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Meriden Cadets Receive Penultimate Award


Three Meriden cadets have been commended on their completion of the National Adventure Training Award, the penultimate award in the Cadets program.

WO2 Bruna Da Costa, WO2 Eduarda Da Costa and WO2 Lillian Havansky were presented with the coveted “boomerang and torch” badge after passing the rigorous five-day challenge with flying colours. The badge is the highest accolade that can be worn on a cadet’s uniform and the students are the first Meriden cadets to attempt and complete the challenge as part of the Trinity Grammar School Army Cadet Unit.

LT (AAC) Fiona Brennan, Meriden Coordinator of Cadets, said the School is proud of the girls who have completed another first for their unit.

“WO2 B Da Costa, WO2 E Da Costa and WO2 Havansky have opened a new door for Meriden cadets and shown how satisfying it can be to persevere through difficult challenges,” she said.

“The NATA is an institution among cadets and is known for bringing cadets face-to-face with the unexpected. The girls, who have shown that they are strong, responsible and self-reliant leaders within our cadet unit, continued to display these qualities in a challenging, unfamiliar environment.”

“Our cadets were commended by rank members on their decision-making, observation and leadership skills and for embodying the Australian Army Cadets program values of Courage, Initiative, Respect and Teamwork throughout the NATA,” LT Brennan said.

2

The National Adventure Training Award is known for its physically-demanding challenges and for providing opportunities for senior cadets to step into leadership roles in high-pressure situations. Meriden cadets undertook extensive training for the event and the girls completed a series of pre-selection tests to ensure they met satisfactory levels of personal skill and fitness before embarking on the Award.

The Award sees teams of cadets test the skills they have learnt through the program, including watermanship, bush navigation and survival skills, as well as physical and mental endurance.

They are mentored by active members of the Australian Defence Force as they walk cross country and undertake a series of complex tasks that test their logic, teamwork and initiative. Cadets are individually assessed on activities such as day and night navigation, casualty evacuation and field engineering, which examines their skill with knots and lashings. The field activities are designed to be the most physically demanding tasks in which cadets can participate.

The final milestone in the Cadets program looms for WO2 B Da Costa, WO2 E Da Costa and WO2 Havansky – the Chief of Army Cadet Team Challenge – during which they will walk more that seventy kilometres cross country and complete a range of difficult tasks.

For more information

Meriden

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Religion Anglican
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 1,500 students
Fees Over 16k
$19,950 (Kindergarten) - $33,240 (Year 12)
Phone
(61 2) ******* (61 2) 9752 9444
Address 3 Margaret Street, Strathfield NSW 2135
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Meriden Cadets Receive Penultimate Award


Home » Education Advice » Education options in NSW

Education options in NSW


While the broad range of schooling options currently open to parents reflects a well-developed and thriving educational system, the choices can be a little overwhelming. Here, we explain all available educational options and school types in NSW to help parents with their decision.

The choice within the NSW public school system has greatly increased in recent years. Your child is automatically entitled to a place in their local high school, but you can also apply for a place at non-local high schools, such as single-gender, specialist, selective, sports or agricultural high schools. You can potentially take advantage of increased specialisation in the public education system.

Some restrictions do apply. Students from outside a school’s designated local enrolment area can be offered a place only if space permits after local students have been accommodated. Additionally, schools such as selective and agricultural high schools have special enrolment criteria based on academic merit.

Selective and agricultural schools

Currently in NSW, there are 17 fully selective schools, four selective agricultural high schools, 25 high schools with selective classes and a virtual selective class provision (Western NSW Region).

The aim of selective high schools is to provide a scholastically challenging environment for more academically able students. The usual range of subjects is taught at these schools, but they are geared towards the needs of gifted and talented students. Partially selective high schools offer both selective classes and community-based classes. Students gain places at selective schools by competing academically with other prospective students.

There are differing opinions on the benefits of selective schools. Some education experts argue that talented children should be educated with their intellectual peers, thus benefiting from the intellectual stimulation this grouping provides. Others argue for the comprehensive system, claiming students benefit more from a wider range of mixed abilities and attitudes.

Qualifying for a selective school

Entry into these schools is determined by the student’s results in the Selective High School Placement Test in English (including reading and writing), mathematics and general ability, together with their primary school’s assessment of their performance in English and mathematics. Other evidence of academic merit may also be considered.

Parents wishing to apply on behalf of their child for Year 7 can do so online via the NSW Public Schools website, schools.nsw.edu.au. Students throughout the state sit for the Selective High School Placement Test in designated test centres on a specified date. Applications and results are considered by a selection committee, which will also take into account circumstances where a child has a sensory or physical disability or is from a non-English-speaking background.

Agricultural high schools are selective high schools that specialise in agricultural studies. Students wishing to enrol in day places at agricultural high schools are selected in much the same way as those in selective high schools. Boarding places for all years are offered at Hurlstone (boarding and day), Yanco (boarding only) and Farrer Memorial (boarding and day). Hurlstone and Yanco are both co-educational while Farrer accepts boys only. Offers of boarding placements in agricultural high schools take students’ geographic isolation and their ability to cope in a boarding situation into consideration.

For more information about selective schools, consult your government primary school principal or phone the Selective High School and Opportunity Class Placement Unit on 02 9707 6262 or your regional office on 13 15 36.

Selective high schools

  • Baulkham Hills High
  • Caringbah High
  • Fort Street High
  • Girraween High
  • Gosford High School
  • Hornsby Girls High
  • Merewether High
  • Normanhurst Boys High
  • Northern Beaches Secondary College, Manly Campus
  • North Sydney Boys High
  • North Sydney Girls High
  • Penrith High
  • Smiths Hill High
  • St George Girls High
  • Sydney Boys High
  • Sydney Girls High
  • Sydney Technical High

High schools with selective classes

  • Alexandria Park Community School
  • Armidale High, Armidale
  • Auburn Girls High
  • Blacktown Boys High
  • Blacktown Girls High
  • Bonnyrigg High School
  • Chatswood High School
  • Duval High, Armidale
  • Elizabeth Macarthur High
  • Gorokan High School
  • Grafton High, Grafton
  • Granville Boys High School
  • Karabar High, Queanbeyan
  • Kooringal High, Wagga Wagga
  • Macquarie Fields High School
  • Moorebank High School
  • Parramatta High School
  • Peel High School, Tamworth
  • Prairiewood High School
  • Rose Bay Secondary College
  • Ryde Secondary College
  • Sefton High School
  • Sydney Secondary College, Balmain Campus
  • Sydney Secondary College, Blackwattle Bay Campus
  • Sydney Secondary College, Leichhardt Campus
  • Tempe High School

Agricultural high schools

  • Farrer Memorial Agricultural
  • High School, Tamworth
  • Hurlstone Agricultural High School, Glenfield
  • James Ruse Agricultural High School, Carlingford
  • Yanco Agricultural High School, Yanco
  • Sports high schools

Specialist schools

Specialist high schools teach the NSW Board of Studies core curriculum while also placing emphasis on a particular area of learning. This type of school may be beneficial for your child if they show talent for and wish to specialise in the area of creative arts, performing arts, sports, technology or languages. A sports high school, for example, maybe suitable for your child if they show the potential to reach elite sports level.

Creative and performing arts high schools provide opportunities for students to pursue excellence within these fields while studying the core curriculum prescribed by the Board of Studies. These schools offer a specialised environment. They have performance and creative spaces, lighting and sound systems, dance studios and specialist teachers.

Each school’s facilities are tailored to the particular area of specialty. Entry to a specialist school is based on the student meeting certain criteria. For entry to a performing arts school, for example, the application process may include an audition.

Distance education centres are also part of the network of specialist high schools.
For further information, go to schools.nsw.edu.au/schoolfind/types/index.php

Sports high schools

  • Endeavour Sports High School
  • The Hills Sports High School
  • Hunter Sports High School
  • Illawarra Sports High School
  • Matraville Sports High School
  • Narrabeen Sports High School
  • Westfields Sports High School

Creative and performing arts high schools

  • Campbelltown Performing Arts High School
  • Conservatorium High School
  • Granville South Creative and Performing Arts High School
  • Hunter School of the Performing Arts
  • Ku-ring-gai Creative Arts High School
  • Nepean High School for the Creative and Performing Arts
  • Newtown High School of the Performing Arts
  • Northmead Creative and Performing Arts High School
  • Wollongong High School of the Performing Arts

Technology high schools

There are specialist technology high schools covering technology, rural technology and marine technology.

Technology high schools have a whole-school focus on technology across all Key Learning Areas. Students learn to select and use a wide range of technologies. An emphasis is placed on the impact of technology on the environment and society. This is not at the exclusion of any subject areas. These schools all offer a comprehensive curriculum but there is a commitment to using and fostering an understanding of new technologies in all areas of study.

Language high schools

Language high schools are comprehensive high schools that provide students with an opportunity to study at least two languages other than English. They ensure continuity of study to the Higher School Certificate. A flexible curriculum allows some students to undertake in-depth language study for an extended period and/or to study more than one language.
Language high schools develop and implement innovative methods of teaching languages and offer assistance to other schools in this field.

Language high schools do not offer all languages and many specialise in only a few. However, where there is student interest in languages not available at the school, students may apply to study the language through The Open High School or the Saturday School of Community Languages.

Of course, substantial language programs are also provided by many other schools, both government and non-government. Some schools provide opportunities to study languages spoken by significant numbers of the student population.

Languages high schools

  • Blakehurst High School
  • Kirrawee High School
  • Prairiewood High School
  • Strathfield Girls High School
  • Tempe High School

Multi-campus colleges

A multi-campus college comprises a number of campuses that work together as a single educational entity across a number of separate sites. Each campus is usually specialised in the sense that it targets the needs and interests of a particular group of students. For example, junior secondary campuses are designed to support the learning needs of young adolescents, while senior secondary campuses are designed to provide a more adult learning environment for post-compulsory students. A number of multi-campus colleges are co-located with TAFE and university campuses.

Multi-campus colleges
Brisbane Water Secondary College
Umina Campus
Woy Woy Campus
Callaghan College
Jesmond Campus
Wallsend Campus
Waratah Technology Campus
Chifley College
Bidwill Campus
Dunheved Campus
Mount Druitt Campus
Senior Campus
Shalvey Campus
Dubbo College
Delroy Campus
Senior Campus
South Campus
Georges River College
Hurstville Boys Campus
Oatley Senior Campus
Peakhurst Campus
Penshurst Girls Campus
Great Lakes College
Forster Campus
Tuncurry Junior Campus
Tuncurry Senior Campus
Moree Secondary College
Albert St Campus
Carol Ave Campus
Nirimba Collegiate Group
Quakers Hill High School
Riverstone High School
Seven Hills High School
Wyndham College
Northern Beaches Secondary College
Balgowlah Boys Campus
Cromer Campus
Freshwater Senior Campus
Mackellar Girls Campus
Manly Campus
Sydney Secondary College
Balmain Campus
Blackwattle Bay Campus
Leichhardt Campus
Tuggerah Lakes Secondary College
Berkeley Vale Campus
The Entrance Campus
Tumbi Umbi Campus
Walgett Community College
Primary School
High School

Rural and distance education

The Department of Education has distance education provisions in place to deliver full-time educational programs to students who are isolated or whose special circumstances prevent them from attending school on a regular basis. Single-subject (Years 9 to 12) programs are also provided to specific categories of students. Schools in remote areas are also given support through the NSW Country Areas Program (CAP). Distance education provision is available from 16 locations across the state.

Primary

  • Bourke Walgett School of Distance Education (4644) — Bourke Campus
  • Bourke Walgett School of Distance Education (4644) — Walgett Campus
  • North East Public School of Distance Education (4643) — Casino Campus
  • North East Public School of Distance Education (4643) — Port Macquarie Campus
  • Queanbeyan Public School (2922)
  • School of the Air (5302) — Broken Hill Campus
  • School of the Air (5302) — Hay Campus
  • Sydney Distance Education Primary School (4586)
  • Tibooburra Outback School of the Air (3211)

Secondary

  • Camden Haven High School (4428)
  • Karabar High School (8524)
  • Open High School (8588)
  • Sydney Distance Education High School (8587) K–12
  • Distance Education Support Unit — Sir Eric Woodward Memorial School (special education) (5675)
  • Dubbo School of Distance Education (P–12) (4587)
  • Southern Cross School (4428)

Saturday School of Community Languages

Saturday School of Community Languages teaches languages to students from government and non-government secondary schools or from TAFE HSC programs who wish to study their background community language to Record of School Achievement (RoSA) and Higher School Certificate levels but are unable to do so at their home school. Courses are available in 24 languages at Higher School Certificate level. These include Arabic, Armenian, Bengali (Bangla), Bosnian, Chinese, Croatian, Dutch, Filipino, Hindi, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Khmer, Korean, Macedonian, Modern Greek, Maltese, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Serbian, Spanish, Turkish, Ukrainian and Vietnamese. A Bosnian class is also on offer at Liverpool Girls High. There are approximately 3400 students enrolled in the Saturday school in Years 7 to 12 at the following campuses:

  • Arthur Phillip High School
  • Ashfield Boys High School
  • Bankstown Girls High School
  • Birrong Boys High School
  • Birrong Girls High School
  • Chatswood High School
  • Dulwich High
  • Kogarah High
  • Liverpool Boys High School
  • Liverpool Girls High School
  • Merewether High School
  • Randwick North High School
  • St George Girls High School
  • Strathfield Girls High School
  • Smiths Hill High School
  • The Hills Sports High School

The Saturday School of Community Languages can be contacted on 02 7814 2115, saturdaycl-h.school@det.nsw.edu.au or saturdaycl-h.schools.nsw.gov.au

Secondary Intensive English Centres and the Intensive English High School

Newly arrived secondary-aged students requiring intensive English as a Second Language (ESL) support in metropolitan Sydney and Wollongong may be able to enrol in an Intensive English Centre (IEC) or the Intensive English High School (IEHS) before transferring to high school.

IECs and the IEHS provide intensive ESL tuition to recently arrived, high-school-aged students whose first language is not English. The IECs/IEHS provide English language, orientation, settlement and welfare programs to prepare students for study in a NSW high school. To be eligible for enrolment in an IEC/IEHS, students must be of high school age and meet eligibility requirements relating to the need for intensive ESL support, and will need to provide the date of arrival in Australia and residency status. In certain cases, Year 6 students may transfer from a primary school to an IEC/IEHS to prepare for entry to high school the following year.

In rural and regional areas where there is no IEC, newly arrived ESL students enrol in their local school where they may be eligible to receive additional short-term ESL support.

Senior high schools

Senior high schools are comprehensive high schools that cater exclusively for senior students from Years 10 or 11 to 12. As the focus in these schools is on senior students, they are able to develop and employ more flexible and innovative curriculum timetabling arrangements to suit the needs of young adults.

Senior high schools offer a more adult learning environment than most other high schools. Students are given opportunities and support as they develop maturity and independence. Some of the best features of tertiary-style, independent learning are combined with the more supportive, welfare-oriented secondary education culture.

In terms of curriculum, a focus on the senior years allows senior high schools to deliver a wider range of courses in the senior domain, including special accreditation arrangements with TAFE and industry. Senior high schools in Sydney and surrounds include:

  • Bankstown Senior College
  • Bradfield College
  • Brisbane Water Secondary College, Woy Woy campus
  • Callaghan College, Jesmond Senior Campus
  • Chifley College Senior Campus
  • Coffs Harbour Senior College
  • Georges River College, Oatley Senior Campus
  • Illawarra Senior College
  • Northern Beaches Secondary College, Freshwater Senior Campus
  • St Marys Senior High
  • Sydney Secondary College, Blackwattle Bay Campus
  • Wyndham College, Nirimba Collegiate Group

Trade schools

Trade schools are designed to link schools with industry and TAFE to tackle skills shortages. Currently, 26 trade schools are open for enrolments in NSW. About half of these will be based in existing high schools and provided with upgraded industry-standard facilities. The other half will consist of school-TAFE partnerships using existing TAFE facilities.

Students in trade schools will have the option of undertaking a school-based apprenticeship, a school-based traineeship or other vocational course while completing their HSC. Students will have access to specialist industry-standard facilities.

Students will also have access to new industry support services that will place them in jobs to complete their training. Industry and the local economy benefit from having more job-ready graduates able to take on work in key skills-shortage areas. For more information, visit education.nsw.gov.au/teaching-and-learning/curriculum/career-learning-and-vet.

Non-government schools

Today, the number of non-government schools is almost as numerous as the number of religious affiliations that abound. You can choose to send your child to a traditional Protestant church school, traditional independent school, Catholic systemic school, Catholic independent school, Jewish school, Greek Orthodox school, Muslim school … the list goes on.

As well as the non-government schools associated with particular religious groups, there are many non-religious alternative education schools such as the Montessori and Steiner schools.
Non-government schools must operate within certain legislated boundaries irrespective of their religious affiliation, educational philosophy and methods. The BOSTES is responsible for monitoring the compliance of non-government schools with the registration and accreditation requirements of the Education Act 1990. Registration is a non-government school’s licence to operate under the Act.

Accreditation authorises a non-government school to present candidates for the Record of School Achievement (RoSA) and/or Higher School Certificate. All schools are required to teach the NSW syllabus.

The Commonwealth and state governments each provide per-capita grants and other assistance to non-government schools to help meet their costs. The level of that support varies between schools. The balance must be made up by the schools through fees and other forms of fundraising, which may be a determining factor in your choice of school.

If you are interested in private education for your child, it’s a good idea to make an appointment with the school and discuss their philosophical and religious rationale. This will provide you with a better idea of how suitable the school is for you and your child.

Traditional independent schools

Although it’s difficult to generalise, it can be said that traditional grammar-type schools base their educational instruction broadly on Christian principles. Generally, the foundation of their education system is the English public school model.

Among the attractive features of most of these schools are their on-site facilities, which are generally of a high standard. All schools in this category tend to have high fees and long waiting lists.

Catholic schools

About 20 per cent of students in Australia attend Catholic schools. The first Catholic school was established in 1821 in Sydney’s Parramatta and has grown into a system of approximately 1700 schools nationwide.

Catholic schools are divided into two categories: independent (private colleges run independently by religious congregations) and systemic (a network of parish primary and regional secondary schools that are administered by the Catholic Education Office in each diocese).

The aim of Catholic schools is to commit to the development of the whole person — intellectually, physically, spiritually and socially. The curriculum followed is set by the NSW Board of Studies and focuses on the needs of individual students. Emphasis is placed on the quality of the pastoral care. Catholic schools also strive to provide a meaningful, relevant and comprehensive religious education program. Additionally, they encourage parents to participate in the life of their school.

Catholic schools provide educational opportunities for gifted and talented children, children with handicaps (both physical and intellectual) and children with emotional disturbances through a number of Catholic special schools and within the system.

Fees for systemic schools

The fees charged by Catholic systemic schools are relatively low compared with those of independent Catholic schools. This is partly because of the significant financial support provided by both the Commonwealth and state governments. Other sources of funds are school fees, building and subject levies, parish grants and fundraising by Parents & Friends Associations.

Tuition fees for systemic secondary schools in the Archdiocese of Parramatta in 2020 are:

  • Years 7-8 $2190, second child $1644, third child $1095
  • Years 9-10 $2430, second child $1824, third child $1215
  • Years 11-12 $3102, second child $2328, third child $1551

Sydney Catholic Schools Central Office
38 Renwick Street (PO Box 217),
Leichhardt NSW 2040
Phone: 02 9569 6111
Website: sydcatholicschools.nsw.edu.au

Christian Education National schools

Formerly known as Christian Parent Controlled schools, Christian Education National schools are governed by associations of parents and are non-denominational. In Australia, there are more than 80 schools with a total of 23,000 students, most of them catering for Kindergarten to Year 12. Of these, there are 17 schools in NSW, eight of which are in the greater Sydney area. Each school is as varied as the community it serves.

A key feature of each school is the association’s commitment to maintaining a quality education from a Christian perspective, as well as to keeping the cost at a level that ensures the accessibility of the school to all families who would like a Christian education for their children.

Phone the NSW state coordinator on 02 9671 3311, email cen@cen.edu.au or visit cen.edu.au

Adventist schools

There are 48 primary and secondary schools throughout Australia operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, providing Christian education as a service to the community. In NSW, there are nine primary schools and 10 combined primary and secondary schools. Enrolment is open to any student who seeks a positive learning environment with strong Christian values.

All students receive well-balanced academic, physical, social and spiritual development in a caring, well-disciplined environment. The curriculum is constantly reviewed and updated to ensure the needs of all students are well catered for.

Parents are encouraged to become actively involved with trained, professional teachers in a fully accredited, highly resourced facility. A strong pastoral care program provides additional support for students.

School fees are modest when compared with many other independent schools. Special fee assistance programs are available and discounts are provided where more than one child is enrolled. Many schools also offer scholarships.

For more information, visit nnsw.adventist.edu.au

Steiner schools

The Steiner Waldorf educational movement was founded in Germany
by Dr Rudolf Steiner, an Austrian scientist, philosopher and educationalist. Steiner’s educational philosophy focuses on the three developmental phases of childhood: imitation (age zero to seven), imagination (seven to 14) and rational judgment (14 to 21).

Steiner schools facilitate this philosophy in their teaching and use interactive teaching methods that incorporate an experiential and multi-sensory approach to learning. The schools’ curricula focus on the appropriate abilities of children based on their age. They aim to balance academic achievement with the development of physical, artistic and social skills.

All Steiner schools are co-educational and non-denominational and are run by
a college of teachers, not a principal.

Home schooling

Home education, home schooling, “unschooling”, natural learning, home-based learning — however you describe it, home schooling essentially means education by parents. Parents or guardians who are home schooling a child are responsible for developing, implementing and accessing their child’s educational program. Registration with the BOSTES is a legal requirement for home schooling while a child is of compulsory school age and not enrolled at school. In recent years, there has been a marked rise in parents choosing this path.

The reasons parents choose home schooling for their children vary greatly. Some parents may prefer to tailor education programs to the needs, abilities and learning style of their child or to pass on their family’s ethical or religious values through day-to-day education. Some parents may wish to avoid the potential challenges of school-based education, such as bullying and learning in large classes. Many parents of students who are particularly gifted in a certain area will also choose to home educate.

Learning difficulties have also emerged as strong grounds for the decision to home educate. Home education allows students to be educated gently and appropriately by those who have their best interests at heart: their parents.

This can also be a temporary option leading to reintegration back into school
at a later date.

Resources and information

Home schooling is officially legal in Australia, although legislation on home education differs for each state. In NSW, parents must register with the BOSTES as the educator of their child.

For detailed information on the requirements for home schooling, visit boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/home-schooling/index.html and download a detailed home schooling package.

Home Education Association Inc

This association offers information, networks, resources and education guidelines at hea.edu.au

The Home Education Association Courses for Parents in Home Schooling cover how people learn, brain functionality, child development, program writing, resources, research in home schooling, approaches to home schooling, registration and legalities.

TAFE NSW

Almost all secondary schools in NSW offer Vocational Education and Training (VET) as part of their curriculum. VET courses are delivered at school and at TAFE colleges. These courses provide students with access to nationally recognised vocational qualifications, which are part of their HSC pattern of study, and prepare students for employment or a pathway into further education and training.

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Home » School News » “Planting the Seed” for a Lifelong Love of the Outdoors at Xavier College

“Planting the Seed” for a Lifelong Love of the Outdoors at Xavier College


After a significant period of home-learning, Xavier College is committed to ensuring all students can engage closely and respectfully with natural environments and global cultures. It is more important than ever for students to immerse themselves in the world around them.

Expedition programs at the college aim to put meaningful purpose at the heart of learning. Over the first Semester of 2021, students braved the pristine Mornington Peninsula waters to swim with seals, journeyed along Anglesea’s rugged coastline, canoed along Warrandyte’s bending Birrarung (Yarra River) and much, much more. These day expeditions are centred around “growth” and “exploration” frameworks, aimed at fostering positive wellbeing and personal development. The program provides opportunities for students to engage with nature, challenge themselves and build relationships with their peers.

In the Junior Schools, students embrace Outdoor Education camps in country and rural Victoria where they participate in activities such as canoeing, bushwalking, high ropes courses and confidence building exercises. Many senior students travel overseas for activities associated with music, sport, service and global engagement. In recent years, Xavier College supported a Wind Ensemble tour in the UK, an Athletics tour in Europe, a Water Polo tour in the US and a World Challenge trip to Peru, as well as annual overseas Immersion trips to assist marginalised communities. Closer to home, students travel to Indigenous communities to learn more about the history and culture of our land, centring on Indigenous perspectives. In working to pursue critically a depth of learning, students are taught to first reflect on these experiences, then move to action. Border closures have unfortunately put a pause on a number of these opportunities, but students are looking towards many of these exciting trips in the future. In the meantime, various “retreats” and “gauntlet” getaways allow senior students to reflect in natural environments about their position in the world around them.

The college’s Outdoor Education also incorporates numerous on-campus projects to bring in the natural world while providing outdoor learning opportunities. Gardening projects are sprouting on the Junior and Senior campuses, and provide the context for climate change education.

To learn more about the Expeditions program, visit the Xavier College website: https://www.xavier.vic.edu.au/our-programs/our-expeditions

Publish By
Religion Catholic
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls
Years Year 1 - Year 12
Enrolment Xavier College has approximately 1800 students across our Co-educational (Prep – Year 4) and Boys (Years 5 – 12) programs. Campuses are in Brighton (Kostka Hall) and Kew (Burke Hall and the Senior Campus).
Fees Fees range from $21,000 to $33,000 depending on Year level. More information: https://www.xavier.vic.edu.au/2021-fee-schedule
Phone
Senior ******* Senior Campus: (03) 9854 5411 ; Kostka Hall: (03) 9519 0600 ; Burke Hall: (03) 9855 4100
Address 135 Barkers Road, Kew VIC 3101
Email
enquiri*******
enquiries@xavier.vic.edu.au
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Home » Education Advice » Four tips to finance your child’s quality education

Four tips to finance your child’s quality education


 

We all want to do the best by our children and send them to the best school possible.

One that meets their individual needs, aligns with our own values, and provides activities that nourishes your child’s aspirations can often seem like looking for a diamond in the rough – and that diamond, unfortunately, can cost quite a lot.

Though some of us may be fortunate to live in an applicable public school catchment area, where school fees are relatively affordable compared with top-tier private schools, for many, sending children to a desirable school will cost a significant amount in terms of school fees.

How can you get ahead of the expenses? We have four ways to make sure you can get the funds you need for your children’s education.

Start early: establish a long-term savings account

If you’re considering kids – or maybe your kids are still crawling around – it pays to establish a long-term savings account or long-term term deposit to ensure you have the funds when your children reach school age. You may also want to defer private school education until your child reaches high school – which gives you another seven years to save for the school of your choice.

Buy in a school catchment zone

Quality schools aren’t necessarily all privately run. Mount Barker South Primary School in South Australia changed its culture in 2010 and enrolments surged to over 1000 in 2018, which is remarkable for a school that usually has under 200 students at any given time. If you buy in a school catchment zone, this guarantees a place for your child at that high-performing public school; families outside the zone are put onto waiting lists.

Consider a student loan

One way to finance private education is through a student loan. These types of loans are not tied to an asset, like a car loan is tied to a car. Parents or caregivers may choose to take out a personal student loan on behalf of students under the age of 18. If you are over 18 and a parent of a student and earning some form of income, you may be eligible for a specialised student loan.

Bill Tsouvalas, managing director of Savvy, and loan expert says these loans can be flexible to pay for tuition fees, textbooks, or living expenses, if your school of choice is a boarding school.

“Depending on your income and your financial standing, you can borrow from $2000 all the way up to $100,000,” he says. “Most personal loan terms stretch out over five years, so you can spread the payments over that time. You may be able to extend the terms to suit also. Student loans can also have a fixed interest rate, so you know exactly how much each repayment will be in advance.”

Some student loans (subject to fulfilling eligibility criteria) may come with additional features to help you with expenses throughout the term of the loan.

One feature is a redraw facility. This means you can withdraw funds from the loan to pay for sudden expenses such as excursions or activity days. Another similar feature are top-ups. A top-up adds additional funds to the loan for you to spend on whatever education expense you choose.

Live in a cheaper suburb and use the savings on education

Though your child will have to commute a little longer, another option is to buy into a cheaper suburb and use the savings to put toward private education. With private schools accepting students from all over instead of being bound to strict government school catchment zones, you can live further away from the school itself and save money on rent or mortgage repayments which you can then put toward education.

Starting early, taking out finance, or using creative options such as buying in certain zones can ensure your child has the best chance at receiving a quality education.

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Home » School News » Barker Robotics on the World Stage

Barker Robotics on the World Stage


It has been an incredibly successful competition season for Barker College’s robotics students, with a string of titles being awarded to both the VEX and FIRST teams.

The VEX Robotics Competition is the largest Robotics Competition in the world, with more than 20,000 teams. This year, Barker had three teams qualify to VEX Worlds; two from the Middle School in the VEX Robotics Competition and one from the Junior School for the VEX IQ Challenge.

The final result saw Barker’s 4613W – HyperSphere – win the Middle School Technology B Division, the Overall Technology division, and be named semi-finalists for the Overall VEX Worlds Championship – an incredible achievement to place them in the top eight teams in the world.

Barker’s Senior FIRST Robotics Competition team, the Barker Redbacks, has placed 6th globally on raw competition scores. They were also awarded the Chairman’s award for the school’s ongoing outreach and support of the community including establishing robotics at Barker’s Indigenous campus, Darkinjung Barker, and the establishment and continuing to support of the Springbots, the first FRC team in South Africa. The team also won the Engineering Excellence award for the quality of the design, construction and engineering process of the robot.

Year 11 student, Suzanne Brian won nomination as a Dean’s List Award winner. She will now compete at FRC Championships level as a Dean’s List Finalist. This is now the fourth Dean’s List Finalist that the school has had recognised since 2015.

For more information

Barker College

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Religion Anglican
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment Students from Pre-Kindergarten to Year 12 including 60 Year 10 – 12 boarders.
Fees Over 16k
Tuition from $25,000
Phone
8438 79******* 8438 7999
Fax
8438 76******* 8438 7609
Address 91 Pacific Highway, Hornsby NSW 2077
Email
enrolme*******
enrolments@barker.nsw.edu.au
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Home » School News » Does Choosing a Strathcona Education for your Daughter Provide an Additional Advantage?

Does Choosing a Strathcona Education for your Daughter Provide an Additional Advantage?


School is important, but which school is also important. What is the part of a school in student results? This is an important question, especially for parents investing considerable financial resources in sending their daughters to a school like Strathcona.

Each year it is very exciting to see the VCE results that Strathcona students achieve. With last year being so unusual with its (un)fair share of challenges there was more uncertainty about how the students would perform than usual. With conditions different to those we had been used to with lockdowns, modified study designs and assessment practices, there was the possibility that we would be surprised, and not in a good way. However, as you would be aware, our students did not fail to deliver.

What is the part of a school in student results? This is an important question, especially for parents investing considerable financial resources in sending their daughters to a school like Strathcona. It is a question I was challenged with by my neighbour soon after the results came through. When he asked how we went, I replied “we did very well”. With a cheeky grin he asked, “you or your students?” Tactfully I replied “that they were the students’ results, but it is very good for us that they did well.”

There is no question that our VCE results being ranked ninth in the state in terms of Study Scores by the newspapers helps the school’s reputation. However, principal Marise McConaghy and I wanted to explore the question of how Strathcona helps the students achieve what they do. We often call this ‘Value Add’. After all, our students come with many advantages over the average Victorian student. Does the School provide an additional advantage?

The VCE results come from the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA), the administrative body for the VCE, with a prediction of how each student will go in each subject. This prediction is made based on student performance on the GAT, the General Achievement Test, a three hour examination that every student undertaking a Unit 3/4 subject sits, usually in June, but in 2020 in October. This test assesses three areas that are statistically correlated with achievement in every subject: written communication; mathematics, science and technology; humanities, the arts and social sciences. The GAT serves several purposes including providing schools with an indication of how scores for each subject compared with the expectations given the students in the subject. These results do point to significant gains for many of our students, but the test is taken so close to the final examinations, indeed after some of the assessment has taken place. Are the student GAT scores higher than they would otherwise be if they had not already spent years of their schooling at Strathcona?

Stratchcona-1

I dug deeper. Each student is tested on entry to the Strathcona Senior School using Edutest. This test provides percentile rankings against the broader population on verbal IQ and numerical IQ, achievement in reading comprehension and achievement in Mathematics. In Year 7 we also test students using PAT (Progressive Achievement Tests), which give percentile rankings in Reading, Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation and Mathematics. Using these benchmarks, we find that Strathcona students are above average in terms of potential and achievement in Year 7. However, the distribution is much broader and the average much lower than that achieved in the ATAR, another percentile rank that correlates strongly with performance in numeracy and literacy. To make this statement more concrete, those of our Year 7 students who perform at or below the national and school average in Years 6 and 7 very often achieve ATARs in the 80s and 90s. Fifty-seven per cent of our students achieved an ATAR of over 90 in 2020. By contrast, only 12 per cent of these students achieved an Edutest ranking in the top 10 per cent of the population when in Year 6.

Strathcona does make a big difference for its students. This difference is revealed in the VCE statistics, but it is also evident in their broader successes. There are differences in resources, and focus. The rich, supportive community is so strong at Strathcona and not just about examination preparation but nurturing of human beings, learners, who are respected and empowered. It is a community of students, teachers and other staff, parents, and past students who band together to provide the unique experience that is a Strathcona education. It is not infallible, and it certainly requires the students to work hard. Some students for whatever reason take greater advantage of the opportunities available to them in their learning and reap the rewards.

I have heard many speakers in my life, and one whose words I will never forget is Reverend Tim Costello. On a visit to Strathcona perhaps a decade ago he told students and staff about how people often dream of what they would do if they won the lottery. “By being born in a place like Australia, you have already won the lottery. So, what are you going to do?” he challenged us. Most of us have been born into privilege and as parents we have done all we can to provide the best opportunities for our children. A very significant part of that work as parents is to send our daughters to Strathcona. Different students will benefit in different ways and take up different opportunities at school. Some will achieve amazing VCE results, some will perform on stage, on the sporting field or contribute wonderful service to the community. Some even manage all of the above.

We are thrilled with the achievements of our students and the contributions we have been able to make to their lives. We also look forward to the vast diversity of outstanding contributions, grand and humble, that they will go on to make in their lives and Strathcona are proud to play a part in making that happen.

Mr Ross Phillips

Senior Dean of Learning Futures

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Religion None
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 820 students.
Fees 8k - 12k 12k - 16k
From $10,416 (ELC) to $30,980 (Year 12) per annum.
Phone
03 8779******* 03 8779 7500
Address 34 Scott Street, Canterbury 3126
Email
registr*******
registrar@strathcona.vic.edu.au
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Home » School News » Join De Le Salle College for a Tour

Join De Le Salle College for a Tour


 

When considering a school for your child, a College tour provides a unique opportunity to see the school in action and to experience the learning environment first hand.

Monthly tours are led by current students and members of our leadership team and include a presentation by our Principal, Peter Houlihan. Families have the opportunity to view both our Tiverton and Kinnoull Campus’ and hear about the wide range of opportunities available at De La Salle College.

De La Salle College continues to follow the advice of the Victorian Chief Health Officer and maintains best COVID-19 safety practices. To ensure everyone has an opportunity to experience De La Salle College, join us on a Virtual Tour of all three campuses or watch our four information videos which give you a deeper insight into our College and our community.

Join us for a College tour or visit www.delasalle.vic.edu.au to find out why the College is the right choice for your son.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the Admission Team via email enrolment@delasalle.vic.edu.au

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Religion Catholic
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Boy
Years Year 5 - Year 12
Enrolment 1,100 from Years 5 to 12.
Fees Annual tuition fees range from : $9,500 - $12,500
Phone
03 9508******* 03 9508 2100
Address 1318 High Street, Malvern 3144
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enrolme*******
enrolment@delasalle.vic.edu.au
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Home » School News » First in Engineering at Da Vinci Decathlon

First in Engineering at Da Vinci Decathlon


Meriden’s Year 7 students have taken out the Engineering category at the 2021 Da Vinci Decathlon. The win puts the girls ahead of the best and brightest from more than eighty schools across New South Wales.

Heidi Bartlett, Vinudhi Silva and Keira Wakes made up the Year 7 Engineering dream team. They were tasked with designing and constructing a scale model of a mini-golf course that incorporated the concept of chance, with “chance” being the overarching theme of this year’s event.  The girls built their model using paper, cardboard, straws and plasticine and designed it to incorporate a system of tunnels hidden along a ramp, making the possibility of achieving a high score a matter of both chance and skill.

Dr Phoebe Poon, Coordinator of Learning Link – Gifted and Talented, said the girls’ performance speaks to their solid foundations in STEM disciplines and Lateral Learning principles.

“The Engineering task was particularly challenging as it required lateral thinking and collaborative problem-solving,” Dr Poon said.

“The outstanding success of our girls in Engineering can be attributed to their hard work and enthusiasm for innovation, together with the many hours they spent engaging with STEM technologies and concepts to develop important skills.”

To prepare for the decathlon’s Engineering component, the team practised building different types of models that were both functional and strong, deliberately limiting their access to resources to increase the level of challenge and experimentation.

Keira said, despite the broad nature of their preparation, the task they received on the day was a surprise. “We weren’t expecting to build a mini-golf course!” she said.

“The biggest challenge was figuring out a design that met the brief but we brainstormed together and then divides the tasks according to our strengths. When constructing the course, it was crucial that we balanced the weight of the ball with the strength of our ramp to stop the course from collapsing. To incorporate the chance element, we made the tubing the same size as the ball and ensured the ball rolled through the course smoothly,” Keira said.

Vinudhi and Heidi agreed that the collaborative nature of their group was one of the greatest assets and was also what made the Da Vinci Decathlon a fun, interesting event.

The renowned decathlon is open to students from Year 5 to Year 11 and tasks are designed to extend students’ higher-order thinking skills, problem-solving abilities and creativity. Teams complete across ten disciplines: Engineering, Mathematics and Chess, Code Breaking, Art and Poetry, Science, English, IDeation, Creative Producers, Cartography and Legacy.

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Religion Anglican
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 1,500 students
Fees Over 16k
$19,950 (Kindergarten) - $33,240 (Year 12)
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(61 2) ******* (61 2) 9752 9444
Address 3 Margaret Street, Strathfield NSW 2135
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Home » Education Advice » Making the Transition from Primary to Secondary School

Making the Transition from Primary to Secondary School


Your child’s move from primary to secondary school is a time of change — not just for the student, who may be more excited than anxious, but also for the parents, who may feel uneasy and concerned about what lies ahead.

As a parent, you can play a huge role in how your child manages the transition from primary to secondary school. However, it is important that you keep any feelings of anxiety to yourself; you want to encourage eagerness and excitement. This transition is a milestone for your child. They are growing and learning and are capable of new challenges and experiences. It is important to focus on that and to use positive language when discussing the move. If they consider starting secondary school as an exciting experience rather than a fearful one, they are likely to find those early weeks far less stressful.

One of the biggest changes for you and your child is the lack of familiarity with the new school surroundings, pupils, teachers and procedures. Coming from a classroom of about 30 students they have probably known for years to an environment with 200 or more students in their year can be disconcerting. Feelings of anonymity can be common as your child goes from being a big fish (Year 6) in a small pond to a small fish (Year 7) in a big pond.

Added to this is the new concept of having several teachers, changing classrooms from lesson to lesson, getting to know the timetable and where they have to be and when. There may also be new transport methods, new pick-up points, new bus timetables and more.

Feelings of nervousness and apprehension are very natural. However, there are many ways you can make all of this easier. First, work with your school. They may already be working with the secondary school and have a transition program in place. The new school may send students or teachers to talk to the primary school students. They will probably also have orientation days arranged where your child will be shown around their new high school.

Students in government secondary schools all participate in an orientation day. All government schools hold orientation on the same day — often the second Tuesday of December. The orientation day may include a school tour, meeting fellow students and teachers, and taking part in special lessons and activities.

Don’t hesitate to communicate directly to the new school, too. They may be happy for you to visit with your child on a second occasion, to walk unguided through the school and work out what is where. They may also have a buddy system in place where they will appoint a more senior student, who is confident and familiar around the school, to help your child during the early days of their enrolment. They will be able to meet face-to-face or chat by email and can be a reassuring contact in a new environment.

Planning ahead can also build familiarity and confidence. On orientation day, take photos on your phone of where your child needs to go for certain classes. Sit down and discuss the new timetable and how it works. Laminate a copy for your child and keep one for yourself so you can run through it with them each evening and check that they have what they need in their bag for the next day. Find out if any friends of the family who your child is familiar with go to the school. Ring them and arrange to reacquaint them with your child before the start of the new school year. This will provide a ready-made support system. If necessary, do a trial run of new transport arrangements so your child knows what bus or train to catch, where and at what time.

Greater academic demands may also be worrying for your child as there is a perceived increase in competitiveness in secondary school. Putting some time aside each evening to help your child establish good study habits during the first few weeks and months will pay off as demands increase in later years. Now is also the time to begin establishing a good working relationship with your child’s teachers. You may also want to get involved with the school’s Parents and Citizens Association.

High school is also a period of great social change for your child, so it’s really important to keep the lines of communication open. Encourage your child to talk about their friends and help them establish or strengthen friendships and to resolve issues. Try organising out-of-school social get-togethers and outings. Invite friends to the house or organise to go to the park or the movies, so that you get to know your child’s friends. Above all, remember that your child’s journey to secondary school is a vital and natural part of their growing up.

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Home » School News » Tennis Turns Eight at The McDonald College

Tennis Turns Eight at The McDonald College


The McDonald College has had a thriving Tennis stream for eight years.

Across the Junior and Senior schools, 30 students train each day on the courts at Sydney Olympic Park under the careful eye of Voyager Tennis Academy coaches. Sometimes they train twice a day.

Voyager’s co-founder Luke Bourgeois adheres to the view that talented tennis players should not give up their education to pursue their sporting dreams. Nor should they have to give up their sport to pursue their education. “In our partnership with The McDonald College they can excel at both,” he says. “It’s the 10,000 hours theory. You can have all the talent in the world but it won’t flourish without investing time on the court.”

Luke is careful about who he will admit into Voyager. The ultimate – but not the only – pathway for his students is the US College circuit.

He is the youngest of eight children and a graduate of St Aloysius College, he first picked up a racquet aged four and played his way up to being a national champion at the age of 17. He was mentored by Australian champion Tony Roche, and as he began doing well at international tournaments, he received offers from US Colleges.

He was advised to hit the professional circuit and so he knocked back offers from Harvard, among others. His career on the circuit flourished and in his 20s he settled in Florida. From his base in the US he managed wins over some of the biggest names in tennis, Andy Murray, David Ferrer and the Bryan brothers.

He travelled as part of Roger Federer’s team for three years but at 30 he was ready to come home and over time, he has come to the conclusion he should have gone the College route after all.

“It gives you four more years of nurturing, not to mention an academic back-up,” he says.

This is the advice he gives his students and so far he has a 100 per cent success rate of Voyager full time students securing a place in a US College if they want one.

“There are 18 so far, and counting” he says.

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 300 students
Fees on application. sibling discounts available.
Phone
02 9752******* 02 9752 0500
Fax
02 8765******* 02 8765 0195
Address 17 George Street, North Strathfield, 2137
Email
registr*******
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