early Learning Centre) to $33,246 per annum (Year 12)
Phone
03 9819******* 03 9819 2422
Fax
03 9818******* 03 9818 4790
Address 12 Selbourne Road, Kew 3101
Email
ruyton@*******
ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au
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Home » Education Advice » Drugs 101 tells parents like it is

Drugs 101 tells parents like it is


Get the 101 on drugs in time for schoolies

Queenslanders have just finished their first round of schoolies celebrations with a staggering 200 fewer arrests than last year. However, while schoolies ends for Queensland teenagers, interstate school leavers have begun arriving on the Gold Coast for their own celebrations. There is no doubt that the majority of these students will be exposed to alcohol and illicit substances. On Friday 21 November, Queensland Ambulance Service treated 66 patients predominantly for alcohol, five of whom were taken to the hospital. While Queensland police may call this behaviour “exemplary”, and it certainly is compared to last year, it is hardly conducive to our children’s safety.

For parents worried about their child’s exposure to drugs and alcohol, there is no need to be afraid to talk about it with your children. Drugs 101 tells parents what their teenagers are using and offers expert advice about drugs and how to start a conversation about them. Should you discuss drugs before they leave? Do you let them drink if they haven’t turned 18? What if their friends smoke marijuana or someone offers them ecstasy tablets? All these questions are answered in Drugs 101. The practical, no-holds-barred guide explains what various drugs are, how they work, their risks and how many young people really use them.

Drugs 101 deals parents some hard and irrefutable facts about substance abuse: 74 per cent of 12 – 17 year olds have tried alcohol, with a further 23.3 per cent having smoked tobacco and 30.4 per cent having tried illegal drugs. Children can achieve a dangerous high for less than $5. Surprisingly, though perhaps not for some, the main source of alcohol for underage drinkers is their parents.

Parent Guides Editor Eileen Berry says most parents are petrified of drugs and unsure how to deal with them.

“Most teenagers will drink alcohol and some will experiment with hard drugs,” Eileen says. “Parents and caregivers need to educate themselves about these substances and on how to deal with related problems.”

Eileen produced Drugs 101 with experienced journalists after caring for a nephew with substance abuse issues. They hope to equip parents and carers with the confidence to discuss all aspects of drug use with young people.

“We want to help parents start an informed conversation with their teenagers, regardless of whether they use alcohol or other drugs. Open and honest discussions on both sides are important to build trust and respect.”

While teenage use of some drugs, including alcohol, has declined since 2005 according to Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, they remain a big social problem. The growing popularity of substances such as ice has been hurting communities nationally, with over half a million adults currently using according to the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre. Ice, or crystal methamphetamine, is a potent amphetamine that is generally stronger and more addictive than speed.

This is the type of information Drugs 101 wants to give to parents. The guide profiles users and combatants on the front line, including drug users’ parents, teenagers, a police officer, a paramedic, an emergency doctor, a counsellor, a psychiatrist and a psychologist. It includes useful tips, warning signs, contacts for help and to-the-point information on substance abuse and how to deal with it.

Drugs 101 is available for $15 at the Parent Guide website (www.parentguides.com.au), or for $9.99 on iTunes (www.apple.com.au/itunes) or Amazon (www.amazon.com.au).

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Home » School News » Healthy bodies, healthy minds: a holistic approach to effective learning

Healthy bodies, healthy minds: a holistic approach to effective learning


Positive habits for good learning; sleep patterns, nutrition and use of digital devices in the home

It is critical to the growth and education of a child that they develop positive life and study habits that facilitate their ongoing learning throughout adolescence. While 95% of brain development has occurred by five years of age, the “rational thinking” part of the brain continues to develop throughout adolescent years and is not fully developed until early adult years. For children, adolescents and young adults to be efficient learners, they require healthy eating patterns, moderated use of technological devices and a good night’s sleep, If the sleep cycle is cut short, the student’s learning performance suffers.

Unfortunately, the good work of students and teachers during the day can be undone through poor sleep patterns. Even if teachers work hard on explaining new material and students pay close attention to these new tasks, learning is often negated through deprivation of REM sleep. REM is essential for the preservation of long-term memory. Without adequate sleep, over-worked neurons not longer coordinate information and we lose our ability to receive new information or access previously learned information.

Ten or more hours of sleep is recommended for children and around eight to ten hours of sleep is recommended for teenagers. Students regularly in bed by 10 pm show less depression and better coping mechanisms.

As such, it is best to avoid the use of digital media late in the evening. The light emitted from the screens of electronic media can interfere with sleep by suppressing melatonin production which keeps the brain alert when it should be settling towards sleep.

A teenager’s circadian rhythm is different to that of a child or an adult due to their hormonal development. They tend to stay up later and are alert later in the evening and, subsequently, like to sleep in longer in the morning. This is a natural part of their development but unfortunately the world does not accommodate these habits particularly well. Therefore, regular habits need to be developed and adhered to as much as possible. This may require the removal of digital devices such as mobiles from the bedroom or switching off the television an hour before bed.

If possible, the completion of homework and other study each evening should not be conducted in a bedroom but in a quiet though public part of the household. The added bonus of conducting homework out of bedrooms is that the bedroom is then a place of rest and relaxation, a place associated with sleep, rather than schoolwork.

Good sleep and nutrition are also linked. Students who are tired are likely to eat more. The temptation to eat foods high in sugar is greater when tired and this raises blood sugar levels. Higher blood sugar levels are closely related to poor sleep because it disrupts natural sleeping patterns.

A healthy diet positively influences good learning. Poor diet results in loss of important vitamins and minerals necessary for a strong immune system, good memory, physical and mental health. Low iron levels can cause fatigue and poor concentration meaning study takes longer and is less effective. Iron is needed to deliver oxygen to the tissues of the body including the brain. The more oxygen in the brain the easier it is to learn.

As such, exercise is an important mechanism for ensuring good learning. Recent research by Dr Richard Telford makes clear the link between improving physical fitness and improving NAPLAN results in primary school-age children. Exercise boosts brain power by providing additional oxygen and nutrients to the brain through improved cardio-vascular systems. The fitter you are, the faster your brain waves fire for quick thinking.

It is important as parents and teachers to take a broad view of the development of a child, through adolescence into adulthood. So many of the factors mentioned above are linked to each other and need to be addressed both singularly and holistically for best effect.

Allan Shaw
Principal and chief executive
The Knox School, Wantirna South.

References
Telford, R. D. et al. 2012. Physical Education, Obesity, and Academic Achievement: A 2-Year Longitudinal Investigation of Australian Elementary School Children. American Journal of Public Health. February, Vol 102, No. 2

 

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Religion Uniting Church
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls
Enrolment 2000 students. intake for years kindergarten, 3, 5 and 7; other years as vacancies occur.
Fees tuition $14,340 kindergarten to $23,430 in year 12. additional annual boarding fee of $21,650 per annum plus gst. these fees are for 2011.
Phone
02 9487******* 02 9487 0122
Fax
02 9487******* 02 9487 0186
Address 7 Woodville Ave, Wahroonga 2076
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Home » Education Advice » Pack a healthy choice

Pack a healthy choice


Life is busy, especially for the full-time parent who has to get the kids out of bed, dressed, fed, and out the door for school, before heading off for their own full day of work. When you’re feeling time-poor, the easy choices, the shortcuts that make you forget to craft that healthy sandwich for your kids, become the norm. Soon, instead of a healthy lunch and a full day of energy, your kids get a pack of Twisties, a sugar loaded muesli bar. They are falling asleep at their desk for the final two hours of the day. It makes for unhealthy habits.

So how do you make healthy habits? It starts, of course, with the lunchbox.

Healthy choices

Don’t give your kids a choice! On your weekly grocery rounds, buy apples instead of muesli bars, cheese instead of chocolate, carrots instead of chips — we all know children can be difficult, and often lunchboxes come home not quite empty, but if all you give them are healthy choices, chances are they will eat some of it. By not giving your children the option of an unhealthy choice, you are teaching them to substitute a healthy snack for a treat.

That is not to say that your children should not have a choice: find out why things weren’t eaten and what your children enjoy. If you give your children a choice of what healthy items they would like to eat, they begin to feel empowered to make their own healthy decisions.

The Right Lunchbox

Make preparing the meal easy for you. NUDE Food Movers has a variety of lunchboxes that simply take the decision out of your hands: the Sandwich Box, the Snack Box, the Snack Tubes that click together and make it easy for your child to eat their meals throughout the day, the Yogurt Mover, the Snack and Dip box and the Fruity Mover, available from Woolworths, Coles, Big W, Officeworks, Target and Kmart all year round in different colours and sizes. These lunchboxes simplify the decision of what your child should eat. Moreover, by separating the lunchboxes into individual components, your child can have something different everyday, which means more variety and more flexibility to your morning routine.

Clean living

The NUDE Food Movers make it easy for your child to clean up after themselves. All their leftovers can be placed back in the container without affecting other elements of the lunchbox. It is better for the environment; you are not only saving the school grounds from scores of discarded rubbish, but are teaching your kids to dispose of rubbish responsibly, at home, where you can keep an eye on them. It’s all about forming healthy habits.

Let your kids do it

The best way to teach your kids is to have them make it themselves. Lunchboxes like NUDE’s Rubbish Free Lunchbox and EnviroBox are compartmentalised precisely so that you or your kids can fill them. Not only does it separate foods to avoid cross contamination, but the compartments offer the right proportions for your kids. The SmashBox from Smash is not only compartmentalised for different snacks, but has a detachable insulated jacket to keep food cold for those early, hot Back to School days. All these lunchboxes are dishwasher friendly and durable for the rough and tumble of the schoolyard.

Your kids can organise their own lunches according to each compartment. This makes for a well-proportioned varied lunchbox. And, by letting them try themselves, you are also empowering them to make their own choices, and letting them reap the rewards of their own efforts. These are foods that they have chosen after all, making it more likely that they’ll eat everything.

Lead by example

Children need choices, but healthy choices, and it all begins with the lunchbox. How you treat the lunchbox is an important step to forming healthy habits, not only in your children, but also in yourself.

So try it yourself. Buy your own lunchbox, make your own lunch. Put yourself in a position of healthy eating and your kids will do the same.

Words: Alana Lopez

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Home » Education Advice » Where Are They Now?

Where Are They Now?


2 Graduates from Victorian secondary schools share their stories of success and inspiration in sports, and explain how their education got them to where they are today

Sam Bramham: Paralympian, graduated from Ivanhoe Grammar School 2007

Sam Bramham certainly entered Paralympic competition with a splash when he broke the 100m Butterfly world record at the 2004 Athens Paralympic Games. This was his first Paralympic games at the mere age of 16 all while still attending Ivanhoe Grammar School. Since then he has travelled the world claiming golds and breaking records at events such as the 2006 Melbourne Commonwealth Games, 2007 South African World Championship and 2008 Beijing Paralympics. In 2009 Sam was awarded with the Order of Australia Medal for services to his country and for being a role model for his younger team mates.

Sam was introduced to swimming while at school through the Ivanhoe Grammar Sports Program. After Year 12, Sam went on to study Architecture and then moved to a Sports Marketing and Law degree at La Trobe University. Sam now works in the sports sector, managing athletes, consulting and supporting young kids with disabilities. Sam also dedicates a lot of time to philanthropic and charity work, and plans to motor cycle around India in July 2015 to raise money for MS research. Sam attributes his interest in helping others through participation in Round Square programs while at school.

Kim Crow: World Champion Rower, graduated from Ruyton Girls’ School in 2003

Former Ruyton Girls’ School student Kim Crow, reflects on her years at Ruyton as a holistic and nurturing experience that helped her to pursue her athletic dreams.

While at Ruyton Kim thrived both academically and athletically, as Dux of her year in 2003 with an ATAR of 99.95 as well as being a World Youth silver medalist in the 400m hurdles. When asked about her time at Ruyton she says there was always a culture of having a go both inside and outside the classroom.

Kim is now a World Champion in rowing, winning the blue-riband single sculls at this year’s World Championships in South Korea. She was the only rower to race in two events at the 2012 Olympic Games, and emerged with two medals – silver in the double sculls and bronze in the single sculls. In 2013 she was named the female crew of the year by FISA, the world governing body of rowing. She has since raced internationally in all Olympic boat classes, and has been elected Captain of the Australian Rowing Team.

Kim graduated from her Melbourne University Media and Communications / Law degree with first class honours and was the top female graduate for her year. She was an intern at the Court of Arbitration of Sport in Lausanne, Switzerland, and now works as a lawyer at Arete Group in Canberra.

Kim says, “School is as much about growing and learning about yourself as it is about formal education,” and credits her success to the years spent at Ruyton Girls’ School.

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Home » Education Advice » Melbourne – The City For Students

Melbourne – The City For Students


International survey affirms Melbourne as a cultural and educational hub

Melbourne’s position as the cultural capital of  Australia has been confirmed and complemented by our ranking as the second best student city in the world and the best city for student diversity.

A recent survey by QS Top Universities gave Melbourne this flattering rating but our area of excellence was for welcoming International Students into our student population.

The fabric of Australia has cultural diversity deeply woven in and this cultural heartbeat beats stronger in nowhere other than Melbourne.

Our student population is a testament to this with the City of Melbourne citing that almost 55% of students living and studying in our city are International.

Paris led the QS Top Universities ratings as the best city in the world to be a student but impressively, Melbourne bumped London from second place.

While we may not have an Eiffel Tower or a thriving crepe industry, Melbourne’s diverse range of universities can offer something for everybody.

A historically interesting building at Melbourne University is as charming as RMIT is innovative and spunky. Meanwhile, Monash explicitly welcomes International Students with a whole day of celebration dedicated to them.

In general, the survey looked at a range of criteria including pollution, safety and cultural tolerance so in general, Melbourne is ticking a lot of boxes.

So whether you are from Australia or abroad, you can feel that little bit better about the university grind knowing that, as Melbournian uni students, we almost have it the best in the world.

Words: Georgina Owen

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