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Leaders in Learning Excellence


With COVIDSafe measures in place, Caroline Chisholm Catholic College is excited to welcome back the community and prospective families to its 2021 Open Day, to be held Sunday, 23 May.

Taking a peek behind the front doors, families will step into a world of opportunities open to students across its three campuses. Learning Areas will be on display with dedicated and enthusiastic staff ready to answer questions and demonstrate their expertise. Attendees will be able to take part in a range of activities from science experiments to cooking demonstrations. The Performing Arts department of the College is welcoming back live performance with Footloose as the musical for 2021.

Open Day will allow visitors to see the exceptional talent at Caroline Chisholm Catholic College, and the range of subject areas available to students. “We want prospective families to come and discover, meet, experience and explore the college, and learn what makes us a leader in learning excellence”, says Principal Robert Brennan.

A Holistic Approach

The infrastructure of Caroline Chisholm Catholic College is designed specifically for the holistic development of its students and provides modern and flexible facilities. The new science wing at the Christ the King campus was completed and ready for the 2021 school year. The modern wing includes two new science labs, along with flexible indoor and outdoor learning areas. The Science Wing was designed by award-winning Melbourne based architects Branch Studios and incorporates the life cycle of cells in its design.

The college also has a new performing and visual arts building, St Madeleines Arts Centre, which houses music, drama, dance, and other subjects. Students at each of the three campuses have access to modern and well-equiped libraries, with a range of break out spaces for use by students in and out of class. With a vision to continually improve and keep up to date, the college offers modern classrooms with access to data projectors, as well as a number of specialised classrooms for art and technology subjects.

The senior students of Sacred Heart have access to a Senior Study Centre, which offers a space dedicated to the study needs of the senior students. It includes a kitchenette and outdoor garden, giving them an area to enjoy their food, take a brain break, and offer them a rewarding and dedicated area, promoting their independence and freedom to go along with their responsibilities as senior members of the college.

To find out more of what Caroline Chisholm Catholic College has to offer, visit www.cccc.vic.edu.au and come along to the Open Day.

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Religion Catholic
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Enrolment 1500 students
Phone
03 9296******* 03 9296 5311
Address 65 and 204 Churchill Avenue, Braybrook 3019
Email
communi*******
communications@cccc.vic.edu.au
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Home » Education Advice » Education 2020/2021: The Big Picture

Education 2020/2021: The Big Picture


Education regularly undergoes changes, so it’s important to have a thorough understanding of the current educational curriculum, policy and teaching methods when choosing a school for your child. Here’s an overview of what to expect from your child’s years of schooling.

Australian curriculum
The national curriculum is produced by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) in consultation with educators. The Australian curriculum sets out the core knowledge, understanding, skills and general capabilities important for all Australian students. It describes the learning entitlement of students as a foundation for their future growth and makes clear what young Australians should learn as they progress through their school years. It is also the foundation for the high-quality teaching required to meet the needs of Australian students.

ACARA developed the Australian curriculum in consultation with states and territories. Education authorities in each state and territory have responsibility for implementation of the Australian curriculum and for supporting schools and teachers.
Changes in 2014 ensure that new Kindergarten to Year 10 syllabuses for English, Mathematics, Science and History are taught in NSW schools. These syllabuses incorporate Australian curriculum content.

School-leaving age
In May 2009, a law was passed that increased the school-leaving age from 15 to 17. This law became effective on January 1, 2010, and applies to government, independent and private schooling as well as home schooling. The change was made in response to research that shows children who leave school later are more likely to become employed, earn higher wages and enjoy a better quality of life. The new law applies to children who are younger than 15 on January 1, 2010, and also to students aged between 15 and 17 who completed Year 10 in 2009 or who were registered for home schooling in 2009.

Now that participation is compulsory up to age 17, students must continue to stay at school beyond their Year 10 studies and participate in further education pathways that are approved by the NSW Department of Education or be registered for home schooling. Approved pathways include the Higher School Certificate, TAFE vocational training courses, full-time paid employment or a combination of further education and paid employment.

From Kindergarten to Year 12
A student who has completed Kindergarten to Year 12 will have spent close to 15,000 hours in the education system. Their journey begins in Kindergarten before they are placed in primary school, where children complete seven years of primary education. Students leave primary school when they have completed Year 6 and move on to high school to begin Year 7.
Virtually all students continue their education up to the point when they are first eligible for a Record of School Achievement (normally at around 16 years of age). Most students then go on to complete the Higher School Certificate.

Many HSC graduates further their studies at a tertiary institution, such as a TAFE or university. NSW schools provide a variety of education pathways for students between the time they first become eligible for a Record of School Achievement (RoSA) and when they leave school.

After primary school, there’s a wide selection of secondary schools to which you can apply. The choices include both government and non-government schools or registered home schooling. All children are guaranteed a place in their local government primary and/or high school, but within the government sector you may also choose to apply to a non-local primary or high school, a selective school or a specialised school. This means parents have the opportunity to send their child to a school that best fits their child’s individual needs and abilities.

Special needs
Under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and the Disability Standards for Education 2005, students with disabilities can participate in education on the same basis as other students.
The aim of educational authorities in NSW is to ensure that no student misses out. Hospital schools, community care schools, schools for a specific purpose and schools for deaf and blind children ensure education is available to all students regardless of their educational and physical needs.

Students can access the curriculum in a variety of ways, which may include adjustments to teaching, learning and/or assessment activities. For a small percentage of students with special education needs, particularly those with an intellectual disability, a decision may be made to access Life Skills outcomes and content in one or more subjects. Life Skills courses contribute to a student’s pattern of study for the HSC but do not contribute towards an ATAR.

All decisions regarding curriculum options for students with special education needs should be made in the context of collaborative curriculum planning and include the student and parent/carer.

Students Learning an Additional Language or Dialect (ELA/D)
Many students in Australian schools are learning English as an additional language or dialect (EAL/D). EAL/D learners are students whose first language is a language other than Standard Australian English and who require additional support to help them develop English-language proficiency.

EAL/D students come from diverse backgrounds and may include:

  • Overseas- and Australian-born children whose first language is a language
  • other than English
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students whose first language is an Indigenous language, including traditional languages
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students whose first language is Aboriginal English, including creoles and related varieties.

EAL/D learners enter Australian schools at different ages and stages of schooling and at different stages of English-language learning. They have diverse talents and capabilities and a range of prior learning experiences and levels of literacy in their first language and in English. EAL/D students represent a significant and growing percentage of learners in NSW schools.

Distance education
If you live in a remote part of the state, government education is available through resources such as Distance Education Centres. These are located throughout NSW and provide isolated students with a teaching and learning program supplemented with experiences such as satellite lessons and field visits. For those primary and secondary schools in geographically isolated areas that are educationally disadvantaged by their location, Commonwealth funding is provided by the NSW Country Areas Program (CAP). CAP is designed to assist schools and their communities to enhance the learning outcomes and educational opportunities for students in geographically isolated areas.

The early years of schooling
Pre-schools
The NSW government operates 100 pre-schools across NSW and many private pre-schools operate across communities. Pre-schools provide educational programs for your child prior to enrolment in Kindergarten.

Kindergarten is the initial year of schooling in NSW. Children who enter Kindergarten in NSW must turn five by 31 July in the year in which they are enrolled. When starting Kindergarten, students in government schools undertake a Best Start Assessment that helps teachers identify the literacy and numeracy skills of the student and enables the teacher to develop learning programs accordingly.

The purpose of the seven years spent in primary school is to promote the development of individual students as well as to lay the basic educational foundations for their effective participation in society. With this objective, primary school teachers provide learning experiences that engage students in a wide variety of interesting and meaningful activities. These enhance the quality of school life and prepare students to respond creatively and effectively to the challenges of our rapidly changing society.

All NSW government primary schools are co-educational. Gifted and talented children may also be eligible for early entry to Kindergarten. If considering this as an option, organise an appointment with your chosen school where your child will be reviewed by the school in consultation with yourself.

Curriculum
The seven years of primary schooling are divided into Stages of Learning. Early Stage 1 is Kindergarten, Stage 1 — Years 1 and 2, Stage 2 — Years 3 and 4, and Stage 3 — Years 5 and 6. Reflected in the curriculum is an awareness of the central importance of basic skills for all children, including literacy and numeracy, reasoning and information processing, communicating and creative and imaginative thinking.

The Key Learning Areas (KLAs) in the primary years of schooling are: English; Mathematics; Science and Technology; Human Society and its Environment (HSIE); Creative Arts; and Personal Development, Health and Physical Education (PDHPE). Each of the KLAs has learning outcomes for students that are used by teachers to develop their teaching and learning programs.

National Assessment Program
In 2008, the National Assessment Program — Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) was introduced for all students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9. The purpose of the program is to assess the literacy and numeracy learning of students in all Australian schools.

The results of these tests will provide information for teachers and parents and help inform teachers in their ongoing efforts to address the literacy and numeracy needs of their students. It is designed to provide information on student performance across a number of achievement levels.

Secondary schooling
Secondary schooling commences at Year 7 level and is compulsory for all NSW students aged younger than 17, unless students are registered for home schooling. In Years 7 and 9, students sit the NAPLAN test, which is designed to assess students’ literacy and numeracy skills.

In Year 8, all students in NSW government schools sit for the Essential Secondary Science Assessment (ESSA), which is designed to test students’ knowledge, skills and attitudes towards science. It is optional but not compulsory for non-government schools to register for the ESSA test.

From the end of Year 10, students who have fulfilled their course requirements are eligible for the NSW RoSA. The RoSA is cumulative, meaning it records achievements and participation in senior secondary study up to the point that a student leaves school, and records A to E grades based on school-based assessment. Students leaving school also have the option of taking online literacy and numeracy tests.

Higher School Certificate
Most students choose to continue their studies to attain the Higher School Certificate (HSC). On successful completion of all course requirements, including assessments and exams, students participating in the HSC will receive a result for each HSC course. This information is used by the Universities Admissions Centre to derive the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR), which is used to determine entry into university courses. This is the common name given to all existing selection indices in Australian states and territories (excluding Queensland).

The highest ATAR attainable is 99.95. This score would indicate the student is in the top 0.05 percentile of students in Australia. As well as the ATAR, students who participate in the HSC receive an HSC Course Report for each general education course they complete. This report describes their level of achievement as well as the standards reached by other students in the course. A “minimum standard expected” has been set for each course, which corresponds to a mark of 50 out of 100. Students who reach or exceed the minimum standard for each course will score between 50 and 100.

Each HSC Course Report for a general education course shows a student’s mark in relation to six performance bands, the highest of which is band 6 (between 90 and 100). These bands clearly describe what students know and can do at each level of achievement.

Student results in the HSC are based equally on both statewide examinations and school-based assessment. School assessments are adjusted to ensure results from all schools across the state can be fairly compared. Schools are not allowed to reveal to students the final school assessment submitted to the Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW because of this adjustment process, but they do inform students of their ranking within each course after the examinations have finished.

In addition to a wide range of general education courses, HSC students are also able to select from vocational education and training (VET) courses. These can be part of the students’ HSC curriculum and enable students to gain both HSC qualifications and Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) accreditation.

Diversity and choice
Students have greater options in their choice of high school than ever before. There is a wide diversity of high schools within NSW: technology high schools; selective high schools and comprehensive high schools with selective streams; language high schools; single-gender high schools; agricultural high schools; sports high schools; performing arts high schools; creative arts high schools; multi-campus colleges; and senior high schools. These are all in addition to comprehensive high schools, which remain the backbone of the secondary schooling system.
All students are guaranteed a place in their local government high school. However, entry into non-local schools is subject to available accommodation. This should be kept in mind if you want to apply to a school outside your designated local area.

Teachers
There are more than 2200 government schools in NSW, which employ more than 80,000 teachers, all of whom are highly trained and skilled. Most teachers in government and non-government schools have completed three or more years of training at a higher-education institution. Many teachers have also completed further studies and hold post-graduate qualifications. Additionally, teachers regularly attend professional learning programs developed by the Department of Education and Communities and other organisations.

The implementation of the Teacher Accreditation Act (2004) ensures that all teachers who commenced teaching after October 1, 2004, must achieve accreditation with the NSW Education Standards Authority. This requires them to demonstrate effective practice as described in the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. These standards are also applied to mandatory participation by teachers in continuing professional development.

The Education Act 1990
The Education Act of 1990 established the framework for school education in NSW. Under the act, students from Kindergarten to Year 10 are required to study a range of subjects organised in what are termed “Key Learning Areas” (KLAs).
There are six Key Learning Areas for Kindergarten to Year 6:

  • English
  • Mathematics
  • Science and Technology
  • Human Society and Its Environment
  • Creative Arts
  • Personal Development, Health and Physical Education

There are eight Key Learning Areas for Years 7 to 10:

  • English
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE)
  • Personal Development, Health and Physical Education (PDHPE)
  • Creative and Performing Arts (CAPA)
  • Technology and Applied Studies (TAS)
  • Languages

Each subject has a detailed syllabus document developed that outlines the course of study and the learning outcomes to be achieved

Eligibility for awards
Students will need to have completed the mandatory requirements for Stage 5 (Year 10) to be eligible for a RoSA. Those eligible students who choose to leave school prior to receiving their HSC may receive a RoSA.

Students will be required to submit assessment tasks as delivered by their schools, which will then use marks from those assessments to allocate a grade for each student. Teachers will submit those grades for inclusion on the RoSA if required. Students may also undertake optional numeracy and literacy exams online.

There are two stages of the Higher School Certificate that candidates must complete, referred to as “patterns of study”. The Preliminary pattern of study comprises a minimum of 12 units (each subject is worth a certain number of units) and the HSC pattern of study comprises at least 10 units. Both patterns must include a minimum of six units of Board-developed courses and at least two units of a Board-developed course in English. At least three courses must be of two-unit value or greater (either Board-developed or Board-endorsed). Both patterns of study must include at least four subjects. To satisfy pattern of study requirements for the HSC, a student may count a maximum of six Preliminary units and six HSC units from courses in science.

Apart from Board-developed courses, students can also study courses developed by their school. These school-developed courses are known as Board-endorsed courses and can be included among the courses that count towards the HSC. Additionally, the Board has made some exemplary Board-endorsed courses available to all schools. These are known as content-endorsed courses.

HSC students can also combine study of traditional academic subjects with courses that provide vocational training. A number of TAFE courses are recognised for the HSC and students who successfully complete these courses will receive credentials from TAFE as well as a listing of the courses on their Higher School Certificate Record of Achievement. There are also eight dual-accredited vocational courses that are recognised by industry and also count towards the award of the HSC.

Courses for the HSC can be accumulated over up to five calendar years from the year in which a course examination is first attempted. Students who wish to balance study with work, family commitments or other interests can use this option to design a study program and complete the HSC in a way that suits their needs.

School councils
Under the 1990 Education Act legislation, school councils were developed as an option for school communities seeking to increase relevant community participation in the policy making of local schools.

School councils provide a focus for school community activity. They comprise parents, staff and community members. Where established, these councils set policies and goals for their schools including directions for the future based on the needs of the local community. The councils combine the efforts of parents, staff and the community in a genuine partnership to promote quality school-based decisions.

Student welfare
Schools are interested in more than academic instruction; there’s also concern for the welfare of their students and their overall development.

Good discipline
Student discipline in government schools is one section of the Department of Education and Communities’ student welfare policy. The emphasis of this policy is on good discipline — the development and care of the whole student as opposed to modifying behaviour under the threat of punishment. Such positive school programs do not replace or undermine firm discipline policies but aim to deal with the causes of any problems.

The Student Discipline in Government Schools policy states that all government schools must have an individual school discipline policy. This policy is to be developed in consultation with school community members.

It has four areas of focus:

  • School rules or discipline code
  • Strategies to promote positive student behaviour
  • Ways to recognise and reward student achievement
  • Strategies for dealing with unacceptable behaviour

All parents and students have access to a copy of the school’s discipline policy, including the school’s homework policy and dress code, if desired. This is regularly updated by the school.

School non-attendance
Every student who is enrolled at a school, regardless of their age, is required to attend on every school day. It is the parents’ legal responsibility to ensure regular attendance. Rolls are marked every day. Students who have been sick or absent need to provide a note from their parents within seven days. Schools will inform parents of any cases of truancy or unexplained absences.
In l986, the government initiated the Home School Liaison Program (HSLP) to consult with teachers and principals at schools and provide support to parents. The program’s officers form an essential link between the home and the school as they are specifically trained to work with families, staff and students to improve student attendance. Home School Liaison officers can be contacted through the school principal or your closest regional office.

Student leadership and student representative councils
The school community is an excellent training ground for the development of student leadership skills. Student leadership programs assist in developing skills in young people, with one of the best-known initiatives being the Student Representative Council (SRC). All secondary schools have an SRC and primary schools are also beginning to establish them. It consists of student leaders from each year who have been elected by their fellow students. They have the task of representing the interests of their peers to the school, staff and parent and community groups. SRC members participate in school planning and decision-making and initiate projects within the school as well as organise ways for other students to participate in school life. Some high schools have a prefect body as well as an SRC. In most cases, these high-profile student leaders within a school have come through the ranks of the school’s SRC structure.

The secondary school student leadership network extends to inter-school and regional SRCs and a state body known as the New South Wales Student Representative Council (NSW SRC). This forum of 22 student leaders, including two Aboriginal students, is also peer-elected. It is consulted by senior officers in the Department of Education and Communities, other government departments and business and community groups.

The other state body of peer-elected student leaders is the State SRC Conference Working Party. This group plans and conducts an annual State SRC Conference with regional SRC participants from across NSW. The annual conference deals with student welfare themes of interest to young people. As a result of the conference, information and action-planning flow to
the NSW SRC, regional, inter-school and school SRC forums.

Such conferences reflect the fact that SRCs are increasingly involved in student welfare programs such as peer mediation and conflict resolution, drug education, health and safety, student leaders on teacher committees, Aboriginal student leadership, anti-discrimination and anti-racism.

These activities provide opportunities for the development of student leadership skills that will not only assist school organisation and planning, but will also be beneficial for the students in many areas of their life in the future.

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Home » Education Advice » Understanding the RoSA, HSC and IB: A Concise Guide

Understanding the RoSA, HSC and IB: A Concise Guide


Today’s Higher School Certificate (HSC) offers more than 110 courses, including a range of nationally accredited Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses.

Depending on subject choice, NSW students can graduate with a Higher School Certificate, a nationally recognised VET qualification, credit transfer into TAFE NSW courses and/or an Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR).

The Higher School Certificate (HSC)
The HSC is an internationally recognised qualification for students who have successfully completed secondary education in NSW. The HSC is flexible and accessible to all students. There’s a wide variety of subjects to choose from for the HSC.

The syllabuses make it clear to everyone what students are expected to learn and be able to do in each course by the end of Year 12. Sample examination questions and marking guidelines help students set goals and understand the level of achievement expected.
Students will receive a Record of Achievement, which lists their HSC results and their Preliminary (Year 11) and Stage 5 (Year 10) grades.

Eligibility
To be eligible for the HSC, students must:

  • Have gained qualifications that the NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) considers satisfactory
  • Attend a government school, an accredited non-government school or a school outside of NSW recognised by the NESA
  • Satisfactorily complete a pattern of study required by the NESA for the HSC (this may include examinations, coursework and attendance)

 

NESA-developed courses
NESA-developed courses are the courses for which the NESA develops a syllabus, setting out the objectives, outcomes, structure and content. These are the courses for which the NESA also develops HSC examinations, with the exception of Life Skills courses.

In addition, the NESA develops support materials such as course and assessment requirements, sample examination papers and/or sample questions, marking criteria and performance scales for courses for distribution to all schools. Most board-developed courses contribute to the calculation of the Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) by the Universities Admissions Centre (UAC).

Life Skills courses have board-developed status and have been designed for the small percentage of students, particularly those with an intellectual disability, who cannot access regular course outcomes and content. Life Skills courses contribute to a student’s pattern of study for the HSC but do not contribute towards an ATAR.

NESA-endorsed courses
There are three categories of NESA-endorsed courses. School-developed courses are devised by individual schools in response to local interest or need and are endorsed by the NESA. University-developed courses are devised by universities in conjunction with schools to suit the particular needs of high-ability students. Content-endorsed courses (CECs) are developed by the NESA to cater for a wide range of students in areas that are not served by NESA-developed courses.

All NESA-endorsed courses count towards the HSC and are listed on the student’s record of achievement. However, NESA-endorsed courses do not count towards calculation of the ATAR.

Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses
VET courses teach skills relevant to future study and employment. These courses allow students to gain both the HSC qualification and an Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) VET qualification.

The AQF VET qualifications are recognised by industry and employers throughout Australia. These courses may require that the student spends a minimum number of hours in the workplace. Students receive documentation that report the competencies that they have achieved and an AQF VET Certificate or Statement of Attainment.

NESA-developed VET courses are available in 13 industry frameworks:

  • Automotive
  • Business Services
  • Construction
  • Electrotechnology
  • Entertainment Industry
  • Financial Services
  • Hospitality
  • Human Services
  • Information and Digital Technology
  • Metal and Engineering
  • Primary Industries
  • Retail Services
  • Tourism, Travel and Events

Each framework is made up of combinations of units of competency from National Training Packages. Each framework identifies the units of competency that make up the 120- and 240-hour courses for the HSC in that industry, as well as any specialisation study courses that are available. Students may choose to sit a written examination for the 240-hour VET Framework course. Those who do so may have the course results calculated in their ATAR. You can also study other VET courses in industries where there is no framework. Some of the courses can be studied at school, while others can be studied at TAFE institutes or with other training providers.

VET board-endorsed courses exist in a wide range of industry areas for VET qualifications not included in the board’s suite of Industry Curriculum Frameworks.

Languages
If a student wishes to study a language other than English that is not offered by their school, they may choose to attend the Saturday School of Community Languages and other institutions. These are public secondary schools for students in Years 7–12 who are enrolled in any school system. The school follows the NESA syllabuses in languages that are assessable for both the RoSA and HSC. Other institutions, such as The Open High School, also offer the study of languages outside of a student’s home school.

Unit value
Most courses offered for the HSC have a value of two units in the Preliminary study pattern and two units in the HSC study pattern.

Some one-unit courses are also offered. Extension study is available in English, Mathematics, History, Music and some languages. Extension courses build on the content of the two-unit course and require students to study beyond the two-unit course. A one-unit course is also available in Studies of Religion.

Content-endorsed courses have the flexibility to be delivered as either one-
or two-unit courses.

Pattern of study requirements
English is the only compulsory HSC subject. To be eligible for the award of the HSC, a student must satisfactorily complete at least 12 units in the Preliminary course and at least 10 units in the HSC. Both study patterns must include:

  • At least six units of board-developed courses
  • At least two units of a board-developed course in English
  • At least three courses of two-unit value or greater
  • At least four subjects. No more than six Preliminary units and six HSC units from courses in Science can contribute to the award of the HSC

Assessment
During Year 12, students are assessed using formal written and practical examinations (where appropriate) and school assessments. Students sit external examinations at the end of Year 12. For courses other than VET, a student’s result is a 50/50 combination of their HSC examinations and school assessments.

Students who satisfy the requirements of the HSC will receive a HSC testamur, or award certificate, with the student’s name and school. They also receive a Record of Achievement, which shows each completed HSC course and the result. For courses other than VET, it also includes the mark awarded for school-based assessment, an examination mark, a HSC mark (the average of the assessment and examination mark) and the performance band showing the level of achievement in each course. An AQF VET attainment is provided to students who achieve one or more units of competency in a HSC VET course. They may also receive an AQF VET certificate if they have completed the required units of competency. The grades a student received in Years 10 and 11 are listed on a separate page of the Record of Achievement.
Students undertaking one or more Life Skills courses receive a Profile of Student Achievement with their HSC credentials, outlining the outcomes achieved in each course.

Once the school assessment has been completed, the school provides an assessment mark, calculated on the student’s performance for each course other than VET courses in set assessment tasks, to the NESA. The purpose of this mark is to measure performance over a wider scope than can be measured in a single external exam. In the case of board-endorsed courses, the mark reported is unmoderated.

Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR)
The most common method of gaining entry for university courses in NSW is based on an applicant’s performance in their HSC. Applicants are ranked according to their Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR). ATAR is the common name given to admissions indices across all Australian states and territories (except Queensland). The highest rank a student can achieve is now 99.95. An ATAR of 99.95 means they are in the top 0.05 percentile of students.

The ATAR is based on a scaled aggregate, calculated by the universities using a student’s best 10 eligible units in NESA-developed HSC courses. It is a number reported on a scale of 0–99.95 with intervals of 0.05. It shows where a student stands in relation to all other HSC students for whom an ATAR was also calculated.

Students can include units accumulated over a total period of five years. If a candidate repeats a course, only the mark from the last attempt is taken into account. Students receive an ATAR from the Universities Admissions Centre only if it is requested on their HSC entry.

Internet resources
Students can access important information relating to syllabuses, the RoSA and the HSC.

  • NSW Students Online: studentsonline.nesa.nsw.edu.au
    This site provides HSC students with access to a wealth of HSC resources and support. The materials have been developed by highly experienced HSC teachers and examiners, and many of the site’s resources have been drawn from the best available resources around the world. There is advice on study techniques and exams, and information for parents and students on subjects, career and further study options.

This website is the place for students to log into their personal page, consult their very own HSC calendar and brush up on their exam skills. It includes past papers, practice tests, study tips and all the latest news and information relating to the RoSA and HSC.

Getting results
Students can access their HSC results via the internet or by SMS in mid-December. All students who satisfactorily complete at least one HSC course receive a Record of Achievement listing the courses they completed and their results.

Life after the HSC
One important thing to remember is the HSC is not the be all and end all. Just because your child didn’t receive the mark they had hoped for doesn’t mean they are doomed. While gaining a desirable ATAR rank is one way for your child to obtain his or her entry into a university course, there are other avenues that can be explored should your child not gain placement in their course of choice.

For students who are awarded VET certificates or statements of attainment, they will have advanced standing in other VET courses. School leavers can consider university-bridging courses, summer schools or enrolling at the same institution with a view to internally transferring into a course through academic merit at a later date. Keep an open mind and speak to a school or university careers adviser about your options.

NSW Record of School Achievement (RoSA)
The Record of School Achievement (RoSA) was introduced in 2012 to record a student’s academic achievements throughout the course of the student’s senior studies. A formal RoSA credential is available to those students who wish and are eligible to leave school prior to receiving their HSC. All students are able to access their RoSA information online from the end of Year 10 onwards.

Eligibility
To be eligible for the RoSA, a student must:

  • Attend a government school, an accredited non-government school or
  • a recognised school outside NSW
  • Undertake and complete courses of study that satisfy the NESA curriculum and assessment requirements for the Record of School Achievement
  • Comply with any other regulations or requirements (such as attendance) imposed by the minister or the NESA
  • Complete Year 10
    Along with the RoSA credential, the NESA has developed an optional electronic portfolio called Up2Now, in which students may record their extra-curricular activities.

Tests and awards
In all subjects, with the exception of Life Skills and VET courses, studied in Years 10 and 11, a grade is awarded based on a set of course performance descriptors developed by the NESA, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW. These grades are then placed on each student’s Record of School Achievement. The NESA offers voluntary literacy/numeracy tests to students who are planning to leave school. The tests are delivered online.

The International Baccalaureate (IB)
The International Baccalaureate (IB) is an alternative education pathway and is standardised across the globe. The IB is currently available in more than 4000 schools in 146 countries around the world. It offers four high-quality programs for students in their primary and middle years, and career-related certificate and diploma programs for senior students at the equivalent stage of those doing the HSC.

The IB Diploma Program is a rigorous pre-university course of studies, leading to examinations, which meets the needs of secondary school students in Years 11 and 12. Designed as a comprehensive two-year curriculum that allows its graduates to fulfil requirements of various national education systems, the diploma model aims to address the intellectual, social, emotional and physical wellbeing of students.

IB Diploma Program students must choose one subject from each of five groups (one to five), ensuring breadth of knowledge and understanding in their best language, additional language(s), the social sciences, the experimental sciences and mathematics. Students may choose either an arts subject from group six, or a second subject from groups one to five. In addition to disciplinary and interdisciplinary study, the Diploma Program features core elements that broaden students’ educational experience and challenge them to apply their knowledge and skills. These include a Theory of Knowledge course on critical thinking, an extended independent research-based essay, participation in a range of community service activities, engagement in the arts and development of a healthy lifestyle through physical activity.

The results scale for the IB diploma is different from the HSC, with the top mark being a total of 45. From each student’s IB diploma results, the Universities Admissions Centre (UAC) calculates a UAC rank, which is comparable to the ATAR. In Australia, a result of 45 calculates to a UAC rank of 99.95. For a number of students, the IB Diploma Program is an excellent alternative to the HSC, offering a clearly globally transferable index of achievement for students looking to continue further studies both in Australia and overseas.

For more information on the International Baccalaureate, visit ibo.org

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Home » Education Advice » The Ultimate Guide to Choosing a School for your Child

The Ultimate Guide to Choosing a School for your Child


For many parents, choosing the right school for their child is a daunting and difficult task. Here, we show you how and where to start.

Schools vary greatly in their emphasis, philosophy, activities, staffing and costs. It’s more than just a choice between private and public schooling as there are many factors to consider. We are fortunate in Australia that our education offerings are of a very high standard and we have a large range of options from which to choose.

Because you want to match the best school with the interests and abilities of your children, this often requires a considerable amount of footwork to visit schools to see the facilities on offer and to speak with staff and principals.

St-Andrews

When judging schools, you should be persistent, well researched and have a clear understanding of the New South Wales education system — as well as the choices available — before making your final decision.

ASK YOUR CHILD
Your child will have opinions about what school he or she wants to attend and that may depend on particular areas of interest, subjects offered, perhaps a language and, more often than not, where their friends are going.

Sending a child with little interest in academic studies to a school that prides itself on a high tertiary entrance rate could create problems. Talk to your child’s teachers and find out what they recommend. Most importantly, discuss the decision with your child and work with them — it is their future education.

THE SCHOOL’S VALUES
The school environment will have a considerable influence on your child so you’ll want the values it promotes to be close to your own. You need to work out what you want from a school before asking what it has to offer.

Real

Values don’t just mean moral and religious values. They also refer to a range of social issues, such as the school’s attitude to affirmative action for girls, bullying and discipline policies, right through to the nutritional value of foods available at the school canteen.

PRACTICAL ISSUES
There are also practical points to consider such as your willingness to be involved in school-related activities. You need to decide if you have the time to be part of your child’s travel arrangements or if there are public transport options available. How much time and energy are you prepared to give to the school? Some schools expect a high level of parental involvement, others less.

If you have more than one child at secondary level, are their needs quite similar or are they likely to attend different schools? If going to different schools, demands on your time will be multiplied.

Woman

DO YOUR HOMEWORK
Choosing A School For Your Child is a great starting point for deciding on a secondary school. But there will be other sources of information for finding out what schools offer, including the internet, school visits, open days and discussions with teachers, principals or other appropriate staff. Even the community feeling about a particular school could be part of your research.

Make a shortlist of schools you consider suitable and then organise appointments to speak with the most appropriate person at the school. This might be the registrar, the principal or the year-level coordinator.

INFORMATION CHECKLIST
Compile a checklist of features that are important to you and your child. This will help you gain the information you want from each school. You may want to include:

The school’s aims and philosophies: A school needs to have a clear sense of purpose and should have its aims documented. Ask for a copy of the School Charter. How does it match your expectations? What values are implied? Is it based on any particular religious beliefs? Ask about how the school works to achieve its aims. Is there a commitment to educate each student completely?

Individual care: Is there a commitment to assess and cater for the needs of each student? How is this achieved? How does the school cater for students needing remedial assistance? How does it satisfy the needs of talented children?

Curriculum: The trend in government schools is towards a broad curriculum that doesn’t limit students’ choices or interests, but schools still vary in how well they achieve this. Ask what electives are available and find out which subjects are compulsory in Years 7–10, and what is offered at HSC level. Are boys and girls treated differently in some parts of the curriculum or do they have equal access to all subjects?

Student services and care: Does the school have programs for student welfare, personal development, Years 6–7 transition, school-to-work transition, work experience and careers guidance? Are there specialist staff members in these areas? What pastoral-care facilities and programs are there? In what ways are students encouraged to mix across year levels?

Arden

Discipline and behaviour: Are school rules clearly specified and communicated to students and parents alike? Ask for a copy of the school’s discipline policy. How does it discourage inappropriate behaviour and reinforce good behaviour?

Academic performance: Some schools are justifiably proud of their high success rate in qualifying students to enter tertiary studies. But make sure you have the whole story. Are they referring to the percentage of Year 12 students who qualify or the percentage of Year 7 intake? Do they discourage students who are unlikely to be successful from finishing the HSC? Ask about the school’s promotions policy. On what basis are students promoted from one year level to the next? How many students in the past have left school after Years 10 or 11? What percentage stays on to complete Year 12?

Student assessment: How often are reports on student progress issued? Are they verbal, written or available online? On what basis are students assessed? How often are parent-teacher sessions held? What exams are undertaken and when
are they held? Are they oral or written?

Class sizes and structure: What are the maximum class sizes? Does this vary with the subject? On what basis are the students grouped within classes?

The other students: These make up the community your child will become part of. Do they come from a narrow or broad range of cultural and socio-economic backgrounds? Is the school single-sex or co-educational? What is the relative proportion of boys and girls?

Physical facilities: What facilities are available for specialised subjects such as music, computing, art, science and technology studies? What musical instruments are available to students and are there extra charges involved? How up to date are the materials in the library and what are the library access policies? How much playground space is there and how is it used? What sporting facilities are available?

Science

Teachers: Are the teachers the type of role models you want for your child? What sort of teacher-student relationship is encouraged? What is the staff turnover rate? Do teachers spend extra time with students in activities such as sports coaching?

Extra-curricular activities: What activities are available to students outside the normal curriculum? What clubs are there? Is there a program of camps and school trips? Are they compulsory and what costs are involved?

Homework: How much homework is given and what is expected at the various year levels?

Parent participation: In what ways are parents involved in making decisions about school policies? Is there a parent association? What does it do? What type of parental involvement does the school expect? Are parents invited to participate in classroom activities?

Student participation in decision-making: Is there a student representative council (SRC) or similar body? Are the students elected to decision-making bodies such as the school council and similar committees?

Uniforms

Sport: What sports are available? What are the school’s aims and philosophies regarding sport? Does the school encourage competitiveness or participation? Do boys and girls have equal access to all sports? Are teams single-sex or mixed?

Sport

Technology: What technologies are used in the school and in classes, and how are they being used to increase student engagement and learning? Is the approach to technology integrated and rigorous, or does use of technology in class depend on the initiative of individual teachers?

Costs: While Catholic schools generally charge modest fees, some other private schools have fees that amount to thousands of dollars annually. Government schools do not charge fees as such, but most do request school council levies or subject levies. In both private and government schools, ask about extra charges such as those for musical instrument instruction and hire, camps and excursions, textbooks, uniforms and sports uniforms, sporting equipment and costs related to subject materials.

Admissions policy: On what basis are students selected? Is there a waiting list?

Uniforms: What is the uniform? Is it compulsory? Is there a sports uniform? Is there a uniform recycling system or second-hand uniform shop?

Access to transport: How far from home is the school? What public transport is available? How long will the journey take?

Documentation: Are all policies in writing and available to parents? Are there course outlines, a school prospectus, annual reports and regular newsletters? How does the school communicate with parents?

Music

THE GUT FEELING
While checklists are useful, it’s often a “gut feeling” that can let you know which school is the best for your child. If you can, visit the school at lunchtime, watch the children at play and observe interactions between staff and students. Note how the school is set up for classroom work. Are there rows of desks (suggesting a more traditional methodological approach) or clusters of tables to allow co-operative group work? Listen to the subtle messages your tour guide (registrar, assistant principal, principal) will give you, such as the history of the school, communication with parents, school priorities and future plans.

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Home » School News » History of The Kilmore International School

History of The Kilmore International School


The Kilmore International School is modelled on international schools overseas. It was established in 1990 to provide a true and exceptional international education for students, whether local or from abroad.

The buildings of the school were originally built in 1887 by the Marist Brothers of the Catholic Church and became Assumption College.

The buildings and grounds were purchased by the current owners in the 1980s, then the new owners completely renovated and modernised the existing buildings. New classrooms including a library, science wing, drama and music studios, art rooms, computer laboratories, general classrooms along with staffrooms were added over the next 20 years, as well as a modern dormitory for girls. In 2011, a state-of-the-art Language Learning Centre was opened. The school grounds now contain two soccer fields, basketball courts, cricket facilities and tennis courts.

From 1990 through to 2009, the school offered secondary education only. Due to increased demand for high quality education in the local area, students in Years 5 and 6 were admitted in 2010 and Years 3 and 4 in 2015.

Since opening in 1990 with two international students, the school has grown from strength to strength. Alumni are employed by leading corporations around the globe. A vibrant community of graduates remain close friends with staff and fellow students. Even though the alumni form a diaspora in many nations, they are linked by the experience of completing their IB Diploma together at The Kilmore International School. Its ethos of dedicated, small classes continues as student numbers have grown to more than 400.

In 2021, the school celebrated its 31st anniversary as one of the most successful IB world schools in the southern hemisphere and the success of its graduates, both locally and globally, makes everyone at the school all enormously proud.

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Year 3 - Year 12
Enrolment 400 Students
Fees: 8k - 12k Over 16k
Tuition: $8,920 to $12,820, Boarding: $22,900
Phone
03 5782******* 03 5782 2211
Fax
03 5782******* 03 5782 2525
Address 40 White Street, Kilmore 3764.
Email
info@ki*******
info@kilmore.vic.edu.au
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Home » School News » Extra Curricular Sports at Wahroonga Adventist School

Extra Curricular Sports at Wahroonga Adventist School


Over the course of Term 1, students have attended running training on Friday mornings. The group has seen 40 to 50 participants every week, completing four to five kilometres, in the bush and along the Fox Valley Road paths.

It has been great to see the fitness and speed of the students increasing each session in preparation for the upcoming Cross Country. Thanks as always to committed parent volunteers for providing breakfast after the run! Running training will continue in Term 2.

The WAS mountain bike rides were impacted by the wet weather, however, the school did manage to sneak one ride in for Term 1. More than 50 riders, students and parents from Wahroonga descended upon the “H20″ mountain bike trail at Westleigh. The experienced riders completed a full lap of the trail, while beginner riders completed skills, drills and laps of the green-rated trails. The ride finished with an informal handicapped time trial race where students tried to chase down their friends on a lap of the green trail. More mountain bike rides are scheduled for Term 2.

Wahroonga-2

The Wahroonga Basketball training group have been working hard every Monday afternoon. The junior and beginner sessions have come a long way in developing their skills. The senior session has focused primarily on training for the Tuesday afternoon representative basketball competition, and the senior boys’ and girls’ teams are developing into a highly talented group.

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Religion Christian
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment https://www.wahroonga.adventist.edu.au/enrolment/
Phone
02 9487******* 02 9487 2100
Address 181 Fox Valley Road, Wahroonga NSW 2076
Email
info@wa*******
info@wahroonga.adventist.edu.au
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Home » School News » Roseville College Leads the State in Food Technology

Roseville College Leads the State in Food Technology


Roseville College Year 12 graduates have dominated Food Technology in 2020 with Alexandra van der Laan de Vries and Catherine Ashworth placing 1st and 2nd in Course in NSW, respectively. 

Alexandra, who aims to study a double degree in Medical Science and International Studies at the University of Technology Sydney, met with Ms Deb Magill, principal, and was congratulated warmly on behalf of the college community.

“What a tremendous result for Alexandra and Catherine after such a solid effort in Food Technology over the past two years, which exemplifies the teaching excellence of Mrs Nada Burke, Head of Department, and colleague Mrs Jo Marshall, who have elevated the standard of Food Technology studies at Roseville College for more than a decade. The students and their teachers are to be congratulated for this remarkable outcome,” says Ms Magill.

“As a school, Roseville Colleges places a high value on wellbeing and health, as well as on academic excellence, therefore our Food Technology course is a rigorous course of study, too. I am extremely proud of the Class of 2020 during what was a very unpredictable and challenging year for HSC candidates.”

Alexandra says that her studies in Food Technology taught her practical foundations for health and nutrition in everyday life, and it enriched how she thought about other, related subjects such as Biology and Chemistry.

“Long gone is the stereotype that Food Technology is ‘just cooking’. It is challenging, you need to work hard and be willing to cross-reference with so many other areas of learning such as Economics, Biology, Chemistry, PDHPE and Mathematics,” says Alexandra. “We are all really thankful for our teaching team, who are exceptional.”

In 2016, another Roseville College graduate, Ilana Bolinowsky, placed 1st in Course in NSW in Food Technology, and in the past four years the College has secured 15 Top 50 results, including four places in the Top 20 in 2019.

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Religion Anglican
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Girl
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 830 students from Kindergarten to Year 12
Phone
02 9884******* 02 9884 1100
Address 27 Bancroft Avenue, Roseville NSW 2069
Email
registr*******
registrar@roseville.nsw.edu.au
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Home » School News » Lessons Learnt from Remote Teaching and Learning

Lessons Learnt from Remote Teaching and Learning


Late in Term 1, 2020, COVID-19 forced the cessation of student and staff attendance at school for a then unknown period of time. Accordingly, with very vigorous and splendid work by a number of key staff, St Andrew’s Cathedral School rolled out remote learning. This required training of staff and students in order for them to learn how best to utilise the systems.

During the ensuing weeks of remote learning, the school absorbed many lessons. Firstly, highly dedicated staff went above and beyond to make this mode of learning as effective as it could be. In most cases, remote teaching virtually doubled the workload of teaching staff. This was due, in part, to the inability to deal with all students as a classroom group. Rather, a great deal of individual conferencing with students and parents was required. Further, the preparation to deliver lessons through digital technology was extremely demanding and time consuming for staff.

Remote learning included not just the academic curriculum, but pastoral contacts and, as far as the school could develop creative solutions, co-curricular and sporting activities.

Secondly, St Andrew’s Cathedral School had reinforced to them the diligence and commitment of most students and of the wonderful partnership with parents, who actively supervised students’ learning remotely at home.

Thirdly, the school was reassured that its IT systems were sufficiently robust to cope with so many students and teachers online simultaneously.

Fourthly, it was powerfully confirmed that we are indeed social beings. God made us for community. We need one another and being locked away in physical isolation is no way to live. When students physically returned to school, many were heard to speak two utterances they never thought would pass from their mouths: “I missed school”, “I missed my teachers”. The staff certainly missed them!

Fifthly, we now know that it is not essential for everyone to be on-site all the time in order for learning to occur. While it is not reasonable to expect staff to simultaneously teach on site in the classroom and in remote mode, we are now more fully aware that online learning has powerful potential within regular schooling. We have also had confirmed that the professionalism of our staff is so strong that flexibility in their attendance and delivery of work are viable and consistent with the learning needs of students.

Sixthly, we have somewhat accidently stumbled upon some possible improvements. One example is remote parent/teacher evenings, conducted at a mutually convenient time for parents and staff, from the comfort of their own home. With an eye to the future, we are keen to examine what other changes may apply. Seventh, we have learned the value of social distancing and enhanced hygiene regimes in avoiding not just COVID-19, but other infections such as colds and flus. It is clear that COVID-19 has changed the world of education. The full implications are still being played out.

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Religion Anglican
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 1400 students
Fees: Over 16k
Ranges from $20,588 (Kindergarten) up to $35,100 (Year 12)
Phone
9286 95******* 9286 9500
Address Sydney Square, Sydney 2000
Email
enrolme*******
enrolments@sacs.nsw.edu.au
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Home » School News » Senior Contemporary Dance Program

Senior Contemporary Dance Program


Welcome to the Senior Contemporary Dance Program in association with Sydney Dance Company and The McDonald College.

This program will enable students in Years 10-12 to engage all aspects of Contemporary Dance training and academic studies at The McDonald College, inclusive of the NSW Higher School Certificate.

Students will develop their technical skills and artistry while working with choreographers and educators pioneering their art form. Students may come from a variety of diverse dance backgrounds and will train towards an elite contemporary dance career as an ensemble member of a full-time dance company, an independent dancer, choreographer, director, dance educator, or an integral collaborator in any creative environment.

DOWNLOAD THE COURSE OUTLINE HERE

ENTRY*
2022 – Year 10, 11 & 12

*Please note that this program is for senior high school students only
Entry into Year 12 is subject by approval based on student’s academic status.

AUDITIONS & APPLICATION
Families interested in the program are encouraged to submit their interest on the link below. The College Registrar will be in touch with families once the EOI is received.

Prospective students must submit an Application for Enrolment Form (along with supporting documentation) to the Registrar prior to attending the audition. Please note that the application fee must be paid prior to auditions.

SUBJECTS & TIMETABLE
Students commence at 8.30am and finish at 4.40pm on most days except Thursday (3.40pm finish). There are a total of 10 hours per week allocated for SCDP classes, which are integrated around the school’s academic timetable.

Students will study a range of subjects across dance including Ballet, Technique, Repertoire, Choreographic Development and more. Each term students will get to experience teachings from different guest teachers, choreographers and dance practitioners.

When required, students will also be invited to attend Sydney Dance Company workshops and class viewings. This will be scheduled during performing arts time.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day and Boarding
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Year 3 - Year 12
Enrolment 300 students
Phone
02 9752******* 02 9752 0500
Fax
02 8765******* 02 8765 0195
Address 17 George Street, North Strathfield, 2137
Email
registr*******
registrar@mcdonald.nsw.edu.au
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Home » School News » Three nebulae, as seen from ELTHAM College’s Observatory

Three nebulae, as seen from ELTHAM College’s Observatory


ELTHAM College’s revamped observatory opened in May 2019, and has since provided students with the opportunity to look to the stars and explore their curiosity.

One such young person who has utilised the Observatory is Year 11 student Orlando Yen, who captured this striking image of three distinct nebulae: the Flame Nebula in the centre of the image, NGC 2023 directly below, and the Horsehead Nebula towards the bottom-left of the image.

Orlando writes: “The Flame Nebula is a crowded star forming region near Orion’s belt, 1400 light-years away. As it is an active star-forming region, there are many bright neutron stars with a blue tinge surrounding it. The nebula’s suggestive reddish colour is due to the glow of hydrogen atoms. The Horsehead Nebula is a small dark nebula located 1400 light-years from earth in the same region as the bright emission nebular NGC 2023. The dark reddish colour of the Horsehead Nebula is also due to the large amount of hydrogen in the nebula. NGC 2023 is an emission and reflection nebula, and is one of the largest and brightest reflection nebula in our night sky.”

ELTHAM College Observatory hosts an 11-inch Celestron RASA telescope, which uses a true colour camera to ‘see’ the actual colours of the night sky. These colours were later balanced and intensified by Orlando during image processing. The telescope has a wide field of view, with the ability to capture multiple large portions of the night sky and produce beautiful skyscapes like this one.

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Religion Non - denominational
Type Independent
Day/boarding Day School
Boys/Girls Co-edu
Years Kindergarten - Year 12
Enrolment 690 students
Fees: 8k - 12k 12k - 16k Over 16k
Fees range from $12,180 in ELC (50% child care rebate can be applied to ELC programs) through to $26,772 for Years 10 to 12; Year 9 fees are $28,208
Phone
03 9437******* 03 9437 1421
Fax
03 9437******* 03 9437 1003
Address 1160 Main Road, Research 3095
Email
recepti*******
reception@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au
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